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Archives for: June 23, 2021

Rugby Book Review – The Rugby Coaching Manual

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first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Do you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipcOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. The England front row of (L to R) Gareth Chilcott, Brian Moore and Paul Rendall scrum down during a match in 1988Even good coaching books can be heavy going for the reader, so how refreshing to discover something packed with sound advice yet as easy to digest as a forkful of rice. Keith Richardson, the former club and national coach who edited the RFU’s Technical Journal from 2001-08, writes as if he were talking to the Gloucester forwards he famously coached.Thus, although the familiar strands to good coaching are all here – such as do the simple things well, and don’t be afraid to abandon a move if things aren’t exactly right – it’s the details that make this such an enlightening read.Richardson doesn’t mind going against convention: he advocates a tackled player adopting a frontward body position when recycling ruck ball, and says let your fly-half throw in at the lineout – if he’s the best player at the job. He’s excellent on breakdown and set-piece technique, devising a solution to the age-old scrum problem of how to allow locks to get their heads in without loosening the front row’s bind, and even pointing out the absurdity of choosing a two-syllable word (en-gage) to start the scrum when the obvious word is ‘hit’. “If your pack waits for the full word from the ref, they’ll never get the vital inches of advantage at the first impact,” he says.Pitched at coaches just below pro level, the book also contains illustrations to show correct technique, useful drills and tips on how to manage a training session – one of which is remember to practise passing both ways, a trap many coaches fall into.Now retired, Richardson is a Kingsholm regular and plans to publish some analytical pieces on his former club.RW RATING 4/5 BUY IT AT:  thercm.org RRP:  £18.99  PUBLISHED BY:  Keith RichardsonGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the October 2010 issue of Rugby World Magazine TAGS: Book Review last_img read more

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Ross heads list of senior players to pledge futures to Welsh

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first_imgWelsh are also delighted to confirm that Players’ Player of the Year Hudson Tonga’uiha, who scored seven tries in 27 appearances in his debut season, has also re-signed. Others to commit to the Exiles include flanker Michael Hills, who scored three tries during the Championship play-offs, and centre Simon Whatling, both of whom return to Old Deer Park for a third season.Welsh will also once again be able to call on the services of former Wasps second row Martin Purdy, Tonga hooker Vili Ma’asi, Ex-Saracens number eight Ben Russell and prolific wing Liam Gibson. Gordon Ross the former Scottish internationalGordon Ross is among a number of experienced London Welsh players to commit to the Exiles for next season.The 33-year-old former Scotland international fly half has proved an inspired signing in his two seasons at the Dragons, and this season helped the club reach the Championship semi-finals for a second consecutive year.“I had a couple of opportunities to move elsewhere but I’ve really enjoyed my time at Welsh,” said Ross. “The squad is certainly improving and the club is heading in the right direction, and if the nucleus of the squad can stay together then hopefully we can build on what we’ve achieved so far.”Ross has made 49 appearances for the Exiles in all competitions since joining the club in 2009, scoring 242 points, but he is just one of several key and experienced players to commit to Welsh.Former England wing Paul Sampson and second row Matt Corker passed 100 league appearances for the Exiles last season, and the pair will both get the chance to add to their appearance tallies next season having agreed new deals with the club. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS CHICAGO – JUNE 21: Gordon Ross #10 of Scotland A looks to pass the ball against the England Saxons during the Cup Final of the Barclays Churchill Cup at Toyota Park on June 21, 2008 in Chicago, Illinois. England won 36-19. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images) Further re-signings to be announced in due course.In addition to Josh Drauniniu, Errie Claassens (both Worcester), Nick Runciman (Gloucester) and Aled Thomas (Scarlets), other players leaving London Welsh this summer include Dominic Shabbo, Waisea Luveniyali and Michael Holford. The club would like to thank all of these players for their efforts and wish them all the best for the future.last_img read more

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How to make it as a sports journalist: Peter Jackson

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first_img The Forward Pass Podcast – Peter JacksonWelcome to The Forward Pass, a series of conversations with leading rugby union journalists, broadcasters, presenters and photographers who will offer the next generation of media professionals – and fans – an insight into how they cover the sport.Veteran journalist Peter Jackson has been writing about sport for over 50 years with the vast majority of that time spent at Daily Mail’s rugby union correspondent. He ‘retired’ from that role in 2009 but continues to break news and offer views for The Rugby Paper and recently embraced TV fame as a straight-talking and crowd-pleasing guest on BBC Wales’ Scrum V magazine show.A noted author and respected member of the sports media, he joined Graham Jenkins to reflect on his journalism journey, what he has learnt along the way, the colourful characters he has met and how the game has developed over the years.What came first, a passion for rugby or writing?“It was the passion for writing. I was blessed in that I always had a clear idea of what I wanted to do in life. From the age of 11 or 12 I wanted to be a sports journalist, I mean I grew up in the 50s when newspapers were king, local radio hadn’t been thought of and if you talked about anything like mobile phones you would have been taken away by men in white coats and locked up!“It was very much a newspaper dominated age, you followed all the major sports event through the eyes of the great sports reporters of the time, I remember, I was lucky enough to win a prize at school and we could pick a book and I chose ‘More Ringside Seats’ by Peter Wilson, who was on The Daily Mirror, and I think the Mirror at the time were the highest selling newspaper in Europe with something close on six million.“Rugby then, was not cool, in Northern Ireland it was seen as a bit of a class game, pursued by the kids who went to the poshest schools, and I don’t think that was inaccurate, and the only time I think the working man talked about the Ireland rugby team was if they played what was then a Five Nations game and there might have been a cursory ‘oh I see we lost to England’ or whatever.“It never grabbed the imagination and it was only when I went to Cardiff and changed jobs that my whole life changed and I couldn’t believe it that bus conductors were talking about football, and by football they meant rugby, and all the little grounds in the South Wales, the Cross Keys, Newbridge, all these had floodlights and it was there that I felt the passion for the game and in many ways I wish I had felt that when I was back home growing up in Northern Ireland.”Is it true you came across a certain Mike Gibson in your school boy playing days?“I didn’t know anyone called Gibson but there was a guy in my class who knew all the rugby players at all the schools, I asked him, ‘Who’s this Gibson?’ and he said, ‘Oh, that’s Mike Gibson, he’s the biggest thing since sliced bread. You’re not playing Saturday are you? What have you don’t to deserve that?!’“Of course, Gibson then became what the late John Reason described as ‘pound for pound, the greater three-quarter the British Isles have produced in the last 50 years of the amateur era’. Yes, that was my misfortune. To say I suffered by comparison would be to put it mildly, but it does reinforce my view that if you’re going to make a living out of sport it is going to be writing about it, not playing it.”The incomparable Mike Gibson was admired by Jackson as a young manYou opted to pursue a career as a rugby writer rather than football?“The reason for that was that I enjoyed rugby more. Rugby to me then was full of colourful characters which is something I regret about the game today, in that is has become so much like football. You leave school, join an academy, you become pretty one-dimensional.“I go back to the great days of the 70s with Wales you had steel workers and miners rubbing shoulders with doctors and lawyers. They were all interesting people and quite willing to speak their mind on things. The game was just that, a game, it was not their livelihood although some of them felt it ought to have been. I miss those blokes.“I was even more blessed when I did become the chief rugby correspondent as that coincided with the period leading up to professionalism, all kinds of things were going on in the game…we all knew that for some time players, particularly in France and South Africa were being paid and amateur rugby union was a sham.”You spent 35 years at the Daily Mail, did you enjoy being part of the rugby press pack during that time?“Wonderful. I couldn’t have wished for better colleagues to work with or against, because we were competing. We did that in a way without falling out, inevitably there were bust ups but they didn’t last very long, we accepted we were all trying to scoop each other.“On tour there tended to be a more communal effort, nobody wanted to be woken up in Dunedin by an irate news desk saying, ‘Why haven’t we got this story they’ve got in The Telegraph?’ or ‘What about this piece in The Times?’”Do you have any tours or matches that you remember more fondly than others?“Yes, unquestionably the 1997 Lions tour to South Africa. If only every tour could have been like the 1997 Lions Tour. Why? Because it still had the best of the amateur ethos mingled in with early professionalism, everyone was made welcome and it hadn’t been made into the circus it is now. There were not people at every turn saying ‘you can’t speak to him’ or ‘you can’t ask him that’.“Fran Cotton was the manager and in every sense he is a gigantic figure of the game, not just in England, but he was free and easy, understood we had a job to do and Ian McGeechan, the coach, likewise, he was always very accommodating…The matches were wonderful, everywhere we went you were aware it was a big event, people were hugely interested and for me it will always be the stand out tour.”Joyful tour: The 1997 Lions tour of South Africa was a favourite of Jackson’sThe 1995 Rugby World Cup final in particular must stick in the memory?“That was staggering. They did tell us there was going to be a surprise and I can remember the stands at Ellis Park began to vibrate, we heard this almighty roar, then we saw the 747 and at first glance it seemed to have just climbed above the stands by about 20ft! I’m sure that wasn’t the case but that was the optical illusion.“I think, of all the events I was at, in terms of global dimension, that was THE final…Nelson Mandela dancing in his Springbok jersey with Francois Pienaar, it changed South Africa. A man who had been incarcerated for 27 years comes out without a trace of bitterness in his bones and sets about leading this country – it was absolutely amazing.”Were there any coaches or players you made a bee-line for knowing that they would be good copy? Industry veteran: Peter Jackson awards Stephen Jones with his Rugby Journalist of the Year award + Prepare – “Always come briefed, always know as much as you can about the person you are interviewing so you impress them with your knowledge of them. Don’t ever say to a player, ‘how many times did you play for England?’ as that will invite the answer, ‘Well you should know that!’”+ Be lucky – “When I left school, I joined the Belfast Telegraph in my home town as a news reporter. I didn’t have a clue as to how to write a news story but there were a lot of good people there, John Dinsmore was the news editor and John Wallace was the chief reporter, I could not have wished to have learnt from better or more qualified and patient people.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img A hugely respected rugby writer who has spanned six decades as a writer, Peter Jackson talks us through his life in rugby Ring me anytime: Barry John (far left) was always accommodating to journalists“Yes, all those Welsh players were always available. Barry John, the prototype rugby superstar, he would say ‘ring me anytime you want, it’s not a problem’ and it never was with him.“I wish I could say I got on with certain English fellas as well as I got on with those guys. Will Carling, I have great admiration for him as a player, when the chips were down boy did he stand up.“Will go a lot of criticism about the Lions in New Zealand in 1993 but when the Lions hit rock bottom at Hamilton when a Waikato team featuring John Mitchell and Warren Gatland beat the Lions 38-6, Carling I can still see manning the barricades when others weren’t bothered.”You hit the headlines yourself with your comments on BBC Wales’ Scrum V show a few months ago?“I could not believe how bad Wales were in the first game of the November series against Australia. I racked my brain because you don’t want to over react. Had I seen anything as bad as this from Wales in Cardiff? And the answer was no.“The trouble is, you will know, in journalism if you express your views then you are liable to upset people and they don’t speak to you and it’s a case of ‘that’s the end of the cooperation I’m going to give him’ and if that’s the price for my views then so be it.“It was nice to know that the fans generally tuned in with what I had to say although there was one tweet that made me smile, ‘more rubbish from the lamentable Peter Jackson, how the Mail put up with him for so long I do not know!’ I’m probably more used to being criticised than praised anyway!”Bad day at the office: Jackson was highly critical of Wales’ performance against AustraliaCritics were common even before the dawn of social media?“Your job as the rugby union correspondent is to write about the team, you are writing for your readership, not for the players, because they are the people buying the paper. You are more than happy to give England, Wales or whoever the main team is the benefit of the doubt but that does not stop you, we are not cheerleaders, which is a mistake I think a lot people make that we are there to glory the team’s good points and ignore the bad points. That’s not how journalism works, especially not these days when everything is under such microscopic inspection.”Do you think the sport is in good shape today?“I think to say it has come a long way is an understatement. I remember Wasps at Repton Avenue, at Loftus Road, at Wycombe at the end of the bottleneck going into the industrial estate when 6,000 would be a good crowd. I look at them now, 28,000 against Leicester – staggering.  A wonderful story, from almost going out of business to being the Pied Piper of the West Midlands and perhaps filling the void that great amateur clubs like Coventry would have filled.“Who would have forecast that? I remember Syd Millar, someone who I have immense respect for, he was propping for Ireland when I saw my first international in 1959, and he said to me a long, long time ago, ‘Always remember one thing, the public will only come out in big numbers for international rugby, they will not support the club rugby to the same extent.’ Whether that was wishful thinking on Syd’s part and he didn’t want to see the club game grow too big, for whatever reason that is totally wrong.Growing the game: Jackson has been impressed with Wasps’ renaissance“That said, there are problems. I am concerned by the apparent ease at which players can be sent off simply trying to catch a high ball. Is it there fault if the opposing wing chooses to take a suicidal leap over the top of him? There’s a difference between that and deliberately tipping someone up when they are in the air.“Likewise with the head-high tackles. It’s all very well saying no tackling above the shoulder but players being players and coaches being coaches will say what you do here is go in very low so that you are so low if anyone is going to tackle you they are bound to hit you around the head. You hope referees will use their sense of feel for the game, it is tough for them, they have a split second to make up their minds, we can sit back and analyse it frame by frame and say he should have gone.“But the danger now is you go from one extreme to another. From the amateur era where there was all kinds of skulduggery to today where we may lose players to red cards unnecessarily. The danger then is you almost emasculate the game as a consequence.”Is there one particular change you would like to change?“Most definitely, and this is a kind of in-house thing which I’m sure rugby journalists all over Britain would agree with me on, there is far too much interference by press officers, we tend to call them, with good reason, ‘prevention officers’.“I would like to think that if I was a press officer at a club,  I would take the job on the understanding that they would listen to my advice about how to tackle difficult scenarios. I mean it’s a wonderful business to be in but I do wonder about the lack of access and how you can develop relationships…today there is a divide between the critic and the performer which I think is to the detriment of both. I think we would have a better understanding if we could go back to the old days and we all mingled together as one and if someone wanted to ball you out then they did so in front of all the players and then it was forgotten about.”Peter Jackson’s top tips:+ Enthusiasm – “When you are disappointed or get knocked back, bounce back up again! Don’t feel sorry for yourself, you’ll need to develop a fairly hard skin. You’ll think, ‘I could have done better than that, better than the bloke who’s done it’ then make sure that you’re available the next time the opportunity comes along. Keep persevering, don’t be put off easily.”+ Don’t be a cheerleader – “You are writing for your readership, not for the players, because they are the people buying the paper…we are not cheerleaders, which is a mistake I think a lot people make that we are there to glory the team’s good points and ignore the bad points. That’s not how journalism works.”+ Be a good listener – “My father always used to say, ‘Son, you learn nothing from the sound of your own voice’. Listen to people, even when the person you are interviewing is perhaps being a little slow, looking for the right words, don’t interrupt them, let them continue speaking because that’s the way you will get the best quotes, the most meaningful comments.”Under scrutiny: Brian O’Driscoll takes the questions of the press pack+ Make your questions count – “The art of a being an interviewer is a bit like being a good referee, you’re not seen. Just ask the short, simple questions. Of course there are times when you want a straight answer, either yes or no, but equally there are other times when someone is a little reticent about speaking, ask them a question that they can’t answer so simply. ”last_img read more

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Un anuncio de Bonnie Anderson, Presidente de la Cámara de…

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first_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID President of the House of Deputies Featured Events Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing Un anuncio de Bonnie Anderson, Presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Posted May 23, 2012 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET center_img Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET [Oficial de Asuntos Públicos] Bonnie Anderson presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados de la Iglesia Episcopal ha emitido la siguiente carta a los diputados y primeros suplentes.El siguiente es el texto de la carta:23 de mayo de 2012Estimados diputados y primeros suplentes:Me dirijo a ustedes por dos razones: para agradecerles su apoyo, amistad, oraciones, desafíos, brillantez y amor que me han inspirado y humillado durante estos 6 años, y segundo, para notificarles que no tengo intención de presentarme a las elecciones como Presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados para un nuevo mandato.La razón por la que no busco la re-elección es muy simple: quiero dedicar más tiempo a mi familia. Mi marido, Glen, está jubilado. Quiero estar más con él. Nuestro increíble hijo, Justin, vive con nosotros y nos recuerda cada día, con su propia existencia, que Dios obra milagros con generosidad. Quiero celebrar la vida de Justin estando con él todos los días. Quiero hacer pasteles con mis nietos y acudir a todos sus conciertos, partidos de fútbol y obras de teatro escolares. Quiero tener conversaciones pausadas por teléfono con mis hijas. Ustedes se dan cuenta.Mañana, ustedes recibirán información sobre el proceso de elección de un presidente y vicepresidente, cuando estemos en Indianápolis.Ha sido un gran honor el dirigir esta cámara, y estoy satisfecha de observar las muchas maneras cómo los diputados y suplentes sirven y dirigen la Iglesia de Dios, tanto cuando la Convención General está en sesión como cuando no lo está. Sus voces resuenan no sólo dentro de la gran representante diversidad de la Convención General, sino también en nuestras comunidades y en las comisiones durante el trienio, en las juntas parroquiales y en los roles de liderazgo que ustedes ejercen en nuestras congregaciones, diócesis y provincias. En mis 21 años en la Cámara, y mis dos períodos como presidente, se me ha recordado una y otra vez la sabiduría de nuestros antepasados cuando crearon un sistema de gobierno que hace honor a la sencilla verdad teológica de que el Espíritu Santo sopla donde quiere, y que para discernir los propósitos de Dios debemos escuchar las voces de todos los bautizados.Por favor, sepan que voy a servir a pleno rendimiento en la Cámara de los Diputados como Presidente hasta que el “martillo golpee” el 12 de julio en Indianápolis.Paz y bendiciones,Bonnie Anderson, D.D.Presidente: La Cámara de los DiputadosOmnipotente y eterno Dios, fuente de toda sabiduría y entendimiento, hazte presente con los que deliberan en la Convención General para la renovación y la misión de tu Iglesia. Enséñanos a que en todas las cosas busquemos primero tu honor y tu gloria. Guíanos para percibir lo que es justo, y concédenos el valor para buscarlo y la gracia para llevarlo a cabo, por medio de Jesucristo nuestro Señor. Amén.— El Libro de Oración Común– – – – –En inglés: http://bit.ly/JRsEOO Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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Canada: TRC report ‘comprehensive, far-reaching,’ says Hiltz

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first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Archbishop Fred Hiltz calls release of the TRC report a “historic day for Canada, a sacred day for most of us, an absolutely great day” for residential school survivors. Photo: Art Babych[Anglican Journal, Ottawa] Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, on June 2 commended the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) for issuing a final report that he described as “very comprehensive and far-reaching into the soul of the country with respect to what we need to do to bring about reconciliation [between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians] that is just so long overdue.”He called the release of the report a “historic day for Canada, a sacred day for most of us,” adding, “it [has to] be, for survivors of residential schools, an absolutely great day.”In an interview, Hiltz said he appreciated the direction and clarity of the 382-page report, and its 94 “Calls to Action” specifically aimed at holding to account Parliament, the federal, provincial and local governments, churches, civic institutions and all Canadians.These recommendations essentially say, “here are some initiatives that need to be in place, to which you need to commit yourselves and show concrete results,” he said. (See related story.)Some recommendations particularly resonated with him. “The idea for a Royal Proclamation is bang on,” said Hiltz. “I think the idea of a Covenant of Reconciliation is absolutely beautiful. The idea of a National Council for Reconciliation gives credence and authority to what the Commission has said that this is not an ending, it’s a beginning.”In its report, the TRC called on the federal government to jointly develop, with Aboriginal peoples, a Royal Proclamation of Reconciliation to be issued by the Crown. “The proclamation would build on the Royal Proclamation of 1763 and the Treaty of Niagara of 1764, and reaffirm the nation-to-nation relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown,” it said. The proclamation must repudiate “concepts used to justify European sovereignty over Indigenous lands and peoples,” said the TRC, including the Doctrine of Discovery, a principle of charters and acts developed by colonizing Western societies 500 years ago to expropriate Indigenous lands and territories.It also called on all parties to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement — the federal government, churches (including the Anglican Church of Canada), survivors and the Assembly of First Nations — to develop and sign a Covenant of Reconciliation. This covenant must reaffirm their commitment to reconciliation, repudiate the Doctrine of Discovery and support the renewal or establishment of Treaty relationships “based on principles of mutual recognition, mutual respect and shared responsibility for maintaining those relationships in the future.”The TRC also asked the Parliament of Canada, in consultation and collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to establish a National Council for Reconciliation that will monitor, evaluate and report annually on “post-apology progress on reconciliation to ensure that government accountability for reconciling the relationship between Aboriginal peoples and the Crown is maintained in the coming years,” said the TRC.Hiltz said he felt “very challenged” by some of the calls to action directed specifically at churches, but also felt “encouraged that some initiatives are already in place.” He cited the TRC’s call for the government and churches to formally adopt and comply with the principles, norms and standards of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples as a framework for reconciliation. “They want a statement by March 31, 2016 about what you’re going to do about that. I look at that and think, ‘we’ve got a lot of work to do,’ ” he said. “And then, I think, we [the church] have a [Primate’s Commission on the Doctrine of Discovery, Reconciliation and Healing] in place…”Conversations around the U.N. declaration and the Doctrine of Discovery have already started in the church, and the TRC’s recommendations “challenge us to be steadfast and be accountable, and I think that’s entirely in order,” he added.Hiltz also said he agreed with the TRC’s assessment that the residential schools constituted a form of cultural genocide. “That’s what it was. I agree with that. The policy of assimilation was to ‘kill the Indian in the child,’ and turn him or her into a citizen. That’s cultural genocide,” he said.Asked what his message was to Anglicans, Hiltz said, “My message is as simple as what I heard this morning: we need to turn apology and actions associated with that into priorities, and so I’m saying, we need to take the recommendations of the TRC, which apply to the churches, and declare them to be priorities in our church.”In its recommendations specific to churches that operated the federally funded schools (Anglican, United, Presbyterian and Roman Catholic), the TRC asked that education strategies be developed “to ensure that their respective congregations learn about their church’s role in colonization, the history and legacy of residential schools, and why apologies to former residential school students, their families and their communities were necessary.”The TRC also called on church signatories to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement as well as other faith groups to “formally recognize Indigenous spirituality as a valid form of worship that is equal to their own” in order to address the “spiritual violence” committed in the schools, the effects of which, reverberate to this day in Aboriginal communities.Churches must also establish permanent funding for Aboriginal “community-controlled” healing and reconciliation projects, education and relationship-building projects and regional dialogues for Indigenous spiritual leaders and youth to discuss Indigenous spirituality, self-determination and reconciliation, said the TRC.About 150,000 First Nations, Inuit and Métis children were removed from their homes and sent to residential schools as part of the government’s policy of cultural genocide, said the TRC. “The Canadian government pursued this policy of cultural genocide because it wished to divest itself of its legal and financial obligations to Aboriginal people and gain control over their land and resources,” it noted. “If every Aboriginal person had been ‘absorbed into the body politic,’ there would be no reserves, no Treaties and no Aboriginal rights.”Cultural genocide, explained the TRC, involves the destruction of political and social institutions of a group, the seizure of their land, the forcible transfer of populations and restriction of their movements, the banning of their language and spiritual practices, the persecution of spiritual leaders and the disruption of families to prevent the transfer of its cultural values and identity to succeeding generations. “In its dealings with Aboriginal people, Canada did all these things,” said the TRC. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Canada: TRC report ‘comprehensive, far-reaching,’ says Hiltz Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET By Marites N. SisonPosted Jun 3, 2015 Tags Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Anglican Communion Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CAlast_img read more

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UK government funds security at places of worship

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first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Anglican Communion News Service] The U.K. government have announced a £2.4 million ($3.1 million) fund to help secure places of worship in England and Wales.Churches, mosques and temples have been invited to bid for grants if they can show that they are at risk of attack from religious hate crimes. Synagogues are excluded from the program because the government has provided a separate grant to the Community Security Trust, a charity that provides protection services to Britain’s Jewish communities.The scheme was launched June 26 by Britain’s senior home affairs minister, Amber Rudd, as she outlined a Hate Crime Action Plan. This will include a study into how the different police forces in the country understand and respond to hate crimes; and a commitment from the government to “give young people and teachers the tools they need to tackle hatred and prejudice, including through a new program to equip teachers to facilitate conversations around international events and the impact they have on communities here in the UK.”The action plan was launched following a rise in racist incidents since the UK voted to withdraw from the European Union. This has led in particular to an increase in anti-Muslim and anti-Semitic incidents.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has frequently spoken out against the rise in racist incidents since the EU referendum. Earlier this month, at the Church of England’s General Synod in York, he said: “It is perfectly clear that the result and the referendum campaign had “exposed deep divisions in our society, of which we were aware already” and he called on the Church to “respond with a fresh effort in integration.”“The result [of the referendum] has released a latent racism and xenophobia in all sectors, and challenges the prevailing consensus of tolerance and acceptance, thus threatening other areas of welcome liberalization,” he said.Speaking at the launch of the Hate Crime Action Plan, Rudd said that “Those who practice hatred send out a message that it’s okay to abuse and attack others because of their nationality, ethnicity or religious background; that it’s okay to disregard our shared values and promote the intolerance that causes enormous harm to communities and individuals.“Well, I have a very clear message for them. We will not stand for it. Hatred has no place whatsoever in a 21st century Great Britain that works for everyone.“We are Great Britain because we are united by values such as democracy, free speech, mutual respect and opportunity for all. We are the sum of all our parts – a proud, diverse society. Hatred does not get a seat at the table, and we will do everything we can to stamp it out.”A government spokesperson added that its commitment to tackling hate crime was “underpinned by some of the strongest legislation in the world”, including “specific offenses for racially and religiously aggravated activity and offenses of stirring up hatred on the grounds of race, religion and sexual orientation.“The government has worked with the police to improve our collective response to hate crime including ensuring the recording of religious based hate crime now includes the faith of the victim, a measure which came into effect this year.” Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest UK government funds security at places of worship Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listing By Gavin DrakePosted Jul 26, 2016 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Anglican Communion Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

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Bishop riding bike 4,300 miles across Canada in fundraiser

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first_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Diocese of Qu’Appelle Bishop Rob Hardwick has reached Ottawa on his mammoth cycle journey across Canada to raise funds supporting indigenous ministries within the Anglican Church of Canada, and to promote healing and reconciliation. His journey, beginning in May in Victoria, British Colombia, will take him through the summer to St. John’s, Newfoundland, a distance of over 4,300 miles.Read the full article here. Posted Jul 19, 2018 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service Indigenous Ministries Anglican Communion, Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Bishop riding bike 4,300 miles across Canada in fundraiser Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA last_img read more

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Florida bishops send letter to governor calling for solution to…

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first_img Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis COVID-19, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Florida bishops send letter to governor calling for solution to state’s dysfunctional unemployment benefits system Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit an Event Listing [Diocese of Southeast Florida] With the United States losing a record 20.5 million jobs in April, having a reliable system for processing unemployment benefits has never been more important. Yet many Floridians report that their state’s system is not functioning and they don’t know when or if they will receive the payments they are entitled to. Florida’s Episcopal bishops issued the following letter to Gov. Ron DeSantis on May 5, urging his administration to solve the problems as quickly as possible.Dear Governor DeSantis,As Bishops of the Episcopal Church in Florida, who exercise both spiritual oversight of our respective communities and also a collective pastoral concern for all the people of our State who live in our dioceses, we are encouraged by the investigation that you ordered yesterday (May 4) into the current difficulties in our State’s unemployment benefits system. We share your judgement that the system is “broken,” and while we understand that there have been problems with the system that pre-date your administration, we urge you to give this matter the highest possible priority so that the State may fulfill its obligation of care for our unemployed sisters and brothers in our communities.According to a recent survey conducted by Florida Congresswoman Stephanie Murphy, access for unemployed workers to the State Unemployment Insurance Benefits, a state-federal program, varies from State to State depending entirely on how well the program is being administered. She went on to report that 93% of respondents have reported a very negative experience in the application process, while only 1% of applicants responded favorably. Applicants report website crashes, freezes, or failures to load properly after hours of unsuccessful attempts to complete the application process.One citizen, laid off in early March, noted that her problems with receiving any benefits or talking to a representative at the Department of Economic Opportunity were thwarted due to the unavailability of the callback feature. This is but one example of the unacceptable situation that is being repeated over and over and across our State, and about which we are hearing every day. We are also deeply concerned that communities of our black and brown fellow citizens are suffering at a disproportionately higher rate from this inaccessible unemployment benefits system.The current pandemic has brought these difficulties into high relief and has made their resolution all the more urgent. Both the foundational documents of our nation, as well as the social teachings of the Church, place the dignity and well-being of the human person at the heart of our common concern, and both the tradition of the Scriptures and the social teaching of the Church insist that the care for the neediest among us is a defining mark of an ethical society and a moral measure of any economy.The Church teaches that the State has an obligation to do all in its power to ensure the best possible environment for employment for all those who can, want, and need to work. The support of a stable and growing job market is of prime importance, but in an economic system in which there will always be unemployment and underemployment, the State also has a moral as well as a financial obligation to support those who may at any given point in their lives be out of work, or not have sufficient work to support the basic necessities of life. In addition, this support must be made readily and quickly available to the unemployed and underemployed, without undue hindrance or difficulty in circumstances where they are already under pressure.In the light of the obligations of the State in this matter, and consonant with the social teachings of the Church, it follows that a statewide system of unemployment insurance must be (a) easy to access; (b) efficient and responsive to changing needs; (c) inclusive of all people but prioritizing those in the greatest need; and (d) prudent in the extent and duration of allocated benefits. Such an unemployment insurance program promotes the common good, reflects the preferential option for the poor and those in need, protects the dignity of the human person, and secures the State’s function as a limited, yet principal and necessary, agent overseeing an economy that is to be ordered to the benefit of all people.As bishops and pastors, every day we see and know the cost of unemployment at the individual and local level, as well as the chronic problems that are caused by a system of inadequate benefits and impeded access. We are also acutely aware of the economic crisis that is a consequence of the current pandemic, as it is affecting our church communities as much as it is affecting our fellow citizens.While we recognize the challenges that the pandemic is presenting across the board, we do however remain firm in our conviction that the present system of access to unemployment benefits in our State is unjust, if not in its intention, then certainly in its consequences, and the swift and effective resolution of these problems must be a matter of expeditious action. The ability of our citizens and our communities to recover from the cost that the coronavirus pandemic has exacted from us all depends in large measure on the support of our unemployed and underemployed sisters and brothers until such time – may it be soon – that they can return to full employment. This is a matter of common, bi-partisan concern, and we look to you for clear and unequivocal leadership in this matter. We affirm our support as your administration addresses quickly and effectively the problems that exist and finds ways to deliver immediate aid to those who, for some weeks now, have been living without the means to support life and subsistence.Thank you for your public expression of care for our people, and especially for those underserved people who are our friends and neighbors. Let us outdo ourselves in this State in compassion and mercy.Yours sincerely,The Right Reverend Gregory Brewer Bishop of Central Florida (Orlando)The Right Reverend Peter Eaton Bishop of Southeast Florida (Miami)The Right Reverend Russell KendrickBishop of the Central Gulf Coast (Pensacola)The Right Reverend Dabney SmithBishop of Southwest Florida (St Petersburg) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Youth Minister Lorton, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Faith & Politics Submit a Job Listingcenter_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Tags Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY Posted May 8, 2020 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

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Anglican and Lutheran leaders in Canada call for government intervention…

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first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Posted Oct 28, 2020 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit a Press Release Environment & Climate Change, Indigenous Ministries Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Anglican and Lutheran leaders in Canada call for government intervention on Indigenous fishing rights Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tagscenter_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR [Anglican Church of Canada] The following letter was sent by the leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and other Canadian officials:As the safety and well-being of Mi’kmaw people is are threatened, their fundamental human rights—embodied in the Friendship Treaty of 1752, the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and the 1999 affirmation of their Treaty Rights in the Marshall Decision—are minimized, ignored, or denied. The denial of the full humanity of the Mi’kmaw people by those who refuse to recognize these treaty obligations is at the base of this hatred and violence. Anything that is less than an urgent response by those who share in the protection of these rights risks a complicity in a great evil.Read the entire letter here. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

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Sullivan staff holding Apopka office hours

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first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 TAGSJennifer Sullivan Previous articleGoodwill offering GED classes in ApopkaNext articleA full day of Back to School events in Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your comment! Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom center_img State Representative Jennifer Sullivan’s staff will hold office hours at Apopka City Hall on Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. for constituent outreach.  Please call Morgan Hatfield at 352-742-6275 for an appointment.If you need immediate assistance, please visit or contact our Eustis office located at 2755 South Bay Street, Unit D, Eustis 32726, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  You may also contact our office at 352-742-6275.or email: [email protected] you live north of 441 you are most likely in District 31 and Jennifer Sullivan is your State Representative in Tallahassee.Sullivan is in her second term in the Florida Legislature after decisive wins in 2014, and 2016. She is the Majority Deputy Whip. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Coming to Apopka City Hall in AugustJennifer Sullivan Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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