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For bigger data, more storage

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first_img Related As big data becomes a common analytical tool in fields from the sciences to the humanities, Harvard’s computer infrastructure experts are turning their attention to an increasingly pressing question: How do you manage it all?In recent years, Harvard invested in the Odyssey computing cluster, whose 60,000 CPUs provide the sheer computing horsepower needed to crunch big data.But as large data sets multiply, the question of where to put the information and how to seamlessly retrieve it for analysis has become increasingly important. In August, the National Science Foundation announced a grant of nearly $4 million over the next five years to develop the North East Storage Exchange (NESE), a collaboration among five area universities, including Harvard, to provide not just space for massive data sets, but also the high-speed infrastructure that allows it to be quickly retrieved for analysis.“People are downloading now 50 to 80 terabyte data sets from NCBI [the National Center for Biotechnology Information] and the National Library of Medicine over an evening. This is the new normal. People [are] pulling genomic data sets wider and deeper than they’ve ever been,” said James Cuff, Harvard’s assistant dean and distinguished engineer for research computing. “What used to be — in lab, in vivo, or in vitro practice — ‘cutting edge’ … are now standard old processes. PCR [polymerase chain reaction] was cutting edge at one point. Now it’s just a thing you do.”The institutions involved include Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University, Boston University, and the University of Massachusetts. They are taking on the project as an expansion of their existing high-performance computing collaboration. In 2012, the five institutions opened the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC). Located in Holyoke on a rehabilitated industrial site, MGHPCC provides state-of-the-art computing services and is home to part of Harvard’s Odyssey computer. The site was also designed to be energy-efficient and is largely run on hydropower and solar energy.MGHPCC President Richard McCullough, Harvard’s vice provost for research and professor of materials science and engineering, said the capacity the project will provide is badly needed, but the project is seen as more than a one-off effort. Lessons learned will help inform similar efforts elsewhere.“You just need more and more of these kinds of resources to be at the forefront of data science,” McCullough said. “This grant will keep us at the forefront, and may allow us to take a quantum leap forward. This is a really important win for us.” Cuff expects data retrieval from the North East Storage Exchange to be about 10 times faster than that from equivalent storage through private cloud-based servers, and McCullough said it will be cheaper too, just a fifth that of commercial vendors.Cuff, NESE’s principal investigator, said that officials hope to have more than 50 petabytes of storage capacity available at MGHPCC within the next five years, with the ability to expand it further. John Goodhue, MGHPCC’s executive director and a co-principal investigator of NESE, said he expects the speed of the connection to collaborating institutions to double or triple over the next few years.“What we’re building is an extendable architecture,” Cuff said.Though Cuff said NESE could be thought of as collaborating institutions’ private cloud, he doesn’t expect NESE to compete with commercial cloud storage providers. Rather, he said, researchers have a range of data storage options, which should be matched to their purpose. NESE, for example, could potentially back up its data to the cloud.“This isn’t a competitor to the cloud. It’s a complementary cloud storage system,” Cuff said.Cuff compared the NESE collaboration to the early days of the internet, when the communications needs of groups of institutions prompted them to create computer networks that grew increasingly interconnected. Now, the problem facing institutions around the country is how to manage the tidal wave of data being generated by researchers and the larger wave likely to break over them in the years to come.The collaboration depends on contributions from each institution, Cuff said, adding that the five-year effort is also an experiment in managing their needs in order to build the research computing infrastructure of the future.Despite all the effort, Goodhue and Cuff said, ultimately the goal is to make it invisible to the users.“There’s cost savings at every level, savings in the amount of time a researcher has to spend worrying about whether the data is OK and backed up properly,” Goodhue said. “Having something so easy to work with that you don’t even have to think about it is a goal too.” Across Harvard, programs and researchers are mining vast quantities of computerized information, sometimes revolutionizing their fields in the process Big data, massive potentiallast_img read more

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White House begins talks with lawmakers on COVID-19 relief

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first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Top aides to President Joe Biden have begun talks with a group of moderate Senate Republicans and Democrats on Biden’s proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package. The talks come as Biden faces increasing headwinds in his effort to win bipartisan backing for the initial legislative effort of his presidency. Lawmakers on the right question the wisdom of racking up bigger deficits. Those on the left are urging Biden not to spend too much time on bipartisanship when the pandemic is killing thousands each day and costing more jobs. One key Republican, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, said afterward she would reconvene a bipartisan group to focus on “a more targeted package.”last_img

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CAR Interim President reshuffles cabinet ahead of general elections

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first_imgCentral African Republic interim president Catherine Samba-Panza had reshuffled her cabinet, less than two months before the country holds its general elections.Samba-Panza replaced the ministers for defence, rural development, youth, pubic security and justice.Her decision to reshuffle the cabinet came after two weeks of consultations in the wake of the inter-religious violence that killed at least 77 people in the capital Bangui in late September.In the shake-up announced late Thursday, Joseph Bindoumi, head of the Central African League of Human Rights, replaces Marie-Noelle Koraya as defence minister.Chrysostome Sambia, a general in the gendarmerie, will serve as public security minister, while Dominique Said Paguindji, who previously held that post, becomes minister of justice.last_img read more

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January 21, 2019 Police Blotter

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first_imgJanuary 21, 2019 Police Blotter012119 Decatur County EMS Report012119 Decatur County Fire Report012119 Decatur County Law Report012119 Decatur County Jail Report012119 Batesville Police Blotterlast_img

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Women’s World Cup 2019: USA’s Alex Morgan, Megan Rapinoe explain why they switched taking penalty kick

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first_imgThe United States’ match against Spain came down to an important penalty kick, but there was a change in plan when it came to which American would take the shot. After Rose Lavelle was fouled inside the box by Spain’s Virginia Torrecilla, star forward Alex Morgan stepped up and it looked like she was going to take the penalty kick. After a lengthy VAR review, however, she came back out and handed the ball to Megan Rapinoe.  The veteran, who had scored in the 7th minute off another penalty to Tobin Heath, stepped up and converted to give the U.S. a 2-1 lead in the 75th minute. It wasn’t clear at the time the reasoning behind the switch, but Morgan said after the game that it was a decision made by head coach Jill Ellis. Related News “We’ve practiced these a lot,” Rapinoe told reporters. “Obviously you can never replicate having a knockout round game on the line with it, but to be honest, I had given it to Alex in the beginning just because I took the first one and I thought we should switch it up.”And then they were like you’re first in line for a reason so just get back up there and take it. So I didn’t really feel a lot of pressure to begin with because I had a short wait. I just had to go from the sideline and take it.”After barely escaping with a win, the U.S. advances to face France in the quarterfinals Friday. Women’s World Cup 2019: 3 takeaways from USA’s close win over Spaincenter_img Women’s World Cup 2019: Full bracket, dates, times, TV channels, results for every match “We have the penalty takers and this actually hasn’t come up where we had two penalties in a game yet, so Rapinoe gave me the ball. But it’s ultimately the coach’s decision. The ball went back to Rapinoe and the ball went to the back of the net,” Morgan told Fox Sports.Same penalty taker, same result! 🇺🇸@mPinoe showing nerves of steel from the penalty spot! 💪 #FIFAWWC pic.twitter.com/4ykSp0SZvq— FOX Sports (@FOXSports) June 24, 2019With Rapinoe’s second goal, she became the second player in the Women’s World Cup history to score two penalties in one match. The only other player to reach that feat, ironically, was Spain’s Jennifer Hermoso. last_img read more

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Gerrit Cole ‘flattered’ by John Smoltz saying Astros rotation better than ’90s Braves: We have a ways to go

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first_img Chris Sale not optimistic umpire will be held accountable for missed calls: There’s nothing MLB is going to do Gerrit Cole was “flattered” by a comment from MLB legend John Smoltz, but wants to make sure the Astros don’t get ahead of themselves.Houston shocked the world Wednesday when it landed Diamondbacks ace Zack Greinke in a trade in the waning moments of the deadline and Smoltz was one of the first men to congratulate Astros owner Jim Crane in a phone call, via MLB.com. “Man, you really did a great job of putting that together,” Smoltz told Crane.”Yeah, it looks like (John) Smoltz, (Tom) Glavine and (Greg) Maddux,” Crane replied. Related News “No, no, you guys are way better than we ever were,” Smoltz said.Astros owner Jim Crane said John Smoltz called him today to gush about his rotation: “Smoltz said ‘Man, you really did a great job of putting that together.’ I said, ‘Yeah, it looks like Smoltz, Glavine and Maddux.’ He said, ‘No, no, you guys are way better than we ever were.'”— Brian McTaggart (@brianmctaggart) August 2, 2019It’s a huge compliment coming from a man not only connected to one of the best rotations of all time, but also a guy who was in one of the most epic pitching matchups ever with Jack Morris in Game 7 of the 1991 World Series.Smoltz had the best stuff in one of the best rotations ever, so for him to say Houston is better than that assortment of Hall of Famers (Smoltz-2015, Maddux-2014, Glavine-2014) is a heck of a statement.Again, Cole was absolutely flattered, but he was the first to pump the brakes on those comments.“Thank you, John, for that, but some of us have a little ways to go,” he said after Houston’s 9-0 win over the Mariners on Saturday. Cole upon hearing John Smoltz told Crane the Astros rotation is better than 1990s Braves: “Thank you, John, for that, but some of us have a little ways to go.” pic.twitter.com/ujwJIetBjN— Brian McTaggart (@brianmctaggart) August 4, 2019For what it’s worth, the Astros have four pitchers this season in the top 12 in ERA (Cole, Justin Verlander, Wade Miley, Greinke), three in the top five in WHIP (Cole, Verlander, Greinke) and four in the top 20 in WAR (Verlander, Cole, Greinke, Miley).Those are numbers tough to match for any rotation. The Braves came close though on multiple occasions and did it for a very long time. This Astros rotation as currently constructed could be over at the end of the year if the team doesn’t re-sign Cole and Miley.But for now, it has caught the attention of the best pitcher with the best stuff in one of the best rotations ever. That is something in and of itself.last_img read more

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