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5 Reasons Not To Miss The Inaugural NOLA Crawfish Festival In Days Between Jazz Fest

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first_imgThe inaugural NOLA Crawfish Festival runs during the days between Jazz Fest, from April 25th through the 27th. The fest brings together all the elements of a perfect party: Awesome music, delicious food and plenty of refreshing beer. With music fans everywhere descending on New Orleans for beloved music festival, the city is gearing up to show the world why it’s known as one of the greatest places to party on the planet. While there’s no shortage of fun to be had during Jazz Fest itself, there is a three day lull in between weekends that cried out for a party, and those pleas were answered by the NOLA Crawfish Festival. Situated in the “Daze Between,” the Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday when Jazz Fest is resetting itself, the NOLA Crawfish Festival is giving local fans and visitors to the Crescent City alike a way to let the good times keep rolling.Here’s the top five reasons why you shouldn’t miss out on this incredible opportunity for a once-in-a-lifetime combination of authentic New Orleans tunes, food, friends and fun.1. The MusicThe musical legacy of New Orleans will be on display for all three days of the NOLA Crawfish Festival, with appearances by local legends like The Meters George Porter Jr., Dumpstaphunk‘s Ivan Neville, Anders Osborne, The Radiators’ David Malone, Papa Mali, Papa Gros and many more in a series of incredible, once-in-a-lifetime jam sessions. Gathering so many gifted improvisers together and turning them loose guarantees that, wherever the music flows, the players will be ready for whatever they throw at each other. There are also a few of Nawlins stalwart bands on the bill, including Billy Iuso & The Restless Natives, Honey Island Swamp Band, Colin Lake, Mike Zito & The Wheel, and Johnny Sansone who will be delivering sets of home grown funk to the lucky attendees.  2. The FoodThe NOLA Crawfish King himself, Chris “Shaggy” Davis, will be on hand to feed the crowd with his world famous crawfish boil. No stranger to music events, Shaggy has earned a reputation as the “Go to” source for anyone who wants to bring the spirit of New Orleans to their shows across the country. Ever since a fortuitous accident brought him to the city decades ago, Shaggy has worked to unite the community through his lovingly prepared boil.  Using the freshest ingredients and an on-site boiler system, Shaggy will be overseeing the preparation of thousands of pounds of tasty crawfish and fixings for the crowd.  The best part?  The incredible feast is included in the ticket price, and you’ll find yourself bellying up to the buffet tables next to fellow fans and musicians alike.NOLA’s Crawfish King Is Cooking Up A Whole New Festival3. The BeerThanks to the NOLA Crawfish Festival host, the NOLA Brewery, there’s no worries about running out of tasty beverages to wash down all that scrumptious crawfish boil. The NOLA Brewery has earned a strong reputation for crafting a wide selection of year round offerings like ales, IPAs, stouts and special, seasonal concoctions that reflect the ingredients available during the different stages of the year. To help wash down all the wonderful food, there’s nothing better than an ice cold, hand crafted beer, and The NOLA Brewery is even crafting a special, limited edition signature brew to help wash down all the wonderful food that crowds will enjoy.4. The LocationThe city itself is more than just a backdrop for the NOLA Crawfish Festival; its laid back demeanor and round-the-clock celebration is the very ground on which the event is built. New Orleans is a hodgepodge of building styles that reflects the diverse heritage of its citizens. Countless homegrown legends have emerged from the Crescent City in nearly every genre, from funk to jazz to rock and beyond. And of course, there’s the city-wide commitment to gather together for practically any excuse to party at the drop of a hat! 5. The TimingThe saddest sounds you’ll ever hear in New Orleans during Jazz Fest are always the last notes of the night. The three days in-between the official event weekends usually leaves diehard music fans adrift during the daytime hours, with nothing to feed their cravings until the night-time shows.  With the arrival of the NOLA Crawfish Festival, those three days are a shining oasis of revelry.With all the wonderful reasons to attend, it’s hard to imagine a better way to spend the days between Jazz Fest weekend than listening to some of the finest in New Orleans music, bellying up to tables laden with some of the best crawfish boil in the world, and  washing it down with a variety of locally made craft beers. With the addition of the NOLA Crawfish Festival to the Jazz Fest season, it’s possible to spend ten straight days going around the clock in a magical musical marathon. Join the fun and get your tickets while they last HERE.You can enter to win tickets below!last_img read more

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For bigger data, more storage

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first_img Related As big data becomes a common analytical tool in fields from the sciences to the humanities, Harvard’s computer infrastructure experts are turning their attention to an increasingly pressing question: How do you manage it all?In recent years, Harvard invested in the Odyssey computing cluster, whose 60,000 CPUs provide the sheer computing horsepower needed to crunch big data.But as large data sets multiply, the question of where to put the information and how to seamlessly retrieve it for analysis has become increasingly important. In August, the National Science Foundation announced a grant of nearly $4 million over the next five years to develop the North East Storage Exchange (NESE), a collaboration among five area universities, including Harvard, to provide not just space for massive data sets, but also the high-speed infrastructure that allows it to be quickly retrieved for analysis.“People are downloading now 50 to 80 terabyte data sets from NCBI [the National Center for Biotechnology Information] and the National Library of Medicine over an evening. This is the new normal. People [are] pulling genomic data sets wider and deeper than they’ve ever been,” said James Cuff, Harvard’s assistant dean and distinguished engineer for research computing. “What used to be — in lab, in vivo, or in vitro practice — ‘cutting edge’ … are now standard old processes. PCR [polymerase chain reaction] was cutting edge at one point. Now it’s just a thing you do.”The institutions involved include Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University, Boston University, and the University of Massachusetts. They are taking on the project as an expansion of their existing high-performance computing collaboration. In 2012, the five institutions opened the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC). Located in Holyoke on a rehabilitated industrial site, MGHPCC provides state-of-the-art computing services and is home to part of Harvard’s Odyssey computer. The site was also designed to be energy-efficient and is largely run on hydropower and solar energy.MGHPCC President Richard McCullough, Harvard’s vice provost for research and professor of materials science and engineering, said the capacity the project will provide is badly needed, but the project is seen as more than a one-off effort. Lessons learned will help inform similar efforts elsewhere.“You just need more and more of these kinds of resources to be at the forefront of data science,” McCullough said. “This grant will keep us at the forefront, and may allow us to take a quantum leap forward. This is a really important win for us.” Cuff expects data retrieval from the North East Storage Exchange to be about 10 times faster than that from equivalent storage through private cloud-based servers, and McCullough said it will be cheaper too, just a fifth that of commercial vendors.Cuff, NESE’s principal investigator, said that officials hope to have more than 50 petabytes of storage capacity available at MGHPCC within the next five years, with the ability to expand it further. John Goodhue, MGHPCC’s executive director and a co-principal investigator of NESE, said he expects the speed of the connection to collaborating institutions to double or triple over the next few years.“What we’re building is an extendable architecture,” Cuff said.Though Cuff said NESE could be thought of as collaborating institutions’ private cloud, he doesn’t expect NESE to compete with commercial cloud storage providers. Rather, he said, researchers have a range of data storage options, which should be matched to their purpose. NESE, for example, could potentially back up its data to the cloud.“This isn’t a competitor to the cloud. It’s a complementary cloud storage system,” Cuff said.Cuff compared the NESE collaboration to the early days of the internet, when the communications needs of groups of institutions prompted them to create computer networks that grew increasingly interconnected. Now, the problem facing institutions around the country is how to manage the tidal wave of data being generated by researchers and the larger wave likely to break over them in the years to come.The collaboration depends on contributions from each institution, Cuff said, adding that the five-year effort is also an experiment in managing their needs in order to build the research computing infrastructure of the future.Despite all the effort, Goodhue and Cuff said, ultimately the goal is to make it invisible to the users.“There’s cost savings at every level, savings in the amount of time a researcher has to spend worrying about whether the data is OK and backed up properly,” Goodhue said. “Having something so easy to work with that you don’t even have to think about it is a goal too.” Across Harvard, programs and researchers are mining vast quantities of computerized information, sometimes revolutionizing their fields in the process Big data, massive potentiallast_img read more

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