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Ghost Light Announces Dead & Company After-Party In Boulder

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first_imgSetlist: Ghost Light | Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom | Denver, CO | 3/30/19Set 1Best Kept Secret >Leave the Light On >Head Over Heels >*Isosceles >Synth Driver >Living on a Thin Line >Synth DriverSet 2Oh Darling, My DarlingBullseye Blues >I Dare You >Old Fashioned >I Dare You >Diamond Eyes >Bring it In close100 years ago >Beyond/before >^Best Kept SecretE: The Wild One >Diamond Eyes*Tears For Fears cover^Best Kept Secret teaseView SetlistGhost Light’s tour resumes later this week with stops in Austin, Dallas, and Houston, Texas. For a full list of upcoming dates, see below, and head to the band’s website for additional information.Ghost Light Tour4/4 – Austin, TX – Antone’s4/5 – Dallas, TX – Deep Ellum Art Company4/6 – Houston, TX – Last Concert Café4/9 – Fayetteville, AR – George’s Majestic Lounge4/10 – St. Louis, MO – Old Rock House4/11 – Columbus, OH – Woodlands Tavern4/12 – Louisville, KY – Zanzabar4/13 – Covington, KY – Madison Live4/16 – Nashville, TN – Basement East4/17 – Asheville, NC – Asheville Music Hall4/18 – Charleston, SC – Pour House4/20 – Charlotte, NC – Visulite Theatre4/24 – Birmingham, AL – Zydeco4/25 – Jackson, MS – Duling Hall4/27 – New Orleans, LA – Republic NOLA5/9 – Hamden, CT – Space Ballroom5/10 – Brooklyn, NY – Brooklyn Bowl5/11 – Portland, ME – Portland House of Music5/15 – Providence, RI – Columbus Theatre5/16 – Boston, MA – Paradise Rock Club5/17 – Asbury Park, NJ – Wonder Bar5/18 – Washington, DC – The Hamilton5/19 – Corolla, NC – Mike Dianna’s Grill Room5/24 – 5/26 – Long Creek, SC – Long Creek Music Festival5/24 – 5/26 – Chillicothe, IL – Summer Camp Music Festival5/25 – Martinsville, VA – Rooster Walk Music & Arts Festival6/6 – 6/8 – Wellston, MI – Camp Greensky Music Festival6/6 – 6/9 – Stephentown, NY – Disc Jam6/27 – 6/30 – Rothbury, MI – Electric Forest Festival7/5 – Boulder, CO – Boulder Theater7/18 – 7/21 – North Plains, OR – Northwest String Summit7/20 – Roseberry, ID – Summer Music Festival at Roseberry7/25 – 7/28 – Scranton, PA – Peach Music Festival7/26 – 7/27 – Burlington, VT – Tumble Down Festival8/2 – Johnstown, PA – Flood City Music FestivalView Tour Dates Following a successful weekend in Colorado, Ghost Light announced their return to The Centennial State for a special late-night performance on July 5th. The relatively new band will take over the Boulder Theater after Dead & Company wrap up their Friday show at Folsom Field. Tickets to Ghost Light’s late-night show go on sale this coming Friday at 10 am local time and can be purchased via the band’s website.Over the weekend, Ghost Light closed our their four-night Colorado run with a sold-out show at Cervantes Masterpiece Ballroom. In addition to performing their original material from their recently released debut record, Best Kept Secrets, the group–comprised of Holly Bowling, Tom Hamilton, Raina Mullen, Scotty Zwang, and Dan Africano–included a fun-filled cover of “Head Over Heels” by Tears For Fears.Thanks to technology, you can watch the full show stream below:Ghost Light | Denver, CO | 3/30/19last_img read more

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For bigger data, more storage

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first_img Related As big data becomes a common analytical tool in fields from the sciences to the humanities, Harvard’s computer infrastructure experts are turning their attention to an increasingly pressing question: How do you manage it all?In recent years, Harvard invested in the Odyssey computing cluster, whose 60,000 CPUs provide the sheer computing horsepower needed to crunch big data.But as large data sets multiply, the question of where to put the information and how to seamlessly retrieve it for analysis has become increasingly important. In August, the National Science Foundation announced a grant of nearly $4 million over the next five years to develop the North East Storage Exchange (NESE), a collaboration among five area universities, including Harvard, to provide not just space for massive data sets, but also the high-speed infrastructure that allows it to be quickly retrieved for analysis.“People are downloading now 50 to 80 terabyte data sets from NCBI [the National Center for Biotechnology Information] and the National Library of Medicine over an evening. This is the new normal. People [are] pulling genomic data sets wider and deeper than they’ve ever been,” said James Cuff, Harvard’s assistant dean and distinguished engineer for research computing. “What used to be — in lab, in vivo, or in vitro practice — ‘cutting edge’ … are now standard old processes. PCR [polymerase chain reaction] was cutting edge at one point. Now it’s just a thing you do.”The institutions involved include Harvard, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Northeastern University, Boston University, and the University of Massachusetts. They are taking on the project as an expansion of their existing high-performance computing collaboration. In 2012, the five institutions opened the Massachusetts Green High Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC). Located in Holyoke on a rehabilitated industrial site, MGHPCC provides state-of-the-art computing services and is home to part of Harvard’s Odyssey computer. The site was also designed to be energy-efficient and is largely run on hydropower and solar energy.MGHPCC President Richard McCullough, Harvard’s vice provost for research and professor of materials science and engineering, said the capacity the project will provide is badly needed, but the project is seen as more than a one-off effort. Lessons learned will help inform similar efforts elsewhere.“You just need more and more of these kinds of resources to be at the forefront of data science,” McCullough said. “This grant will keep us at the forefront, and may allow us to take a quantum leap forward. This is a really important win for us.” Cuff expects data retrieval from the North East Storage Exchange to be about 10 times faster than that from equivalent storage through private cloud-based servers, and McCullough said it will be cheaper too, just a fifth that of commercial vendors.Cuff, NESE’s principal investigator, said that officials hope to have more than 50 petabytes of storage capacity available at MGHPCC within the next five years, with the ability to expand it further. John Goodhue, MGHPCC’s executive director and a co-principal investigator of NESE, said he expects the speed of the connection to collaborating institutions to double or triple over the next few years.“What we’re building is an extendable architecture,” Cuff said.Though Cuff said NESE could be thought of as collaborating institutions’ private cloud, he doesn’t expect NESE to compete with commercial cloud storage providers. Rather, he said, researchers have a range of data storage options, which should be matched to their purpose. NESE, for example, could potentially back up its data to the cloud.“This isn’t a competitor to the cloud. It’s a complementary cloud storage system,” Cuff said.Cuff compared the NESE collaboration to the early days of the internet, when the communications needs of groups of institutions prompted them to create computer networks that grew increasingly interconnected. Now, the problem facing institutions around the country is how to manage the tidal wave of data being generated by researchers and the larger wave likely to break over them in the years to come.The collaboration depends on contributions from each institution, Cuff said, adding that the five-year effort is also an experiment in managing their needs in order to build the research computing infrastructure of the future.Despite all the effort, Goodhue and Cuff said, ultimately the goal is to make it invisible to the users.“There’s cost savings at every level, savings in the amount of time a researcher has to spend worrying about whether the data is OK and backed up properly,” Goodhue said. “Having something so easy to work with that you don’t even have to think about it is a goal too.” Across Harvard, programs and researchers are mining vast quantities of computerized information, sometimes revolutionizing their fields in the process Big data, massive potentiallast_img read more

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Mandate roundup: IPE-Quest, Ircantec, Unigestion

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first_imgThe closing date for applications is 21 October.In other news, France’s Ircantec has made an undisclosed investment in Unigestion’s Risk Managed European Equities strategy following the pension fund’s decision to increase exposure to low-volatility equities.Following a comprehensive market review, it said it selected Unigestion for its risk-management expertise and ability to manage equity strategies.Caroline Le Meaux, who manages administration and financial management at Ircantec, cited in particular Unigestion’s “combination of a structured and systematic portfolio construction process with exhaustive risk analysis.”If you have any questions regarding the IPE-Quest search, please email [email protected] Questions will not be accepted after 16 October. For full information, please go to http://www.ipe-quest.com/search.htm. An undisclosed industry-wide pension fund based in Europe has tendered a $250m (€197m) European or US all-cap/large-cap equity mandate using IPE-Quest.According to search QN1461, the investor is looking for an asset manager that can replicate the MSCI USA Equal Weight index “as closely as possible”. The investor intends to invest in a segregated mandate, but asset managers that offer only funds may also participate.Interested parties should have at least $1bn in assets under management, stating performance – gross of fees – to the end of June.last_img read more

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USC partners with India conference on soft power

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first_imgWorld Travel: Austin Maddox, a journalism fellow of the Center on Public Diplomacy, captures content on her phone for a video CPD plans to release this semester. (Amara Aguilar)It’s a hot December day in New Delhi, India, and Amara Aguilar is in a room with a travel blogger, a few international ambassadors, various diplomats and a videogame designer, giving a lecture on making GIFs. Aguilar attended India’s first major conference in December on soft power, the use of cultural and economic influence to appeal to other countries, rather than the use of military power, which invited USC’s Center on Public Diplomacy as a primary academic partner. The two-day conference included panels, workshops and performances and brought together diplomats, scholars and experts from around the world.Aguilar, an associate professor in the Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism, kicked off the conference with her workshop: “Soft Power Through Digital Storytelling.” Aguilar, a CPD faculty fellow who conducts digital training for the Center, said her workshop aimed to empower individuals to share their country’s stories through social media.“It was a really great trip overall,” said Aguilar. “[CPD] is always amazing to work with.” Participants in Aguilar’s workshop learned to make videos and GIFs that covered a wide range of topics like travel, tourism, literature and art and discussed the best ways to engage audiences visually.“All of these topics are really important for people to be able to tell their stories, so other people can understand the country and the people of the country,” Aguilar said. “In your pocket you have your mobile device, which is a powerful tool to create really compelling content at little or no cost.”Aguilar said CPD excels at recognizing the importance of social media and data as tools of public diplomacy, something not everyone has caught onto yet. Austin Maddox, a CPD student fellow, attended the conference as a video journalist and reported live from USC’s Instagram story. The first-year graduate student in the School of Journalism spent her time at the conference collecting B-roll and interviewing attendees for videos that CPD plans to release later this semester.Of the people that Maddox interviewed, she said Gopi Kallayil, Google’s chief evangelist of brand marketing, stood out as a favorite. Part of Kallayil’s work aims to combine spirituality and technology through the practice of yoga.                         “He’s brought yoga to 80 percent of all Google offices,” Maddox said. “I thought he was really cool and insightful … [his work] is something that I, personally, and I know a lot of my friends deal with in our lives; trying to maintain a center while still engaging in technology.”Jay Wang, the director of CPD, spoke on a panel called “Public Diplomacy, Successes and Challenges in National Building.” Wang spoke about the importance of technology as a tool for public diplomacy, but also some of the challenges.“We don’t have the playbook as we enter into this new era of how we engage with international publics,” Wang said. “Because the scale of change is so big, it presents a huge challenge for us to have a firm grasp of what’s happening in the technological field, and what are the implications for our practices.” Wang said one of CPD’s focuses is professional training and education, which Aguilar assists with often. While CPD has traveled to numerous countries, it will be holding its first international training session in Brussels next month, called “Technology, Storytelling & Public Diplomacy.” The workshop will focus on the integration of data and technology as tools of public diplomacy. Wang said the conference in New Delhi was significant because CPD had yet to travel to India. As a “leading academic center” in the field of public diplomacy, Wang said it was important for CPD to partner with India’s first conference on soft power. “On campus, many, I don’t think, really know the center exists, but the center’s work in this field is very well recognized in Washington D.C. and increasingly in many other countries,” Wang said.Maddox said one of her goals for this semester as a student fellow is to engage USC students with CPD’s work. “[CPD] values the student perspective,” Maddox said. “[Public diplomacy] is something that young people around the world would be interested in. It just needs to be presented in a way that they can understand.”last_img read more

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