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RTS Flexible Systems

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first_imgRTS Flexible Systems (Irlam, Manchester) a provider of integrated robotic and automation systems for the food industry, has developed a solution for picking and packing food products into variety packs.The system can also be adapted to cope with changes in pack configuration due to the introduction of new flavours or ’limited-edition’ offers.The solution was originally developed for a chocolate biscuit manufacturer. It used RTS’ PixCell TM technology to combine the speed and flexibility of 120-cycle per minute, vision-guided robots with RTS VIP TMline balancing software and RTS-developed gripper designs.According to David Bradford, RTS managing director: “We were able to achieve significant cost savings by replacing a complex and repetitive manual operation to pack multiple product variants with an automated solution.This significantly increases throughput and reduces line downtime. It has the advantage of improved quality control, and there are benefits for hygiene and personnel health because of the reduction in human intervention.”last_img read more

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Andy Frasco & The U.N. Adds String Cheese Incident, Galactic, The Motet Members To NOLA Late-Night

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first_imgAndy Frasco & The U.N. has announced a number of high-profile special guests for their late-night performance in New Orleans during Jazz Fest. The show, which will take place on Sunday, May 5th at the Frenchmen Street club, The Maison, will now feature Jason Hann (String Cheese Incident), Lyle Divinsky (The Motet), Maurice Brown (Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals), Shamarr Allen (Galactic), Mike Dillon, and DJ Williams (Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe).Naturally, the guests Frasco has tapped for the late-night are all seasoned veterans of the live music circuit. Jason Hann is one of the most talented percussion players in the world. As a long-time member of the seminal jam band, the String Cheese Incident, Hann’s creativity and precision as a percussionist are both integral to the band’s sound. Similarly dynamic and wildly talented as a percussionist, NOLA local and Garage A Trois member Mike Dillon will also be on hand as a special guest.Lyle Divinsky has cemented himself as one of the best and most reliable male vocalists in the live music community since joining The Motet in 2016. Maurice Brown is simply an incredible trumpet player. Currently on tour with Anderson .Paak & The Free Nationals, Brown has previously toured with Tedeschi Trucks Band, as well as with a series of notable rappers and jazz musicians. Brown will play alongside fellow trumpet player, Galactic member and New Orleans native, Shamarr Allen. Allen has collaborated and toured with many iconic musicians, such as Willie Nelson, Patti LaBelle, Harry Connick Jr., and Lenny Kravitz, to name a few.Guitarist D.J. Williams is a secret weapon of sorts. Often flying under the radar, Williams is a wildly talented guitarist. After honing his craft for years as a member of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, and now as a bandleader with his “Shots Fired” project, Williams has emerged as one of the most talented guitarists in live music today.With all of these guests added to the show, Andy Frasco & The U.N. at The Maison just got a whole lot crazier. Tickets are already on sale via Eventbrite. For a full list of L4LM’s Jazz Fest late-night schedule, click here.last_img read more

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Coelacanth genome surfaces

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first_imgAn international team of researchers has decoded the genome of a creature whose evolutionary history is both enigmatic and illuminating: the African coelacanth. A sea-cave dwelling, 5-foot-long fish with limblike fins, the coelacanth was once thought to be extinct. A living coelacanth was discovered off the African coast in 1938, and since then, questions about these ancient-looking fish have loomed large.Coelacanths today closely resemble the fossilized skeletons of their ancestors of more than 300 million years ago. Their genome confirms what many researchers had long suspected: Genes in coelacanths are evolving more slowly than in other organisms.“We found that the genes overall are evolving significantly slower than in every other fish and land vertebrate that we looked at,” said Jessica Alföldi, a research scientist at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT and co-first author of a paper on the coelacanth genome, which appears in Nature this week. “This is the first time that we’ve had a big enough gene set to really see that.”Researchers hypothesize that this slow rate of evolution may be because coelacanths simply have not needed to change: They live primarily off the Eastern African coast (a second coelacanth species lives off the coast of Indonesia), at ocean depths where relatively little has changed over the millennia.“We often talk about how species have changed over time,” said Kerstin Lindblad-Toh, scientific director of the Broad Institute’s vertebrate genome biology group and senior author. “But there are still a few places on earth where organisms don’t have to change, and this is one of them. Coelacanths are likely very specialized to such a specific, non-changing, extreme environment — it is ideally suited to the deep sea just the way it is.”Because of their resemblance to fossils dating back millions of years, coelacanths today are often referred to as “living fossils” — a term coined by Charles Darwin. But the coelacanth is not a relic of the past brought back to life: It is a species that has survived, reproduced, but changed very little in appearance for millions of years. “It’s not a living fossil; it’s a living organism,” said Alföldi. “It doesn’t live in a time bubble; it lives in our world, which is why it’s so fascinating to find out that its genes are evolving more slowly than ours.”The coelacanth genome has also allowed scientists to test other long-debated questions. For example, coelacanths possess some features that look oddly similar to those seen only in animals that dwell on land, including “lobed” fins, which resemble the limbs of four-legged land animals (known as tetrapods). Another odd-looking group of fish known as lungfish possesses lobed fins, too. It is probable that one of the ancestral lobed-finned fish species gave rise to the first four-legged amphibious creatures to climb out of the water and up onto land, but until now, researchers could not determine which of the two was the likelier candidate.In addition to sequencing the full genome — nearly 3 billion “letters” of DNA — from the coelacanth, the researchers also looked at RNA content from the coelacanth (both the African and Indonesian species) and from the lungfish. This information allowed them to compare genes in use in the brain, kidneys, liver, spleen, and gut of lungfish with gene sets from coelacanths and 20 other vertebrate species. Their results suggested that tetrapods are more closely related to lungfish than to the coelacanth.However, the coelacanth is still a critical organism to study to understand what is often called the water-to-land transition. The lungfish may be more closely related to land animals, but its genome remains inscrutable: At 100 billion letters in length, the lungfish genome is simply too unwieldy for scientists to sequence, assemble, and analyze. The coelacanth’s more modest genome (comparable in length to our own) is yielding valuable clues about the genetic changes that may have allowed tetrapods to flourish on land.By looking at what genes were lost when vertebrates came on land as well as what regulatory elements — parts of the genome that govern where, when, and to what degree genes are active — were gained, the researchers made several unusual discoveries:Sense of smell. The team found that many regulatory changes influenced genes involved in smell perception and detecting airborne odors. They hypothesize that as creatures moved from sea to land, they needed new means of detecting chemicals in the environment around them.Immunity. The researchers found a significant number of immune-related regulatory changes when they compared the coelacanth genome to the genomes of land animals. They hypothesized that these changes may have been part of a response to new pathogens encountered on land.Evolutionary development. Researchers found several key genetic regions that may have been “evolutionarily recruited” to form tetrapod innovations such as limbs, fingers and toes, and the mammalian placenta. One of these regions, known as HoxD, harbors a particular sequence that is shared across coelacanths and tetrapods. It is likely that this sequence from the coelacanth was co-opted by tetrapods to help form hands and feet.Urea cycle. Fish get rid of nitrogen by excreting ammonia into the water, but humans and other land animals quickly convert ammonia into less-toxic urea using the urea cycle. Researchers found that the most important gene involved in this cycle has been modified in tetrapods.The coelacanth genome may hold other clues for researchers investigating the evolution of tetrapods. “This is just the beginning of many analyses on what the coelacanth can teach us about the emergence of land vertebrates, including humans, and, combined with modern empirical approaches, can lend insights into the mechanisms that have contributed to major evolutionary innovations,” said Chris Amemiya, a member of the Benaroya Research Institute and co-first author of the Nature paper. Amemiya is also a professor at the University of Washington.Sequencing the full coelacanth genome was uniquely challenging for many reasons. Coelacanths are an endangered species, so samples available for research are almost nonexistent. This meant that each sample obtained was precious: Researchers would have “one shot” at sequencing the collected genetic material, according to Alföldi. But the difficulties of obtaining a sample and the challenges of sequencing it also knit the community together.Although the coelacanth genome offers some tantalizing answers, the research team anticipates that further study of the fish’s immunity, respiration, physiology, and more will lead to deep insights into how some vertebrates adapted to life on land, while others remained creatures of the sea.last_img read more

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Isolation routine: Jurgen Klopp settles for movies and dance

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first_img Loading… Jurgen Klopp says he has spent his time in self-isolation watching the Taken trilogy and trying to dance like Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain. The Premier League season is currently on hold until April 30 at the earliest due to the coronavirus pandemic. The British government has enforced strident measures to try and halt the spread of the virus, insisting that people must stay at home as much as possible. And while Klopp is desperate for football to return, he has called on the public to be “disciplined” in the wider fight against COVID-19. “I didn’t cut the grass but I tried the dance of Ox!” he told Liverpool’s official website when asked what he has been doing. Liverpool celebration party in corona limboAdvertisement “Not as bad as you probably think! It’s very important in these times that we all show we take this situation seriously, but we are human beings. At the moment we are at home and when you are at home, you cannot do something to help outside. “We are not health workers, we don’t work in a supermarket. You have to keep your own mood up and you have to keep the mood up for other people. “If the boys do anything on Instagram, as long as it’s in a legal frame I’m overly happy about it – it just shows they are still cheeky and all that stuff. I like it, I like it a lot. I like the line-ups they do. All these things are really funny. It’s good. “I watched a few movies – I watched the Taken trilogy again! To be honest, that’s how it is – you do a lot of things you usually don’t do. I’m still in that period. Two weeks is long but it’s not that long.” Read AlsoKlopp says Liverpool spirits are high despite virus lockdown “We said it now often enough and I think everybody knows, football is not the most important thing in the world. One hundred per cent not. In this moment it’s clear what is. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content7 Breathtaking Train Stations Around The GlobeWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?Couples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?6 Incredibly Strange Facts About Hurricanes7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your MindBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeGeeky And Hilarious Shower Curtains For Adults7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend BetterBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Madelast_img read more

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WAUG: Uniport Promises Memorable Games

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first_imgLale said the institution places high premium on sports which is why it has invested heavily in facilities and equipment, “we are the first University in West Africa to construct the new Myrtha swimming pool technology, we have consistently remained the number one university in sports in Nigeria and West Africa. We currently host the only IAAF/CAC High Performance Center for English speaking West African countries where athletes participating in major games and championships receive coaching tutorials’’Lale urged government at all levels, corporate Nigeria and philanthropists to join hands with the university to host the best WAUG ever in Nigeria.WAUG is the gathering of the best brains in West Africa, tomorrow’s leaders who combine academic and sporting excellence. Hosting a well-organized and successful game will make participants leave Nigeria with a positive impression which will shape their perception of Nigeria forever.Lale also argued that investment in sports will boost the economy, engage youths, curb crime and boost tourism.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram The host of the next edition of West African University Games (WAUG), University of Port Harcourt, has promised to organise a memorable game that will set standards for future editions. The institution also called on government at all levels, Corporate Nigeria and philanthropists to support the school in her bid to host the best WAUG ever.A statement by the university’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Ndowa Lale, said winning the right to host the games called for meticulous planning and painstaking execution so as to pull off a memorable competition that would further confirm Uniport’s standing as the undisputed masters of sports on the West African coast.Professor Lale said Uniport has a rich pedigree of hosting successful games which dates back to 1988 when the university hosted the 1988 edition of the Nigerian Universities Games Association (NUGA), and hosting the nation tertiary games again in 2004.last_img read more

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