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Indian journalist refused entry on arrival in Lahore because she is on blacklist

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first_imgNews January 28, 2021 Find out more Follow the news on Pakistan Organisation News RSF_en April 21, 2021 Find out more News to go further Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalists PakistanAsia – Pacific center_img July 25, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Indian journalist refused entry on arrival in Lahore because she is on blacklist Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder June 2, 2021 Find out more News PakistanAsia – Pacific Help by sharing this information Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire Reporters Without Borders wrote to Pakistani foreign affairs minister Makhdoom Khusro Bakhtiar today voicing astonishment at the action of the authorities in refusing entry to Indian journalist Harider Baweja of the independent weekly Tehelka on her arrival at Lahore international airport (in the eastern province of Punjab) on 22 July although she had a valid seven-day visa. She was told she was on a blacklist.”Such archaic practices run counter to the Pakistani government’s commitment to new, peaceful relations in south Asia,” the press freedom organisation said. “Indian journalists must be able to visit Pakistan freely. We urge you to explain the reasons for this measure and to order the destruction of blacklists of journalists banned from entering your country.”An immigration official at Lahore airport told Baweja she was being refused entry because she was on a “visa violation” blacklist. She told Reporters Without Borders she had no idea why her name appeared on such a list. The immigration department, which comes under the interior ministry, declined to give her any further explanation. Foreign ministry officials denied that her name was on any list.Speaking to Reporters Without Borders from New Delhi, Baweja said she had visited Pakistan dozen of times in the past 15 years and did not understand why she was barred this time. “All countries have the right to refuse someone a visa, but Pakistan granted me one and I landed in Lahore with a valid visa,” she said.A Pakistani information ministry official responsible for relations with foreign journalists told Reporters Without Borders he knew nothing about Baweja’s case.In an earlier case, Sandhu Kanwar, an editor with the Hindustan Times daily newspaper, was denied entry in Lahore because of a visa problem, in September 2004. Receive email alertslast_img read more

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Why you need to save the date for CU FinHealth20!

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first_imgThe San Antonio Riverwalk continue reading » We are thrilled the announce the date and location of next year’s Credit Union FinHealth20 Conference! Mark your calendars for April 27th for the 5th annual conference in San Antonio, Texas! This is a joint conference between the Foundation, California and Nevada Credit Union Leagues and the Cornerstone Credit Union Foundation.Credit Union FinHealth brings together leading experts and practitioners in financial health to discuss how credit unions are measuring their members’ financial health, working to improve it and documenting the results. The conference also explores the connections between financial health, physical health, technology and advocacy.One of the three pillars of the Foundation’s work is to Ignite understanding, passion and focus on member financial health by providing tools and resources so credit unions are recognized as national financial health leaders. This conference is a way for us to do JUST that.Understanding people’s financial health benefits members, communities and drives growth for credit unions. Financial health is the future of credit unions’ relevance in the financial services marketplace.center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Cameroon athletes vanish from Commonwealth Games

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first_imgGold Coast, Australia | AFP | A total of eight athletes from conflict-hit Cameroon are now missing from the Commonwealth Games in Australia, team officials said Wednesday.Three weightlifters and two boxers were initially reported to Australian police after not being seen since Tuesday, triggering suspicion they had fled with no intention of returning to Cameroon.Cameroon press attache Simon Molombe told AFP the number of missing athletes had risen to eight — one third of the country’s 24-strong team.“It came as a complete surprise,” he said. “We have no idea where they are. The matter is in the hands of the police.“There were no worries this kind of thing might happen,” he insisted. “We continue to cooperate with the police.”Australian Border Force were searching for weightlifters Olivier Matam Matam, Arcangeline Fouodji and Petit David Minkoumba and boxers Ndzie Tchoyi and Simplice Fotsala after they apparently fled.Three more boxers have since vanished, sparking an Australian Border Force manhunt.Cameroon team manager Victor Agbor Nso told local media he had been in contact with the police.Commonwealth Games organisers called for competitors to respect the law, mindful of the fact that more than 100 athletes overstayed their visas at the 2000 Sydney Olympics. “We would appreciate them sticking within the law, enjoying themselves, but sticking within the law,” organising committee boss Peter Beattie told reporters.“That includes Cameroon and any other athletes. And if they are thinking of doing anything other, I would encourage them not to.”Before the Games opened on April 4, Australia’s Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton warned that athletes would be closely monitored to ensure they did not overstay their visas and that they returned home after competition ended.“It’s obviously disappointing that some athletes who have come to compete, didn’t compete as scheduled,” said Commonwealth Games Federation chief executive David Grevemberg.“It’s important to remember that these athletes are guests here in Australia at this time, they are still within their visas, they have a right to travel freely,” he added.“But this is obviously an issue that Team Cameroon is monitoring very, very closely.“Until it becomes a real issue in terms of visas and so forth we would obviously have to take that very seriously.”Cameroon, in central Africa, is suffering from civil unrest after a military crackdown on English-speaking separatists.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Five reasons the NBA is now afraid of Black Men

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first_imgIf that is the case, then NBA team owners are rightfully nervous. If Black professional athletes were to get even a whiff of the power that they truly possess, they’d be amazed at what they could do. Here are five reasons that the NBA now has good reason to fear Black men:1) The athletes have options: Unlike the NFL, there is a strong global market for well-branded professional basketball players. When I taught a class in China, I was amazed by the fact that every single boy in my class loved the game of basketball; every television in the cafeteria featured the NBA finals, and one of my students actually told me that every boy he knows plays basketball at least once a week. There are opportunities for players around the world, so most high quality players (except for the perpetually sad Delonte West, who is working in a hardware store) have something to do during the lockout. What’s even worse for team owners is that the longer the players spend time playing overseas, the more they may realize that it’s not such a terrible existence after all. As in any relationship (dating, professional, etc.), having options is almost always a good thing.2) They are not afraid: Wade’s blow up at Commissioner Stern has all the racial undertones of a scene from the movie “Roots.” The fact that Wade referred to Stern as “David” on multiple occasions also says that Wade is not interested in submitting to the standard social hierarchy that exists between Black men and wealthy White guys. When one puts intelligence, power, unity and courage all in the same room, you’ve got the socio-political equivalent of a nuclear bomb.3) They know how to work together: The fact that Wade conspired with LeBron James to play together in Miami says that these guys have risen above the divide-and-conquer mentality typically held among professional athletes. They communicate with one another and seem to have realized that joining forces gives them a tremendous amount of power both on and off the court. Historically, NBA labor negotiations have been heavily skewed in favor of team owners, who vote in lockstep on nearly every issue. By engaging in the same degree of collusion, Wade and his colleagues have tipped the scales back at least a little bit.4) They’re a lot more educated than they used to be: With the advent of the Internet, there has been an explosion in the sharing of ideas and information. It’s no longer cool for Black men to be ignorant, and athletes can not only reach the public on their own, but they also have unprecedented access to intellectual resources. By watching many of their predecessors end up broke and powerless, some (not all) NBA athletes come to the league equipped with the tools necessary to be successful in both life and sports. They realize that being financially and politically savvy are just as important as being able to dunk a basketball.5) They are principled and battle-hardened: Dwyane Wade (I’ve never met him) appears to be a battle-scarred man with a certain degree conscientiousness that goes above and beyond the size of his paycheck. I watched this single dad fight like hell for the right to see his sons, and in quite a few ways, Wade is openly defiant of nearly every stereotype the American public wants to have about Black men in America. The fact that he and James have already stated that they have no problem sitting out for an entire season serves as notice to NBA owners that by utilizing hard ball negotiating tactics, they are jeopardizing the existence and economic stability of the NBA.Beyond the financial implications of the NBA lockout negotiations lies a deeper and more serious display of racial dynamics at work. While team owners are still likely going to put the hammer on the heads of the athletes, we may see a dramatic shift in the athlete-owner paradigm. In the nervous eyes of NBA owners, this is the rise of the planet of the athletes.(Dr. Boyce Watkins is a professor at Syracuse University and founder of the Your Black World Coalition.) DR. BOYCE WATKINS by Dr. Boyce WatkinsFor New Pittsburgh Courier Many of us read with interest the blow up between NBA superstar Dwyane Wade and Commissioner David Stern. In a heated discussion taking place during the pending NBA lockout, Wade told Stern that he “isn’t his child,” and then stormed out of the meeting. I read about the interaction with curiosity, wondering whether or not I was witnessing the kind of revolt that hasn’t been seen among Black athletes since the 1960s.last_img read more

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