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Duke, Tennessee, UConn, N.C. top seeds

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first_imgDuke, Tennessee, Connecticut and North Carolina were selected Monday as the No. 1 seeds for the women’s NCAA tournament. The Blue Devils, who went 29-0 in the regular season and then lost to N.C. State in the Atlantic Coast Conference tournament semifinals, will open up against No. 16 Holy Cross on Sunday in Raleigh. With a regional in Greensboro, Duke would stay in North Carolina until the Final Four in Cleveland. Duke, ranked atop the AP Poll for the final nine weeks, hopes for better results than the last time the Blue Devils finished No. 1 – the 2003-04 final poll. They lost to Minnesota in the regional finals that season. Others in the Greensboro regional include No. 8 Temple vs. No. 9 Nebraska, No. 4 Rutgers vs. No. 12 East Carolina, No. 5 Michigan State vs. No. 12 Delaware, No. 6 Louisville vs. No. 11 Brigham Young, No. 3 Arizona State vs. No. 14 UC Riverside, No. 7 Bowling Green vs. No. 10 Oklahoma State, and No. 2 Vanderbilt vs. No. 15 Delaware State. In the West, LSU, which saw Coach Pokey Chatman abruptly resign last Wednesday, is seeded No. 3 in the Fresno region. The Tigers will play UNC Asheville on Saturday night in Austin, Texas with acting head coach Bob Starkey at the helm. Defending champion Maryland will face Ivy League champion Harvard on Sunday afternoon in Hartford. The 64-team tournament begins Saturday. “We’re really excited. We’re playing all year long, hoping to get a chance to stay in Raleigh and stay in Greensboro, which is about an hour and 15 minutes down the road,” Duke coach Gail Goestenkors said. center_img Maryland, which returned all five starters from last season’s team, was 0-5 against Duke and North Carolina this season. The Terps are looking to become the first repeat champions since Connecticut won three consecutive from 2002-04. “The only team that’s going into the tournament knowing they can win it is Maryland, ’cause they’ve won it, and they’ve got a lot of the players back from the team that won it,” Connecticut coach Geno Auriemma said. West No. 1 seed Connecticut (29-3) will play No. 16 UMBC on Sunday in Hartford. If they advance past the first two rounds, the Huskies then must travel to Fresno for the regionals. During its run of five national championships since 1995, Connecticut hasn’t been farther West than Kansas City. The Huskies eventually could face No. 2 Stanford, which opens up at home against No. 15 Idaho State. The sentimental choice in Fresno might be North Carolina State and coach Kay Yow. The Wolfpack, which has won 11 of the 13 games since Yow returned after breast cancer treatments, is the No. 4 seed in Fresno. It will play Robert Morris on Sunday in the first round. Also in the West bracket, it will be: No. 5 Baylor vs. No. 12 Chattanooga, No. 6 Xavier vs. No. 11 West Virginia, and No. 7 Old Dominion vs. No. 10 Florida State. North Carolina, which won the ACC tournament, earned a No. 1 seed for the third consecutive season and will open Sunday against Prairie View. The Tar Heels are the top seed in the Dallas region. Other games in the region include No. 8 California vs. No. 9 Notre Dame, No. 5 George Washington vs. No. 12 Boise State, No. 4 Texas A&M vs. No. 13 Texas-Arlington, No. 6 Iowa State vs. No. 11 Washington, No. 3 Georgia vs. No. 14 Belmont, No. 7 Georgia Tech vs. No. 10 DePaul, and No. 2 Purdue vs. No. 15 Oral Roberts. Six-time champion Tennessee is now the only team that has competed in every NCAA tournament after Louisiana Tech didn’t make the field this year. The Lady Vols, a No. 1 seed for the 17th time in 20 years, will open up Sunday against No. 16 Drake in Pittsburgh. The No. 8 Panthers will host No. 9 James Madison in the other game in that subregional. Other games in the Dayton regional include: No. 5 Middle Tennessee, which has won 26 consecutive games, vs. No. 12 Gonzaga; No. 4 Ohio State vs. No. 13 Marist; No. 6 Marquette vs. No. 11 Louisiana-Lafayette; No. 3 Oklahoma vs. No. 14 Southeast Missouri State; and No. 7 Mississippi vs. No. 10 TCU. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Lawmakers Not Giving Up on GSE Reform

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Climate Change Will Change the Work of Nonprofits

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first_imgShare52Tweet5Share30Email87 Shares“Thorpe Marsh Power Station.” Credit: underclassrising.netApril 13, 2017; CNN, “Health”It’s no secret that industrialization has created a number of public health concerns, such as air and water pollution, and chemical contamination of food and soil. But have we considered that global warming may have equally catastrophic effects?A report from the Medical Society Consortium on Climate and Health mapped how climate change threatens the health of people across the United States and how those threats vary by region.As President Trump attempts to curb both federal environmental regulations and Americans’ federal guarantees of access to healthcare, it may be worth considering that the future public health environment will look different from what we see today.Rising temperatures, rising shorelines, increases in flooding and other weather events, wildfires, and air quality reduction will impact millions of people. An EPA report concluded that policies to prevent a 2˚ Celsius rise in global temperatures could save 12,000 lives in the next 80 years just from extreme heat and cold. The WHO estimates that 12.6 million people already die each year from unhealthy environments, or 1 in 4 global deaths.In New England and other coastal areas, rising oceans and rainfall means wetter, hotter environments, where mosquitoes love to grow. Already, outbreaks of Zika, West Nile virus, and other mosquito-borne diseases are popping up in the U.S.; other contaminations to food or water are also a possibility. Other regions of the country face the opposite problem; the National Academies of Science, Engineering, & Medicine estimated that the southwestern U.S. could see a 12 percent reduction in river and stream water with just a 1˚C rise in temperature.You may have noticed that your allergies are getting worse in recent years. Well, that’s because ragweed and other pollen-producing plants that flourish in hot weather now experience longer growing seasons, and even grow more robustly when there is more CO2 for them to process. (After all, it’s plant food!) According to the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, “When exposed to warmer temperatures and higher levels of CO2, plants grow more vigorously and produce more pollen than they otherwise would.” In addition, increased levels of ozone and CO2 reduce general air quality, causing higher levels of respiratory and other illnesses.It’s not just allergen-producing plants that are affected by CO2; the plants we eat are affected by it as well, and not in a good way. According to National Geographic, crops that use the C3 type of photosynthesis—a group that includes rice, wheat, peas, and soybeans—have reduced levels of zinc, protein, and iron when grown in high-CO2 environments. Two billion people, or one-quarter of the world’s population, get 60 percent of their zinc and iron through eating these crops that are now increasing their production of carbohydrates at the expense of these essential nutrients. The Gates foundation and USAID have been able to breed cultivars that are more resistant to nutrient depletion, but yields are lower, so it doesn’t entirely solve the problem of shortages.That’s a problem for Americans, but it’s a bigger problem for people in developing countries. Scientists estimate that areas of northern Africa in and around the Sahel and Sahara deserts will become uninhabitable in the summer months. Countries like Chad, Sudan, Morocco, Botswana, and others will lose huge amounts of inhabitable land. Seventy percent of Sudanese people rely on agriculture for their livelihood, but increased desertification due to climate change is rapidly reducing the amount of available, arable land. NPQ documented how a dearth of clean water in Chad led to an outbreak of Hepatitis E already this year. In addition, northern African countries rely on their production of cotton, sorghum, millet, peanuts, and sugarcane to sustain their economies, which may become impossible if growing conditions change.If the migrant crisis from North Africa is bad now, it will only be worse when large swathes of the area become uninhabitable. Crowding in refugee camps is an indirect effect of climate change, but it’s one that is known to have detrimental health effects for millions of people. Even if, as in the United States, people who are displaced by natural events like floods or fires don’t end up in refugee camps, they still suffer mental health wounds. Dr. Mona Sarfaty, director of the program on climate and health at George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication, says, “When people are displaced from their homes because of floods or extreme storms…this loss of home and separation from family and community leads to mental health impacts that can be reflected in substance abuse, alcoholism, domestic strife or violence, depression or anxiety.”So what can nonprofits do? In the face of rising public health threats, preparation and preventative care needs may change as risk factors alter; as nimble organizations that respond to public needs, nonprofits may see a change in what is asked of them in our warmer future.—Erin RubinShare52Tweet5Share30Email87 Shareslast_img read more

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