爱上海,上海龙凤419,上海419论坛 – Powered by Coral Miller!

Memorial Mass commemorates life of junior Theresa Sagartz

Posted on by

first_imgCaitlyn Jordan Students and other members of the Notre Dame community attended Mass at the Basilica of the Sacred Heart on Wednesday night in memory of junior Theresa Sagartz who died last week.“As we situate Theresa’s death into the fabric of our day-to-day lives, we are invited to look back, not with sadness or regret, but with gratitude, to be thankful for the way she touched our hearts, both directly and indirectly [in] her love of her family and friends, the resilience with which she lived her life,” McCormick said.“Through Jesus’ life, death and resurrection, he demonstrated how far he would go to prove God’s love and lasting commitment to each of us. Jesus’ testimony and God’s desire to be in relationship with us now serves as the basis for our prayer tonight, to commend a sister, a daughter, a friend, a role model, back to God.”McCormick said Sagartz was a woman who lived selflessly and was known for both her compassion and leadership — evident in her multiple roles on campus, which included being an “honorary mom” to section 2A in Zahm House who brought oranges to soccer games.“The list could go on forever of the things that made Theresa, Theresa,” McCormick said. “But what we celebrate is her turning back to God, a God who so deeply loves each of us that he has created a space for us in him to return. Theresa’s life has changed. It has not ended.”Sagartz’s life was a manifestation of God’s grace, McCormick said.“God blessed Theresa with the precise amount of time needed for her to make an impact on this world. We no doubt would have preferred more of it, yet so goes the delicate and precious nature of life. And while we are tempted to measure the quality of life in years, the true measure of life is what you do in the time that you have,” McCormick said. “If a person with 75 years mostly wraps himself in anger and greed, what good is that? Is it somehow better than 21 years filled with love and service to others? … No matter the time we have here, five minutes or 100 years, we are invited to look forward, mirroring God’s love that extends beyond us and extends beyond death.”The fullness of Sagartz’s life can serve as inspiration, McCormick said.“Leaving the Basilica tonight, my sincere hope is that each of us might be changed in some way,” he said. “Perhaps we may express a deeper gratitude for the family, friends and those lives that we come in contact with on a daily basis. … Or maybe, we develop a deeper trust through Jesus’ life, death and resurrection — that we do not mourn Theresa’s death as if it were the end, but rather, prayerfully, as she begins her journey to eternal life.”Senior News Writer Catherine Owers contributed to this report.Tags: memorial, memorial mass, Student death, Theresa Sagartz Family, friends and members of the Notre Dame community filled the Basilica of the Sacred Heart Wednesday evening to honor the life of Theresa Sagartz, a junior and former resident of Pangborn Hall, who died last week in her off-campus apartment due to apparent natural causes related to a medical condition.University President Fr. John Jenkins celebrated the memorial Mass, and Fr. Pete McCormick, director of Campus Ministry, delivered the homily. The Notre Dame Liturgical Choir provided music for the Mass.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

OpEd: Dean Martin’s Christmas Classics Reign Supreme

Posted on by

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Make way, Mariah Carey. Hit the road, Jose Feliciano. Bye-bye, Bing Crosby.Christmas is Dean Martin’s domain.Yes, winter is coming. But it need not be a season of unremitting gloom and doom. Let’s put aside our political differences and pandemic fears — at least for one day — and celebrate a festive Yuletide Saturnalia with Dean Martin, the King of Cool.And Long Island, which boasts a bevy of Dean Martin impressionists, is wall-to-wall Dino country.As Christmas crooners go, Dino Paul Crocetti evokes the warmth of a hearth fire on a snowy winter’s morn. Listening to his mellifluous Italianate baritone has long been a Christmas tradition in households around the world. From “Let It Snow” to “Marshmallow World” to “Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer,” Dean’s wintry melodies embody both the mirth and the majesty of the holiday season.Social distancing has made it difficult for families to congregate this year, but Dino’s rendition of “I’ll Be Home For Christmas,” will warm the cockles of even the most Scrooge-like relative’s heart. Not to mention Dean’s “Silver Bells.” And his melancholy “Blue Christmas” puts the Elvis Presley platter to shame.Throughout his fabled career, Dean Martin was no stranger to outperforming other musical stars. In 1964, he topped the Beatles’ “Heart Days Night” on the music charts with his smash single, “Everybody Loves Somebody Sometime.”In 1977, Dino sang a heartfelt “White Christmas” on his Christmas in California TV special. Afterward, Greg Garrison, Dean’s longtime producer-director, received a telephone call from Irving Berlin, who’d penned the iconic song long ago: “Mr. Garrison, I just want to tell you I just love your (show’s) star, and I want you to know that the White Christmas Dean did on the air was the best version I have ever heard.”So there, Der Bingle!And Dean Martin’s “Silent Night” is a reverential ode to the season’s spirituality.On the cheeky side of Christmas, Dino warbles “Baby It’s Cold Outside,” a saucy take on a snowbound couple’s duet of flirtation and love. Politically correct pundits who rail against this holiday classic are nothing more than modern-day Ebenezers.Manning a one-horse open sleigh, the Dean of Christmas takes us for a frolicsome trek through a winter wonderland in his jaunty version of “Jingle Bells.”At the 75th anniversary celebration of the NBC television network, comedian Bob Newhart poignantly praised Dean as “the most talented man” he’d ever known. Along with his films, which throughout the 1960s were never out of the top ten at the box office, Dean Martin hosted a TV variety show for nearly a decade — making him an American icon.During Apollo 7’s mission in space, Commander Wally Schirra echoed Dean Martin’s bon- homie by holding aloft a sign for all of Earth to see: “Keep those cards and letters coming in, folks.”(It was Dino’s tag line, which he invoked at the end of his hourly variety show every Thursday night.)In truth, Dean Martin was a multi-threat entertainer whose image as a boozing bon vivant belied an artist of considerable range and diversity. Whether starring with John Wayne or Montgomery Clift in classic Hollywood films, recording smooth romantic ballads, or hosting one of television’s greatest programs, Dino Paul Crocetti achieved international stardom by holding true to his inner creative voice.When Howard Hawks needed a highly emotive actor to play the drunken deputy to Duke Wayne’s stolid sheriff in “Rio Bravo,” the last person he envisioned was the singing straight man of a disbanded comedy team. Yet Dino’s nuanced Oscar-caliber performance as the fallen lawman who reclaims his honor — and the respect of his peers — wowed the veteran director.Vincente Minelli, Billy Wilder and George Seaton also found Dean Martin to be a conscientious thespian whose cinematic appeal was equaled by a strong commitment to his craft.Though not a practitioner of the Stanislavski “Method,” Dean brought an uncommon emotional intensity to his roles. This is especially evident in such dramatic films as “Rio Bravo,” “The Young Lions,” “Some Came Running,” “Ada” and “Career.”Dino also delivers a powerful performance in the film adaptation of Lillian Hellman’s play, “Toys in the Attic.”Martin is superb as Captain Vernon Demarest, a debonair, nerves-of-steel airline pilot who must contend with a morose bomber aboard a flight to Rome in “Airport.” This film is as suspenseful today as it was in the movie theaters half a century ago.And in “Mr. Ricco,” his last starring movie role, Dean Martin plays a principled defense attorney who champions civil liberties and upholds the rule of law while solving a bizarre murder mystery.After a cozy Yuletide dinner — serenaded by Dino’s dulcet holiday tunes — kick back and relax with a classic Dean Martin film. Though he passed away on Christmas Day twenty-five years ago, Dean Martin remains evergreen in our hearts.Sign up for Long Island Press’ email newsletters here. Sign up for home delivery of Long Island Press here. Sign up for discounts by becoming a Long Island Press community partner here.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Jiwasraya victims tour financial authorities’ offices demanding restitution

Posted on by

first_imgIda was among around 50 people – some of whom lost billions of rupiah per person – that demonstrated inside the Finance Ministry building demanding their money back, indicating fresh efforts from victims to get a resolution to the insurance scandal.Read also: Jiwasraya in talks with foreign, domestic investors over selling Jiwasraya PutraThey continued to the Financial Services Authority (OJK) office in front of the ministry’s main building in Central Jakarta and were still meeting with the agency’s officials at the time of writing.Jiwasraya met with trouble when it was unable to pay holders of policies worth about Rp 16 trillion that fell due in December, prompting the Attorney General’s Office (AGO) to launch a corruption investigation. At the Finance Ministry, protesters demanded to speak directly to Finance Minister Sri Mulyani, Deputy Finance Minister Suahasil Nazara or the ministry’s director generals as they delivered an official letter to the minister.Finance Ministry program and administration head Darmawan said that it would forward the letter to the officials but said that neither the minister nor her deputy were available to meet the group.“Sorry sir,” he said to one of the protesters. “If you will allow me, we will make sure to convey the message.”Both parties agreed to meet again at Darmawan’s arrangement and continued to march to the OJK office. Topics :center_img Ida Tumota, 60, had only one goal when she walked in the Finance Ministry on Thursday: to get her money back.The single mother had lost about Rp 500 million (US$36,500) of money she had invested in the state-owned insurer Asuransi Jiwasraya for her pension fund and her children’s education.“The government has defrauded me. I feel abused — through my time, efforts, money and my future that I have invested,” Ida said in a quivering voice.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Woman who says she was ‘sucker punched’ by Syracuse lacrosse player argues he deserves harsher punishment

Posted on by

first_imgThe woman who was punched in the face by a Syracuse lacrosse player last weekend said he should’ve been punished more harshly and deserves to face the consequences of his actions.Kendall Talbot, 20, of Brewerton, New York, said in an interview with The Daily Orange that she didn’t know SU midfielder Hayes McGinley until he “sucker punched” her in the face, breaking her cigarette in half and causing her tooth to pierce her lip. The incident followed a heated argument outside Insomnia Cookies on Marshall Street, where she was working on the night of March 14.“It’s the consequences of your actions,” she said during an interview at her house on Monday. “If you want to be on the team you can’t be like ‘Oh, I’m going to go out and get sh*tfaced tonight and expect nothing bad’s going to happen.’ Because you’re not you when you’re sh*tfaced.”Syracuse Athletics announced on Sunday that McGinley was suspended from the lacrosse team indefinitely due to an unspecified violation of team rules. He was suspended from the team on March 15, one day after he was charged with two counts of harassment in the second degree in connection with the incident involving Talbot.Talbot said she thought McGinley should have been charged with assault instead of harassment, and that police could have added a drunk and disorderly charge as well. She added that portions of the police report misrepresented what happened and that McGinley already “looked like sh*t” and had claw marks on his throat when she first saw him.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textHarassment in the second degree is punishable by a maximum $250 fine and/or a maximum of 15 days in jail. McGinley was arraigned in Syracuse City Court on March 15 and is due back in court on April 14.Talbot’s co-worker, William Weaver, 29, of Syracuse, was also involved in the incident and pressed charges against McGinley. Weaver could not be reached for comment on Monday.Talbot was working inside Insomnia Cookies when she noticed Weaver and another man, who she later found out was McGinley, standing near her car. She went outside to ask them to move away from the brand new car she had purchased five days earlier.When she went outside, she saw McGinley, who was pulling on the handle, trying to get in the car because he insisted that it was his ride.McGinley had already been arguing with Weaver and had punched him by the time she got outside, Talbot said. When she came out, the argument escalated with Talbot telling McGinley that he needed to “get the f*ck away from my car right f*cking now.”McGinley grabbed her chest, she said — though Talbot noted that she didn’t think he meant anything sexual by it. And she hit him back. The two continued to argue for about 30 minutes before it died down. Stressed out, she lit a cigarette as he was walking away. Then she was blindsided by his punch, which caused the cigarette to break in half, she said.“I understand like, I hit you first, but if you had punched me right after I hit you and not half an hour after I hit you, fair game,” Talbot said. “But you’re gonna sucker punch me like half an hour after, after we’ve been talking?“… I wasn’t even looking. It was a straight sucker punch.”Talbot went to the hospital after the police left at the insistence of her co-workers. She didn’t need stitches and a week later, she said the cut has healed. But the incident put her in a bad mood and she chain smoked for about two hours afterward and let her co-workers run the store.Talbot said she played sports in high school and believes that if you want to play on a team you have to abide by a code of conduct and can’t take risks like McGinley did.“I don’t want to ruin your life but you need to think, I don’t care who you are, if you’re going to make bad choices you’ve got to learn from them at some point,” Talbot said. ”That’s how you’re going to better yourself and if you’ve got to learn the hard way that’s not my fault.” Comments Published on March 23, 2015 at 2:54 pm Related Stories Syracuse midfielder Hayes McGinley suspended indefinitely after punching 2 people, arrestHayes McGinley’s lawyer said suspended SU midfielder had ‘no recognition’ of his actions that led to arrestcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Gov. Whitmer announces $65 million in CARES Act Funding for Michigan schools

Posted on by

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThis Funding will target districts most significantly impacted by COVID-19 LANSING, Mich. — Today, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced that she will allocate nearly $65 million in federal Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act dollars to Michigan school districts, higher education institutions, and other education-related entities that have been most significantly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. This includes schools in Michigan’s economically disadvantaged districts, and will help address the digital divide that has served as a barrier to remote learning for students and educators across the state.  The funding comes from the Governor’s Education Emergency Relief Fund.   “As we continue to navigate the COVID-19 pandemic and approach the start of the new school year, we must continue doing everything we can to protect our students, educators, and support staff. This funding will help us do just that, and ensure crucial support for our schools, whether it’s helping schools access PPE and cleaning supplies or helping students mitigate the impacts of learning loss in districts that need it most,” said Governor Whitmer. “This is a good start, but we still need the federal government to work together on a bipartisan recovery package to support all Michigan students and educators, as well as state governments, families, and small businesses.” The COVID-19 pandemic has had an unprecedented impact on Michigan’s students, educators, and support staff, especially those in low-income communities. GEER funds are meant for districts that are determined to be most significantly impacted by COVID-19. To ensure these districts are targeted, the framework distributes $60 million to school districts based on the number of students in high-need student groups. Districts will receive funding based on their numbers of economically disadvantaged students, special education students, and English language learners. To be eligible for funding, the school district’s concentration of economically disadvantaged pupils, compared to total district enrollment, must exceed 50%. Recipient districts will be required to use GEER funds for any of the following goals: Connectivity: Devices, internet access, access to remote services, or other similar purposes. Student Mental Health: Funding would enhance access to remote and in-person student mental health services. Addressing Learning Loss: Funding could be used by districts to offer supplementary content and intervention services to mitigate the impacts of learning loss. Out-of-School-Time Learning: Funds could be used to support out-of-school-time learning. These expenditures would ensure students have safe spaces to participate in remote education. Remote Learning Materials and Training (digital and non-digital): Funds could address both digital and non-digital content where remote learning continues as an instructional delivery model.  Teacher Training and Curriculum: Funding could be used to provide additional professional development and curriculum modifications that allow districts to effectively facilitate distance learning while expanding their knowledge of the science of teaching.  Other health, safety, and wellness needs identified, required, or recommended in the MI Return to School Roadmap. $5.4 million will be distributed to other education related entities, and will be distributed for statewide mental health services, public television learning resources, implementation of teacher professional learning practices, and the Early On program to help reach more infants and toddlers through remote early intervention. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Lt. Governor Garlin Gilchrist speaks about Biden-HarrisNext Exchange students beautify ACC’s campuslast_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .