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Firefighters’ rise set at 2 per cent

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first_imgFirefighters’ rise set at 2 per centOn 29 Feb 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. • More than 40,000 people are employed by fire services across the UK with afurther 18,000 working on a retained basis.Their latest pay agreement increases basic pay rates by 2 per cent from lastNovember.Retained fees and long service awards were also increased by 2 per cent. Afirefighter with 10 years’ service would receive £1,437 while for an officer of35-years standing the figure is £2,517.However the London allowance – which covers employees working in the formerGreater London Council area – remains at £2,793.www.incomesdata.co.uk Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img

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UVU Men’s Basketball Hosts Sam Houston State Saturday

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first_img Brad James Tags: Cameron Delaney/Conner Toolson/Jake Toolson/Sam Houston State/Southland Conference/UVU Men’s Basketball FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailOREM, Utah-Saturday, Utah Valley men’s basketball, currently tied for the 4th longest home-winning streak in the country with 19 games, hosts Sam Houston State Saturday.The 9-4 Wolverines will be meeting the Bearkats, who represent the Southland Conference, for only the second time in history.Utah Valley bested Sam Houston State 75-64 at Huntsville, Texas December 22, 2017.The Wolverines have won eight of their last nine games and rank 19th nationally with 490 total rebounds.Utah Valley is also 33rd in the nation in both defensive rebounds per game (28.92) and total assists (192).The Wolverines rank 37th nationally in made 3-point field goals (109) and are 50th in field goal percentage, at 48.2 percent.Jake Toolson remains the Wolverines’ leading scorer, averaging 15.7 points per game and is shooting 56.2 percent from the field. Conner Toolson is close behind, posting 14.3 points per contest. Conner Toolson is also shooting 48.1 percent behind the arc on the season.The Wolverines score 77.9 points per game and only give up 72.3 points per contest.The Bearkats come into Orem at 4-7 but have played lots of close games as they give up 70 points per game and score 69.9 points per contest.Sam Houston State is led by redshirt senior guard Cameron Delaney who posts 11.5 points and 4.3 rebounds per game. Written by December 21, 2018 /Sports News – Local UVU Men’s Basketball Hosts Sam Houston State Saturdaylast_img read more

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KK sales down

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first_imgIn the US, Krispy Kreme Doughnuts, reported an 11.7% revenue decreased to $103.4m for the third quarter ended 28 October, 2007, despite the closure of 17 factory stores, 12 US domestic stores and 25 franchises. Third-quarter sales decreased approximately 2.6% from the third quarter of last year, while the net loss was $798,000, compared to a loss of $7.2m in the comparable 2006 period.last_img

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Another 133,000 Indiana residents file unemployment claims

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first_imgCoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp Another 133,000 Indiana residents file unemployment claims Twitter Google+ Twitter (“Unemployment Office” by Bytemarks, CC BY 2.0)center_img By Associated Press – April 11, 2020 0 343 INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — More than 133,000 people filed initial claims for unemployment in Indiana last week as the coronavirus pandemic kept businesses closed and workers furloughed.U.S. Department of Labor numbers show that the 133,639 Hoosiers who sought jobless benefits during the week ending April 4 was down slightly from the 139,174 who filed the previous week.Congress’ $2.2 trillion pandemic relief package includes an extra $600 a week in unemployment benefits on top of the usual state payments.The Indianapolis Business Journal reports that Indiana residents who have filed for unemployment should begin receiving that extra $600 payment as early as April 20, retroactive to March 29. Pinterest Facebook Google+ WhatsApp Previous articleMan arrested after shooting death of Indianapolis officerNext articleAnderson facility has 24 COVID-19 deaths; state toll 300 Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications.last_img read more

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Press release: Natural doesn’t mean safe – herbal medicines found to contain steroids

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first_img During office hours: 020 3080 7651 (08:30 – 17:00) Media enquiries Office hours are Monday to Friday, 8:30am to 5pm. For real-time updates including the latest press releases and news statements, see our Twitter channel at https://www.twitter.com/mhragovuk The sale of potent steroid creams directly to the public is illegal for good reason. If used without medical supervision these medicines can be dangerous. Steroids must be prescribed by healthcare professionals who follow strict criteria when prescribing them and monitoring patients using them. They can suppress the skin’s response to infection, can cause long-term thinning of the skin, and if applied long term over a wide area, particularly in babies and children, can cause other medical problems. Our advice to anyone who is using Yiganerjing Cream, particularly on young children and babies, is to discontinue use immediately. If you have any questions, please contact your healthcare professional. Email [email protected] News centreMHRA10 South ColonnadeLondonE14 4PU The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency is warning people who may have purchased a “natural” Chinese herbal medicine, Yiganerjing Cream, as a treatment for skin conditions to stop using it immediately as it has been found to contain an undisclosed steroid and two antifungal ingredients.MHRA officials have been acting to stop the sale of this cream and have had it withdrawn from many websites and on-line market places but people may have purchased it in the past and still be using it.Yiganerjing Cream is not a licensed medicine and has been marketed in the UK as a “natural” Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of a range of skin conditions, most commonly eczema, psoriasis and rosacea.Our analysis found the presence of the steroid clobetasol propionate. This steroid is the active ingredient in Prescription-Only Medicines used for the treatment of a range skin conditions such as psoriasis and eczema. Creams containing steroids should be used sparingly and as directed by the prescriber. It is contraindicated in children under 1 year of age.We are also aware of the use, via a herbal clinic, of a product called Penny Orange Cream which has also been found to contain clobetasol propionate. While this product is no longer available, and we are not aware of its widespread use, it did contain an undisclosed steroid and should not be used.If you are unsure about the safety of a medicine claiming to be “natural” or “herbal” you should check for a Marketing Authorisation (MA) or Product Licence (PL) number or Traditional Herbal Registration (THR) number / the THR logo. This means the product has been assessed by MHRA for safety and has been manufactured correctly. For more information, visit NHS.Dr Chris Jones, Manager of the Medicines Borderline Section at MHRA said: If you are aware of Yiganerjing cream being sold, please report it to MHRA at [email protected] Out of office hours: 07770 446 189 (17:00 – 08:30)last_img read more

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Watch The Magical Grateful Dead Concert That Occurred On This Day In 1977 [Full Video]

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first_img1977 was a golden year in Grateful Dead history. The band had thoroughly settled in with their newest additions, the Godchauxs, and were playing some of the best music of their career. As with most years of their career, the Dead spent most of the year on the road, performing across the country with eager fans following their every beckon call.The group kicked off a major spring tour on April 22nd, before settling into the Passaic, NJ Capitol Theatre for a three night run from 4/25 through 4/27. There was some serious magic in the air for the run’s finale, which saw the Dead open with Chuck Berry’s “Promised Land” and roar through an extended version of “Mississippi Half-Step.” Lengthy versions of “Sugaree,” “Scarlet Begonias / Fire On The Mountain,” “Terrapin Station” and “Morning Dew” highlight this particularly tasty treat.Another treat, of course, is the full video that has been captured by Music Vault and shared for your viewing pleasure. Sit back, relax, and enjoy the show:Setlist: Grateful Dead at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ – 4/27/77Setlist:0:00:00 – Introduction0:01:49 – Promised Land0:05:22 – crowd noise0:07:06 – Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo0:15:05 – crowd noise0:19:49 – Looks Like Rain0:27:10 – crowd noise0:29:19 – Sugaree0:40:48 – crowd noise0:43:02 – El Paso0:47:43 – crowd noise0:49:43 – Row Jimmy0:58:42 – crowd noise1:00:40 – New Minglewood Blues1:05:46 – Banter1:07:05 – Loser1:15:36 – crowd noise1:17:27 – The Music Never Stopped1:24:33 – Intermission1:35:44 – Estimated Prophet1:44:04 – crowd noise1:45:53 – Scarlet Begonias / Fire On The Mountain2:07:00 – crowd noise2:08:34 – Ramble On Rose2:15:42 – crowd noise2:18:32 – Samson And Delilah2:25:34 – crowd noise2:29:24 – Terrapin Station2:39:50 – Morning Dew2:52:00 – Banter3:02:46 – Johnny B. Goode[originally published 4/27/16]last_img read more

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Natural flu-fighting protein discovered in human cells

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first_imgHarvard researchers report having discovered a family of naturally occurringantiviral agents in human cells, a finding that may lead to better ways to prevent and treat influenza and other viral infections.In both human and mouse cells the flu-fighting proteinsprevented or slowed most virus particles from infecting cells at theearliest stage in the virus lifecycle. The anti-viral action happenssometime after the virus attaches itself to the cell and before itdelivers its pathogenic cargo.“We’ve uncovered the first-line defense in how our bodies fight theflu virus,” said Stephen Elledge, the Gregor Mendel professor ofgenetics and of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a seniorgeneticist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). “The protein isthere to stop the flu. Every cell has a constitutive immune responsethat is ready for the virus. If we get rid of that, the virus has aheyday.”“When we knocked the proteins out, we had more virus infection,” saidgeneticist Abraham Brass, an instructor in medicine at HMS and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), who led the study first as apostdoctoral fellow with Elledge and then in his ownlab at the Ragon Institute. “When we increased the proteins, we hadmore protection,” Brass said. The native antiviral defenders are also crucial after the cells areinfected, Brass and his co-authors found. In the cells, the proteinsaccounted for more than half of the protective effect of theinterferon immune response. Interferon orchestrates a large componentof the infection-fighting machinery.“Interferons gave the cells even more protection, but not if we tookaway the antiviral proteins,” Brass said. The study is publishedin today’s early on-line edition of the journal Cell.The potent interferon response is what makes people feel so sick whentheir bodies are fighting the flu or when receiving interferons astherapy. “If we can figure out ways to increase levels of thisprotein without interferon, we can potentially increase naturalresistance to some viruses without all the side effects of theinterferons,” Elledge said.In the study, the surprisingly versatile antiviral proteins protectedcells against several devastating human viruses-not only the currentinfluenza A strains including H1N1 and strains going back to the1930s, but also West Nile virus and dengue virus. While IFITM did notprotect against HIV or the hepatitis C virus, experiments suggestedthe protein may defend against others, including yellow fever virus.The researchers do not know how the antiviral proteins deflect thisvariety of viruses, which use different mechanisms of entry into thecell. The protein family, called interferon-inducible transmembraneproteins (IFITM), was first discovered 25 years ago as products ofone of the thousands of genes turned on by interferon. Since then,not much else has been discovered about the IFITM family. Versions ofthe IFITM genes are found in the genomes of many creatures, from fishto chickens to mice to people, suggesting the antiviral mechanism hasbeen working successfully for millions of years in protectingorganisms from viral infections.In Elledge’s lab, Brass began the study as a genetic screen to learnhow the body blocks the flu. The researchers had previously runsimilar screens with hepatitis C virus and with HIV. In the screen,the researchers used small interfering RNA to systematically knockdown one gene at a time by depleting the proteins the genes weretrying to make. Then they examined what effect each blocked gene hadon a cell’s response to influenza A virus.The screen revealed more than 120 genes with potential roles indifferent stages of infection. Four of those genes, when knockeddown, allowed for a robust increase in the infection of cells byinfluenza A virus. Of these four candidate “restriction factors,” theresearch team concentrated on the IFITM3 protein because of its knownlink to interferon and found two closely related proteins in theIFITM family with similar activity.The most distinctive property of the first-line IFITM3 defense is itspreventive action before the virus can fuse with the cell, saidco-author and virologist Michael Farzan, associate professor ofmicrobiology and molecular genetics at HMS and the New EnglandPrimate Research Center. “The virus is unable to make a protein inthe cell to counteract the IFITM proteins, because the cell isalready primed against the virus,” Farzan said. “To find somethingthat hits the flu and hits it so close to the entry stage of theviral life cycle is really interesting and unusual among viralrestriction factors.”The researchers have more questions than answers about how the IFITMrestriction factors actually work, but they are excited about therange of inquiry the discovery opens up. For example, variations inthe protein from person to person may explain differences in people’ssusceptibility to flu and other viral infections, as well as itsseverity, the researchers speculate.And if scientists can understand the mechanism of action, they may beable to design new therapies with even better antiviral actions. Theproteins themselves may be useful for defending against infections inanimals, like birds and pigs, which might prevent the emergence ofnew, potentially more dangerous influenza A strains.In another potential application, if IFITM3 has a role in the chickenembryos or canine cells used to make flu vaccines, inhibiting theproteins may speed up vaccine production, which has been an issuethis year with the manufacture of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine.The research was funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, thePhillip T. and Susan M. Ragon Foundation, the National Institutes ofHealth, New England Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense,Cancer Research UK the Wellcome Trust, and the Kay Kendall LeukaemiaFoundation. BWH and MGH have filed a U.S. patent application for thistechnology that relates to the identification and use of host factorsto modulate viral replication/growth.last_img read more

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Century-old tortilla chip in a Harvard collection

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first_imgA beetle necklace, Mark Twain’s microscope, a 19th-century slate bearing “messages” from the spirit world, and a 100-year-old Mexican tortilla — given more than 350 years, you can collect some bizarre and fascinating items.Harvard has been collecting things for a long time, probably beginning with the donation of a library by its namesake, John Harvard, upon his death in 1638. Since then, the university has amassed more than 50 collections, not including libraries…Read more herelast_img

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Borghese Winery Owner Dies in Crash

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The 70-year-old owner of the first North Fork winery died when the SUV he was driving was involved in a head-on crash with a truck in Wading River on Monday afternoon.Riverhead Town Police said Maro Borghese was driving his Jeep Grand Cherokee eastbound on Route 25A when he failed to negotiate a curve in the roadway and collided with a westbound box truck at 3:33 p.m.Borghese was taken to Peconic Bay Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.The victim is the owner of Castello di Borghese Vineyard in Cutchogue, the first winery to open on the East End more than 40 years ago, paving the way for more than 100 others that make up the North Fork Wine Trail today. He bought it in 1999.His passing came days after his 56-year-old wife, Ann Marie Borghese, also died.Riverhead town police are continuing the investigation into the cause of the crash with the assistance of New York State police.last_img read more

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What the ATM of the future will look like

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first_img 32SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Commerce has become more high tech — think mobile payments, pin-and-chip credit cards and even fingerprint and retinal scanners — but we still haven’t lost our love for good old cash.And banks aren’t ignoring that love, investing millions in some major upgrades in ATMs. Just last week, the largest consumer bank in the U.S. by assets, Chase Bank JPM, +0.94% announced plans for cash machines that customers can access with their mobile phones, without having to use any type of ATM card.The majority of Chase’s 18,000 ATMs will have this feature by the end of 2016.(The card-free feature is already available on ATMs for BMO Harris Bank, which has rolled the feature out to roughly 900 ATMs it owns, and Wintrust Bank, in Illinois). continue reading »last_img read more

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