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Small plane makes emergency landing on California freeway

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first_imgEvgen_Prozhyrko/iStock(CARLSBAD, Calif.) — A single-engine plane made an emergency landing on a California freeway Thursday night, authorities said.California Highway Police said the incident took place shortly after 7 p.m. The aircraft came down on the southbound lanes of the I-5 near Carlsbad, nose-diving into the center divide, police said.Video posted by police on social media shows the plane land on the road, but apparently without major damage.No one in the aircraft or on the ground were injured, officials said..The aircraft was carrying a man and a woman, who told firefighters that the Cessna’s cockpit filled with smoke and it lost power.Their identities have not yet been released.The couple was flying from El Monte and were planning to land a few miles away at the Palomar Airport, police said.Police said that they removed the fuel from the plane before it was moved onto a truck with a crane and cleared from the scene.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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ESPN: LA Chargers’ Melvin Gordon could be close to ending holdout

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPhoto by Eric Lars Bakke / ESPN Images(LOS ANGELES) — Los Angeles Chargers running back Melvin Gordon could be close to ending his contract holdout, ESPN reports Wednesday, though no final decision has been made yet.Gordon has been seeking a richer contract from the Chargers, and requested permission to seek a trade earlier this year. The 26-year-old had previously planned to return to the team at some point in October. He has to report no later than November 29 in order to be eligible to play this season. If he did not report by then, he would not accrue credit towards becoming a free agent this offseason.The Chargers have gone 1-2 without Gordon, but running back hasn’t been the team’s biggest issue. In Gordon’s absence, Austin Ekeler (160 yards) and Justin Jackson (142 yards) have replaced much of Gordon’s production.Gordon is scheduled to make $5.605 million this year. The Chargers have said they will not negotiate a new contract with him until after the season.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund September 25, 2019 /Sports News – National ESPN: LA Chargers’ Melvin Gordon could be close to ending holdoutcenter_img Written bylast_img read more

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USA: Destroyer Squadron 26 Heads for Joint Warrior Exercise

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first_img View post tag: Navy Training & Education USA: Destroyer Squadron 26 Heads for Joint Warrior Exercise View post tag: heads Share this article View post tag: Squadron Sailors aboard guided-missile cruisers USS Leyte Gulf (CG 55), USS Vella Gulf (CG 72) guided-missile destroyers USS James E. Williams (DDG 95), USS Cole (DDG 67), USS Ross (DDG 71), guided-missile frigate USS Samuel B Roberts (FFG 58), and fleet replenishment oiler USNS Kanawa (T-AO 196) will participate in the exercise, which is intended to improve interoperability between allied navies in an operationally challenging environment.“Joint Warrior provides our Sailors with an opportunity to work with our coalition partners in a unique tactical environment,” said Capt. Cary Krause, commander, DESRON 26. “This exercise will enhance our ability to operate with our allied navies, and will prepare our participating crews to conduct combined operations during deployment.”The U.S. Navy did not participate in Joint Warrior in 2013 due to budgetary constraints. However, with a new budget in place, the Department of Defense approved the Navy’s participation in Joint Warrior 14-1 because this exercise also serves as a pre-deployment certification event for the participating U.S. ships.“The entire spectrum of planned activities is a chance for our ships to train and hone their skills before their upcoming deployments,” said Krause. “We are thankful for this opportunity and excited to return to Scotland to participate in this exercise with our allies.”Joint Warrior will begin in late March and will last approximately two weeks. It will involve air, sea and ground assets from Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, New Zealand, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Exercise scenarios include small boat attacks, boarding operations, air defense, anti-submarine warfare, and ship maneuverability tasks. More than 30 individual units, including aviation, surface, and subsurface, are participating and playing a distinct role.[mappress]Press Release, March 17, 2014, 2014; Image: Wikimedia View post tag: Exercise View post tag: Naval View post tag: 26 View post tag: Joint View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Warrior Six ships, led by Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 26, departed the U.S. for Scotland, March 14, to participate in Joint Warrior 14-2, a semiannual, United Kingdom-led training exercise designed to provide NATO and allied forces a unique multi-warfare environment in which to prepare for global operations. March 17, 2014 View post tag: Destroyer Back to overview,Home naval-today USA: Destroyer Squadron 26 Heads for Joint Warrior Exercise last_img read more

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News story: Michael Gove celebrates the best of Welsh at the Royal Show

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first_img It is a pleasure to be here in this beautiful part of Wales for one of the biggest and best agricultural events of the year. As we leave the EU we have a once in a lifetime opportunity to transform our food, farming and environmental policies. We expect to see more powers than ever before being granted to the Welsh government, and we are continuing to work closely to deliver a Brexit that will benefit Welsh farmers and consumers. Secretary of State for Wales Alun Cairns said: Environment Secretary Michael Gove said: Environment Secretary Michael Gove joined Welsh Secretary Alun Cairns at the Royal Welsh Show in Llanelwedd today, 24 July, experiencing the very best of Welsh food, farming and rural life.They met with the Welsh Government’s Cabinet Secretary for Rural Affairs Lesley Griffiths AM, as well as representatives from the Royal Welsh Agricultural Society, Farmers Union Wales and NFU Cymru, to discuss future farming policy once we leave the EU.Earlier this month the Secretary of State welcomed the proposals from the Welsh Government to replace the EU’s Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and make the most of the new freedoms provided by Brexit.He also reiterated the need for Defra and the Welsh Government to work closely to reduce the bureaucracy faced by farms on the Wales-England border, addressing some of the points raised in response to Defra’s public consultation.Later in the afternoon he visited the Food Hall – sponsored by Food is GREAT – which celebrates fantastic local produce including: I am delighted to welcome the Environment Secretary to the Royal Welsh Show once again. It’s a wonderful showcase for the quality of our livestock, food and drink and farm produce, highlighted by the hundreds of thousands of visitors who flock to Builth Wells year upon year to experience this showpiece event. From multi-million pound investments in superfast broadband to supporting innovation in the agri-tech sector through our modern Industrial Strategy, we are delivering the measures needed to support the agricultural industry in Wales. As we move into the final stages of EU exit negotiations, we are stepping up our engagement to make sure the voices of the sector are heard. To find out more about the Royal Welsh Show, which runs until 26 July, please see here Snowdonia Cheese – The Snowdonia Cheese Company was established in 2001 and has created a luxury range of cheeses from around the lakes and mountains of North Wales Anglesey Sea Salt – the finest sea salt from the clean waters that surround Anglesey, produced by food company Halen Môn and used in some of the best restaurants worldwide Lochmeyler Farm Ice Cream – a family dairy farm making ice cream from its 350 free-range cows, with flavours including blackberry, ginger and Pembrokeshire salted caramel Blodyn Aur – translated as ‘Golden Flower’, this is Welsh rapeseed oil grown and pressed on a farm near the village of Llanfihangel Glyn Myfyr Apple County Cider – award-winning ciders from orchards on the Monmouthshire hillslast_img read more

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The Vaccination Debate: A profile of last year’s vote and what it may tell us about COVID shots today

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first_imgBy Paul MillsWe love our anniversaries. Newspapers typically feature them as in century and half century retrospectives. So, let’s now turn the clock back a bit, not 100 or even 50 years but just one year ago.It’s late February 2020, the time when the first cases of community transmission of the Coronavirus were reported in the United States and just two weeks before Maine records its first positive case.It’s thus the prelude to COVID-19, an acronym that to most still conjured up comparisons to a potentially approaching rain shower that would in any event pass over in a matter of days, not foreseen as a potentially paralyzing blizzard.Maine was at the same time weighing in on a People’s Veto referendum aimed at overturning a recently passed law eliminating philosophical and religious exemptions for vaccination requirements for students attending public schools.Seventy-three percent of Maine voters rejected the veto, that is, they upheld the new law that required student vaccinations against a variety of illnesses, the vote being 281-thousand to 105-thousand.The newly developed COVID vaccines have not yet joined measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, diphtheria, polio, hepatitis, chickenpox, and influenza as those required of public school students. The vaccination debate thus continues, just as it did in the heated Maine plebiscite of a year ago at this time.Though there is no present occasion to cast a ballot on vaccinations this year, there are ongoing tabulations on the extent to which Mainers are endorsing them. Not surprisingly the counties in Maine that were most supportive at the ballot box a year ago are also those with the greatest percentage of its citizens obtaining COVID vaccinations today.The three counties turning in the highest percentage of support for vaccinations in last March’s referendum – Cumberland, Sagadahoc, and Lincoln – are the same whose residents are the likeliest to have so far had an arm that has taken at least one dose of a COVID jab. These three west and mid coastal counties each cast 75 percent of their votes for the law requiring public school vaccinations while each of them are the only ones with over 14 percent of its citizens who have so far taken a COVID vaccinationThere is not yet an officially released breakdown among the nearly 500 cities towns, plantations, and voting districts, reports now being at the level of Maine’s sixteen counties. It is possible to revisit the returns from last year’s vote, however, at that more detailed level to check in on the alignment.From this, a rather pronounced geographic tension emerges. Though 64 places voted against compulsory public school shots last year, none of them were among Maine’s 23 cities. Indeed, the largest of the 64 towns and voting districts to throw in its lot with the anti-vac movement, the Piscataquis County town of Guilford, has a population of a mere 1,521. All of those voting with the anti-vaccination movement – with the exception of Newry, home to Sunday River Ski area – were in the eastern half of the state.A sampling of the outcome in such communities provides some quaint illustrations. Those in the libertarian camp would find allegorical significance that Waldo County’s Freedom voted 149 to 97 to overturn the compulsory vaccination law. The nearby town of Liberty did not quite fulfill such expectations, though it was closely divided, going 175 to 149 in favor of the law.A town named for the cradle of democracy, Athens, also provides some consolation to those who would like the right to opt out of government mandated medical procedures. Citizens there, just 13 miles north of Skowhegan, voted 105 to 96 in support of such sentiments. Abutting Athens to the east is the town of Harmony, which voted the same way, 101 to 91, the town’s name being emblematic of a result that mirrored that of its neighbor.Place names that most Maine people have seldom if ever heard from did make their voices known last year. It was in a way that demonstrates the cleavage that often exists between urban and rural Maine, one that seems likely to emerge again in the coming months as many but not all roll up their sleeves.Paul Mills is a Farmington attorney well known for his analyses and historical understanding of public affairs in Maine; he can be reached by e-mail [email protected]last_img read more

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Soulive Announce First Run Of 2018

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first_imgToday, fan-favorite soul-funk-jazz fusion trio Soulive announced their first U.S. dates of 2018. The band will head to the Ardmore Music Hall in Ardmore, PA (just outside Philadelphia) for a two-night run on Friday, March 2nd and Saturday, March 3rd.Watch Soulive And Marcus King Tear Up “Whipping Post” During Bowlive [Pro-Shot]The band, comprised of guitarist Eric Krasno, keyboardist/organist Neal Evans, and drummer Alan Evans, has long been a highly sought-after act for more nearly two decades. In recent years, however, the band has played less and less dates, predominantly restricting their U.S. performance schedule to their semi-annual Brooklyn Bowl residency (known as “Bowlive“) and a handful of festival dates.Soulive, Scofield, Marcus King, & The Shady Horns Play “Liz Reed” And “Lovelight” At Bowlive [Videos]In the meantime, the groups prolific individual members have kept busy with a variety of other projects. Neal continues to tour the world with Lettuce and Alan has helped spawn new groups like Matador! Soul Sounds (featuring members of The New Mastersounds, Pimps of Joytime, Orgone, and more). Eric has maintained his usual jack-of-all-trades work schedule, leading his own Eric Krasno Band, continuing to play select dates with Lettuce, and helping lead collaborative projects with everyone from Phil Lesh to John Scofield to members of The Meters, producing albums from groups like The Marcus King Band and The Motet, and lending his songwriting abilities to GRAMMY-nominated records from Robert Randolph & The Family Band and Tedeschi Trucks Band.Soulive Brings Antwaun Stanley, Lawrence, Snarky Puppy Horns To Friday Bowlive Blowout [Videos]The Ardmore Music Hall shows mark a rare hard-ticket, non-Bowlive run for the band, who look to be once again ramping up their performance schedule for the coming year. Tickets for the run go on sale this Friday, December 8th at 12pm EST via the venue website.last_img read more

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For bigger data, more storage

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first_img Related As big data becomes a common analytical tool in fields from the sciences to the humanities, Harvard’s computer infrastructure experts are turning their attention to an increasingly pressing question: How do you manage it all?In recent years, Harvard invested in the Odyssey computing cluster, whose 60,000 CPUs provide the sheer computing horsepower needed to crunch big data.But as large data sets multiply, the question of where to put the information and how to seamlessly retrieve it for analysis has become increasingly important. In August, the National Science Foundation announced a grant of nearly $4 million over the next five years to develop the North East Storage Exchange (NESE), a collaboration among five area universities, including Harvard, to provide not just space for massive data sets, but also the high-speed infrastructure that allows it to be quickly retrieved for analysis.“People are downloading now 50 to 80 terabyte data sets from NCBI [the National Center for Biotechnology Information] and the National Library of Medicine over an evening. This is the new normal. People [are] pulling genomic data sets wider and deeper than they’ve ever been,” said James Cuff, Harvard’s assistant dean and distinguished engineer for research computing. “What used to be — in lab, in vivo, or in vitro practice — ‘cutting edge’ … are now standard old processes. PCR [polymerase chain reaction] was cutting edge at one point. Now it’s just a thing you do.”The institutions involved include Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University, Boston University, and the University of Massachusetts. They are taking on the project as an expansion of their existing high-performance computing collaboration. In 2012, the five institutions opened the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC). Located in Holyoke on a rehabilitated industrial site, MGHPCC provides state-of-the-art computing services and is home to part of Harvard’s Odyssey computer. The site was also designed to be energy-efficient and is largely run on hydropower and solar energy.MGHPCC President Richard McCullough, Harvard’s vice provost for research and professor of materials science and engineering, said the capacity the project will provide is badly needed, but the project is seen as more than a one-off effort. Lessons learned will help inform similar efforts elsewhere.“You just need more and more of these kinds of resources to be at the forefront of data science,” McCullough said. “This grant will keep us at the forefront, and may allow us to take a quantum leap forward. This is a really important win for us.” Cuff expects data retrieval from the North East Storage Exchange to be about 10 times faster than that from equivalent storage through private cloud-based servers, and McCullough said it will be cheaper too, just a fifth that of commercial vendors.Cuff, NESE’s principal investigator, said that officials hope to have more than 50 petabytes of storage capacity available at MGHPCC within the next five years, with the ability to expand it further. John Goodhue, MGHPCC’s executive director and a co-principal investigator of NESE, said he expects the speed of the connection to collaborating institutions to double or triple over the next few years.“What we’re building is an extendable architecture,” Cuff said.Though Cuff said NESE could be thought of as collaborating institutions’ private cloud, he doesn’t expect NESE to compete with commercial cloud storage providers. Rather, he said, researchers have a range of data storage options, which should be matched to their purpose. NESE, for example, could potentially back up its data to the cloud.“This isn’t a competitor to the cloud. It’s a complementary cloud storage system,” Cuff said.Cuff compared the NESE collaboration to the early days of the internet, when the communications needs of groups of institutions prompted them to create computer networks that grew increasingly interconnected. Now, the problem facing institutions around the country is how to manage the tidal wave of data being generated by researchers and the larger wave likely to break over them in the years to come.The collaboration depends on contributions from each institution, Cuff said, adding that the five-year effort is also an experiment in managing their needs in order to build the research computing infrastructure of the future.Despite all the effort, Goodhue and Cuff said, ultimately the goal is to make it invisible to the users.“There’s cost savings at every level, savings in the amount of time a researcher has to spend worrying about whether the data is OK and backed up properly,” Goodhue said. “Having something so easy to work with that you don’t even have to think about it is a goal too.” Across Harvard, programs and researchers are mining vast quantities of computerized information, sometimes revolutionizing their fields in the process Big data, massive potentiallast_img read more

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Memorial Mass commemorates life of junior Theresa Sagartz

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first_imgCaitlyn Jordan Students and other members of the Notre Dame community attended Mass at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on Wednesday night in memory of junior Theresa Sagartz who died last week.“As we situate Theresa’s death into the fabric of our day-to-day lives, we are invited to look back, not with sadness or regret, but with gratitude, to be thankful for the way she touched our hearts, both directly and indirectly [in] her love of her family and friends, the resilience with which she lived her life,” McCormick said.“Through Jesus’ life, death and resurrection, he demonstrated how far he would go to prove God’s love and lasting commitment to each of us. Jesus’ testimony and God’s desire to be in relationship with us now serves as the basis for our prayer tonight, to commend a sister, a daughter, a friend, a role model, back to God.”McCormick said Sagartz was a woman who lived selflessly and was known for both her compassion and leadership — evident in her multiple roles on campus, which included being an “honorary mom” to section 2A in Zahm House who brought oranges to soccer games.“The list could go on forever of the things that made Theresa, Theresa,” McCormick said. “But what we celebrate is her turning back to God, a God who so deeply loves each of us that he has created a space for us in him to return. Theresa’s life has changed. It has not ended.”Sagartz’s life was a manifestation of God’s grace, McCormick said.“God blessed Theresa with the precise amount of time needed for her to make an impact on this world. We no doubt would have preferred more of it, yet so goes the delicate and precious nature of life. And while we are tempted to measure the quality of life in years, the true measure of life is what you do in the time that you have,” McCormick said. “If a person with 75 years mostly wraps himself in anger and greed, what good is that? Is it somehow better than 21 years filled with love and service to others? … No matter the time we have here, five minutes or 100 years, we are invited to look forward, mirroring God’s love that extends beyond us and extends beyond death.”The fullness of Sagartz’s life can serve as inspiration, McCormick said.“Leaving the Basilica tonight, my sincere hope is that each of us might be changed in some way,” he said. “Perhaps we may express a deeper gratitude for the family, friends and those lives that we come in contact with on a daily basis. … Or maybe, we develop a deeper trust through Jesus’ life, death and resurrection — that we do not mourn Theresa’s death as if it were the end, but rather, prayerfully, as she begins her journey to eternal life.”Senior News Writer Catherine Owers contributed to this report.Tags: memorial, memorial mass, Student death, Theresa Sagartz Family, friends and members of the Notre Dame community filled the Basilica of the Sacred Heart Wednesday evening to honor the life of Theresa Sagartz, a junior and former resident of Pangborn Hall, who died last week in her off-campus apartment due to apparent natural causes related to a medical condition.University President Fr. John Jenkins celebrated the memorial Mass, and Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry, delivered the homily. The Notre Dame Liturgical Choir provided music for the Mass.last_img read more

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Watch BYU Vocal Point’s Amazing A Cappella Newsies Tribute

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first_imgTake note: THIS is how you seize the day. The guys of Brigham Young University’s a cappella group Vocal Point donned their vests and suspenders to perform an insane medley featuring our favorite Alan Menken tunes from the Disney musical Newsies. As if that weren’t enough, they pulled off the four-minute performance in just one take, backed by 85 dancing, leaping, back-flipping BYU student performers. Take a look below as the singing students carry the banner all around campus! Related Shows View Comments Newsies Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 24, 2014last_img

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Pigweed pollen

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first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaSpringtime tree pollen covers much of Georgia now. Lynn Sosnoskie plans to track a different kind of pollen this summer, one that has the potential to spread the worst thing to hit Georgia cotton in decades.Sosnoskie, a post doctoral research associate with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will run experiments in cotton fields, greenhouses and laboratories to learn more about the pollen released by Palmar amaranth, a nasty plant commonly called pigweed. She wants to know how much pollen a pigweed plant produces, when it produces it, what it looks like, how far the pollen flies, how long it is viable and how weather affects it. The cotton industry wants answers because inside some of those tiny pollen grains is a genetic trait that could force Georgia farmers to change the way they grow cotton, or force them to stop growing it.“There isn’t much literature out there on anything like this. We’re pretty much making it as we go,” she said.Farmers in some areas can no longer kill pigweed with glyphosate, a popular herbicide sold under the brand name Roundup. It’s the one weed they didn’t want to develop resistance to glyphosate. It can grow several inches per day and be the size of a small tree in a few months. It steals nutrients away from cotton plants and can clog cotton harvesters. In 1997, farmers started planting cotton that was developed to stay healthy when sprayed with Roundup. They could spray the herbicide over the top of this cotton, killing weeds but not the cotton. Virtually all Georgia cotton grown now is “Roundup Ready” because it saves farmers time and money.In 2004, rumors of resistant weeds started popping up. In 2005, it was confirmed: Georgia was the first place in the world to have glyphosate-resistant pigweed. Since then, it has been confirmed in 18 south-central Georgia counties. North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas have confirmed it, too.Palmar amaranth pollen is dimpled much like a golf ball, which is designed to travel long distances, Sosnoskie said.“Because Palmar amaranth is wind pollinated,” she said, “this trait has the potential to spread beyond a single farm or county. It’s not just one person’s problem. It’s everyone’s problem.”Sosnoskie will take the information she collects (she already has two-year’s worth) and make mathematical models. The models can be used to show problem spots. Models can also show where it could spread and how. The Georgia cotton industry must catch up and try to stay ahead of this growing issue, said Stanley Culpepper, a CAES weed specialist. He has compared the pigweed problem to the boll weevil. That little pest crippled cotton production in the Southeast in the mid-1900s. It continued to be a problem until a multimillion-dollar eradication program started in 1987 stopped the pest in 1994. “This issue is not going away,” Culpepper said. “This research will be a key in helping get answers and provide growers and the industry ways to control its spread.”last_img read more

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