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Saint Mary’s students celebrate Senior Week

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first_imgIn the week leading up to Commencement, seniors had the opportunity to participate in different activities to celebrate the traditions and sisterhood fostered at Saint Mary’s.The week is a time for students to have one more chance to spend time together as a class, senior class president CoCo Craig said.“It’s time for memories,” Craig said.According to Craig, the week began with a senior formal Sunday, followed by the Alumnae-Senior Champagne Brunch, yoga and scavenger hunt Monday.Senior class vice president Lindsay Rzepecki said the Class of 2016 participation in the Class Gift Campaign — in which each class tries to achieve 100 percent participation in raising money for Saint Mary’s — will be revealed, and the class’s gift will be presented to College President Carol Ann Mooney on Monday.Domerfest 2.0 and Babetostal were held on Tuesday, and the class took a trip Wednesday to Chicago for a Cubs baseball game at Wrigley Field.The main events of the week took place Thursday, Craig said, when students painted handprints in the underground tunnel that connects Le Mans Hall and the Saint Mary’s Student Center and participated in the Saint Mary’s tradition of Opening of the Circle. Additionally, they received their letters from the Letter Writing Project, had a party on the island in Lake Marian and had their final walk down the Avenue.“The Opening of the Circle is a tradition where the president of the class reads a script that basically prepares to send us off, but reminds us we are always welcome to come home,” Craig said. “The Letter Writing Project is a genius idea the Class of 2015 started. Friends, faculty and family write letters to students about the positive impact they have contributed.”The Opening of the Circle will be a time of reflection for the graduates, Rzepecki said.“Opening of the Circle will surely be a sentimental moment for all of us graduating seniors, as we participated in a very similar ceremony [Closing of the Circle] on our first day at Saint Mary’s,” she said. “We will reflect in prayer and join hands with our classmates.”Rzepecki said the week aimed to make memories for students to “carry with us as we move past the comfort of Saint Mary’s.”“Each memory, person, hardship and celebration has made our own personal Saint Mary’s story,” she said. “These unique and precious gifts are something we will not be able to relive, but they will live on. This is the opportunity to celebrate those memories with just us, and only us — the Class of 2016. It’s a time of celebration, and we certainly deserve it.”Senior Isabella Gagnon said in an email she was excited to spend her final days at Saint Mary’s with her classmates.“Senior Week has really allowed me to hang out with girls that I may not usually hang out with, that aren’t in the same major or clubs that I am,” Gagnon said. “It’s also an extra week that we get to pretend we aren’t about to be real adults. We can just … bond with our fellow Belles all week without the stress of finals.”Gagnon said she is looking forward to the Senior Letter Writing Project, as well as other events during the week.“I am excited for taking our final walk down the Avenue,” she said. “I’m pretty sure this is the part where I will start crying uncontrollably. … I want to get as much out of my Saint Mary’s experience as possible. I think it’s important to go to yoga classes and handprint paining to really do that. I’m not doing every Senior Week event, but I will make the best out of the ones I do go to.”Tags: Commencement 2016, saint mary’s, Senior Weeklast_img read more

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OpEd: Dean Martin’s Christmas Classics Reign Supreme

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Make way, Mariah Carey. Hit the road, Jose Feliciano. Bye-bye, Bing Crosby.Christmas is Dean Martin’s domain.Yes, winter is coming. But it need not be a season of unremitting gloom and doom. Let’s put aside our political differences and pandemic fears — at least for one day — and celebrate a festive Yuletide Saturnalia with Dean Martin, the King of Cool.And Long Island, which boasts a bevy of Dean Martin impressionists, is wall-to-wall Dino country.As Christmas crooners go, Dino Paul Crocetti evokes the warmth of a hearth fire on a snowy winter’s morn. Listening to his mellifluous Italianate baritone has long been a Christmas tradition in households around the world. From “Let It Snow” to “Marshmallow World” to “Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer,” Dean’s wintry melodies embody both the mirth and the majesty of the holiday season.Social distancing has made it difficult for families to congregate this year, but Dino’s rendition of “I’ll Be Home For Christmas,” will warm the cockles of even the most Scrooge-like relative’s heart. Not to mention Dean’s “Silver Bells.” And his melancholy “Blue Christmas” puts the Elvis Presley platter to shame.Throughout his fabled career, Dean Martin was no stranger to outperforming other musical stars. In 1964, he topped the Beatles’ “Heart Days Night” on the music charts with his smash single, “Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime.”In 1977, Dino sang a heartfelt “White Christmas” on his Christmas in California TV special. Afterward, Greg Garrison, Dean’s longtime producer-director, received a telephone call from Irving Berlin, who’d penned the iconic song long ago: “Mr. Garrison, I just want to tell you I just love your (show’s) star, and I want you to know that the White Christmas Dean did on the air was the best version I have ever heard.”So there, Der Bingle!And Dean Martin’s “Silent Night” is a reverential ode to the season’s spirituality.On the cheeky side of Christmas, Dino warbles “Baby It’s Cold Outside,” a saucy take on a snowbound couple’s duet of flirtation and love. Politically correct pundits who rail against this holiday classic are nothing more than modern-day Ebenezers.Manning a one-horse open sleigh, the Dean of Christmas takes us for a frolicsome trek through a winter wonderland in his jaunty version of “Jingle Bells.”At the 75th anniversary celebration of the NBC television network, comedian Bob Newhart poignantly praised Dean as “the most talented man” he’d ever known. Along with his films, which throughout the 1960s were never out of the top ten at the box office, Dean Martin hosted a TV variety show for nearly a decade — making him an American icon.During Apollo 7’s mission in space, Commander Wally Schirra echoed Dean Martin’s bon- homie by holding aloft a sign for all of Earth to see: “Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.”(It was Dino’s tag line, which he invoked at the end of his hourly variety show every Thursday night.)In truth, Dean Martin was a multi-threat entertainer whose image as a boozing bon vivant belied an artist of considerable range and diversity. Whether starring with John Wayne or Montgomery Clift in classic Hollywood films, recording smooth romantic ballads, or hosting one of television’s greatest programs, Dino Paul Crocetti achieved international stardom by holding true to his inner creative voice.When Howard Hawks needed a highly emotive actor to play the drunken deputy to Duke Wayne’s stolid sheriff in “Rio Bravo,” the last person he envisioned was the singing straight man of a disbanded comedy team. Yet Dino’s nuanced Oscar-caliber performance as the fallen lawman who reclaims his honor — and the respect of his peers — wowed the veteran director.Vincente Minelli, Billy Wilder and George Seaton also found Dean Martin to be a conscientious thespian whose cinematic appeal was equaled by a strong commitment to his craft.Though not a practitioner of the Stanislavski “Method,” Dean brought an uncommon emotional intensity to his roles. This is especially evident in such dramatic films as “Rio Bravo,” “The Young Lions,” “Some Came Running,” “Ada” and “Career.”Dino also delivers a powerful performance in the film adaptation of Lillian Hellman’s play, “Toys in the Attic.”Martin is superb as Captain Vernon Demarest, a debonair, nerves-of-steel airline pilot who must contend with a morose bomber aboard a flight to Rome in “Airport.” This film is as suspenseful today as it was in the movie theaters half a century ago.And in “Mr. Ricco,” his last starring movie role, Dean Martin plays a principled defense attorney who champions civil liberties and upholds the rule of law while solving a bizarre murder mystery.After a cozy Yuletide dinner — serenaded by Dino’s dulcet holiday tunes — kick back and relax with a classic Dean Martin film. Though he passed away on Christmas Day twenty-five years ago, Dean Martin remains evergreen in our hearts.Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.last_img read more

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COMMENTARY: What a season of high school sports it’s been

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first_imgEvery two weeks, Mike Mandell gives his thoughts on the sports scene in Ellsworth, Hancock County and beyond.Depending on whether you’re reading this online or in the newspaper, it’s either the very end of May or the first day of June. Either way, the end of the high school sports season is fast approaching.To say it’s been a fun one to follow would be a massive understatement. From the moment football and soccer kicked off in September to the closing innings of the baseball and softball regular seasons, there have been plays, achievements and teams we will never forget.One of the first games I covered for The Ellsworth American was a boys’ soccer game between Ellsworth and George Stevens Academy in September. In that game, Ellsworth came back from a 2-0 deficit to win 3-2 in overtime. After Colby Clarke scored the game-winner, the team sprinted to the hill on the opposite side of the field to celebrate with the student section.I’ll never forget the looks on the faces of both teams after that game. To borrow an old sports cliché, it showed every aspect of the “thrill of victory and the agony of defeat.” The raw emotions present on the field at Ellsworth High School that day were a reminder that, although a sporting event might be “just a game,” it can mean so much more.This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textPerhaps it was just a gut feeling, but I knew from that moment that the upcoming season was going to be a special one. That gut feeling was correct; fall brought about Bucksport football’s bounce-back season, state and regional titles for the GSA girls’ cross-country and boys’ soccer teams, respectively, and Mount Desert Island’s first Northern Maine football title.Winter brought basketball season, and with it came the excellence of the GSA boys’ basketball team. From Taylor Schildroth’s 61-point game to Jarrod Chase’s title-winning shot and everything in between, the Eagles were appointment viewing every time they took the court. It’s not easy to live up to the kind of hype GSA had before when the season began, but Dwayne Carter’s team answered the call every step of the way.The MDI boys did the exact same by winning their first Gold Ball since the school’s consolidation in 1968. On the girls’ side, GSA earned the No. 2 seed in Class C North and made it all the way to the regional title game. In the process, the Eagles ended a three-year hex of falling one game short of the Cross Insurance Center.Then, there was wrestling. Of all the unforgettable moments from this past sports season, the roar from the crowd and the tears in head coach Dan Ormsby’s eyes after Bucksport’s David Gross recorded a pin to win the state’s heavyweight title might be at the very top. As Bucksport fans celebrated afterward, the champ’s father said it best: “It doesn’t get better than this.” It’s hard to disagree.There have been other moments, too. The Ellsworth and MDI swim teams finished their seasons on high notes at the state championship meet in February, and it’s likely that at least a few Hancock County baseball, tennis and track teams will add to the list over the next two weeks. After all, playoff games and championship meets are where some of the best and most emotional stories are written.In a way, sports journalists aren’t the only people who write those stories. We do type, research and report them for all to see, but in order to find them, someone has to put them in motion. In sports, that “someone” can come in the form of a player, fan, coach or anyone else who defines what these events can bring to our daily lives.Before long, it will be time for football, soccer and cross-country again. In the endless cycle that is the world of sports, there are also endless opportunities. As long as sports stay around to influence who we are and what we do, so too will the stories they tell. Hospice volunteers help families navigate grief and find hope – September 12, 2020 Latest Posts MPA approves golf, XC, field hockey, soccer; football, volleyball moved to spring – September 10, 2020 Latest posts by Mike Mandell (see all)center_img Ellsworth runners compete in virtual Boston Marathon – September 16, 2020 Bio Mike MandellMike Mandell is the sports editor at The Ellsworth American and Mount Desert Islander. He began working for The American in August 2016. You can reach him via email at [email protected]last_img read more

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Criticism mounts on WADA decision in Russia doping case

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first_img Written By COMMENT READ | Bengaluru Brawlers Claim Surprise Win Over Punjab PanthersEarlier in the week, the chair of the British Olympic Association called for “the fullest possible sanctions to be taken against Russia at Tokyo 2020.”  It was the same stance that a majority of the WADA athlete committee took last weekend, before WADA executives met to rubber-stamp the recommendation that would allow Russians to compete as neutrals. The decision forced Aggar’s hand, and led her to release a statement saying WADA’s actions “have fundamentally shaken my belief in an organization that I felt initially served a great purpose in protecting the integrity of sports.” READ | Chess Wizard Anand Releases His Book ‘Mind Masters’The USOPC’s Athletes Advisory Council was among those supporting Aggar. “WADA’s decision to ignore the majority of its own Athlete Committee … is out of touch and the current sanctions will not be enough to cause significant change in Russia,” the AAC said in a statement. In an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday, WADA compliance chairman Jonathan Taylor said disallowing the Russian flag and its Olympic officials from the Tokyo Games, but not barring all its athletes, “was the appropriate line to draw.”READ | Woods Sits As International Expands Presidents Cup Lead WATCH US LIVE Last Updated: 14th December, 2019 10:37 IST Criticism Mounts On WADA Decision In Russia Doping Case Criticism of the World Anti-Doping Agency’s sanctions against Russia mushroomed with a rebuke from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee coming on the heels LIVE TV Criticism of the World Anti-Doping Agency’s sanctions against Russia mushroomed with a rebuke from the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee coming on the heels of the outraged resignation of a member of the WADA athlete committee. The USOPC and British Paralympian Victoria Aggar each expressed their disagreement with WADA’s decision not to issue a blanket ban on the Russians in wake of evidence that government officials doctored data that was supposed to be used to prosecute cases stemming from the country’s long-running doping scandal. Aggar, a Paralympic rower, announced her resignation from WADA’s athlete committee, saying “I simply can no longer be part of an organization that places politics over principle.”  Hours later at its quarterly meeting, the USOPC board debated the wisdom of sanctions that called for innocent athletes to be able to compete as neutrals at next year’s Olympics, even though determining who really is innocent has been made more difficult because of the data manipulation.READ | Sports Ministry Cancels Saturday’s GB Meeting Called By Chess Federation Presidentcenter_img Press Trust Of India SUBSCRIBE TO US First Published: 14th December, 2019 10:37 IST “It’s very difficult for us to see how justice can be served and how there will be a true deterrent versus future corruption if any of the athletes from Russia have a right to compete in Tokyo under any flag, neutral or otherwise,” USOPC chair Susanne Lyons said.”If the data truly has been corrupted … it’s very unclear how you can decide and siphon out who’s been part of the doping and who has not.”  FOLLOW USlast_img read more

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