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12-year-old charged with murder in fatal Texas shooting of 10-year-old brother

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first_imgKTRK(HOUSTON) — A 10-year-old Texas boy was shot to death after his 12-year-old sibling allegedly got access to a gun and shot the child in the chest, authorities said on Sunday.The fatal shooting occurred on Saturday afternoon at a rural property in Conroe, about 50 miles south of Houston, according to the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.“Based on the investigation conducted by the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, a 12-year-old sibling has been charged with murder and is currently in custody in the Montgomery County Juvenile Detention Facility,” Lt. Scott Spencer of the sheriff’s office said in a statement on Sunday.The name of the juvenile charged in the case was not released; the boy who died wasn’t named, either.Spencer said police were called to a home in Conroe about 2:40 p.m. local time on Saturday and found the young victim suffering from a single bullet wound to the chest. He said the boy was taken to a local hospital, where he died.Sheriff’s officials declined to say where the juvenile homicide suspect obtained the weapon.The shooting marked at least the third time in seven months that a child 12 years old or younger has been investigated in a homicide in the United States.In January, a 12-year-old Texas boy was charged with capital murder in the fatal shooting death of a professional boxer.The victim, 24-year-old John VanMeter, was found in his Uvalde, Texas, home, west of San Antonio, shot in the head.VanMeter’s girlfriend found the man’s body and called 911 to report someone had broken into their home and shot VanMeter in the head, according to the Uvalde Police Department.In November, an 11-year-old boy shot and killed his grandmother and took his own life in their Arizona home after he was told to clean his room, authorities said.The violent incident occurred in Litchfield Park, Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix, and was witnessed by the child’s grandfather, whose gun was used in the tragedy, according to the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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House or ATM? Cash-out refinancings spiked in 2020

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first_img Email Address* Tags Mortgage rates fell below 3 percent for the first time last year, making refis a no-brainer for many homeowners. Last year, there were $2.4 trillion refinancings, according to mortgage data firm Black Knight.ADVERTISEMENTFor some homeowners, cash-out refis were a financial cushion in a financially tough year. Others withdrew equity to be able to buy bigger homes. Many took out cash for major home renovations, particularly given low inventory nationwide.“They can’t find a house to move into, so they’ve basically decided to make their homes work long-term,” said Eric Henning, a mortgage loan officer in Washington.Cash-out refis do have a downside: They reset the clock on 30-year mortgages, meaning owners could pay additional interest. There can also be tax implications.But economists don’t consider today’s cash-out refinancings as risky as in the run-up to the 2008 crisis: home prices are rising now, while values plummeted then.[WSJ] — E.B. SolomontContact E.B. Solomont Housing MarketMortgagestristate-weekly (iStock/Illustration by Kevin Rebong for The Real Deal)Americans treated their homes like ATMs last year, withdrawing $152.7 billion amid a cash-out refinancing spree not seen since before the 2008 financial crisis.Fueled by historically low interest rates, cash-out refinancings rose 42 percent year over year, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing data from Freddie Mac.Read moreCovid spurs refinancing spree Low rates give refinancings a boost Huge supply crunch pushes home prices up Full Name* Share via Shortlink Message* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlinklast_img read more

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Sri Lanka Navy Arrests 18 Fishermen for Illegal Fishing

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first_img View post tag: asia June 6, 2014 Back to overview,Home naval-today Sri Lanka Navy Arrests 18 Fishermen for Illegal Fishing View post tag: Fishermen View post tag: Navy View post tag: Illegal Sri Lanka Navy arrested 18 fishermen engaged in illegal fishing using prohibited fishing gears 04 NM East of Kukkuthuduwai, Mullativu on 4th June 2014. Authorities Naval troops attached to Naval Deployment Nayaru of the Eastern Naval Command arrested the fishermen and 4 FGDs engaged in these illegal activities.The arrested persons with items were handed over to the Assistant Director Fisheries in Mullativu for further investigations.[mappress]Press Release, June 06, 2014; Image: Sri Lanka Navy View post tag: 18 View post tag: fishing View post tag: News by topic Sri Lanka Navy Arrests 18 Fishermen for Illegal Fishing View post tag: Arrests View post tag: Sri Lanka Navy View post tag: Naval Share this articlelast_img read more

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The outsider: Andrew Hamilton

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first_imgOxford’s new Vice Chancellor, Andrew Hamilton, has outlined his position on a number of Oxford’s biggest challenges this week. He announced that he has an American-style vision of “tying alumni [to a] life-long relationship with Oxford,” which he insisted is “not about money.”Hamilton went on to talk to Cherwell about the future of University funding and the problems of his own image as an ‘outsider’ from America. He also discussed how he intends to tackle the University’s media image, its recent slip in an international poll of Universities and the lack of female academics in top University jobs.Hamilton stressed the importance of University life; one of his chief ‘imported’ aims is to help current freshers to continue to feel connected with their University into their old age. “The three or four years that you spend at Oxford are often the three or four years where you find the passion in your life,” he said. “Also in those three years you make life-long friends, you engage in the interests that become important in your life.” He commented, “The American Universities have done this very well.”While considering his vision to be part of a response to the funding problem, he argued, “People often think too quickly that it’s about money. It’s not about money; it’s about a life-long relationship with the University… The money comes later, the money becomes a natural deepening of the relationship that an alumnus or alumna who perhaps has been successful in their life feels the affinity with the University and wants to ensure that future generations have the same benefits and experiences that they had.”He defended his ‘outsider’ status, saying, “You say an outsider as if that represents something foreign and problematic; absolutely not. I think it gives me a perspective of many different aspects of education, research and University administration which I hope will give me an advantage.” He added, “I am the first Vice-Chancellor not to have an Oxford degree. It’s not an advantage or disadvantage – it’s who I am.”Since getting the job in June 2008, Hamilton has been trying to dispel the myth that he intends to Americanise the University. He pointed out, “the leading American Universities are, in fact, trying to become more like Oxford, they’re building colleges, they’re focusing on undergraduate education in an intense and excellence driven way in the way that Oxford does.” He admitted to being frustrated recently by the Guardian’s description of his trans-Atlantic twang and shiny white teeth. “I think they were wishing to portray me as an American. While I have spent many years in America I still retain and have retained close links with the country of my birth.” He made clear that his teeth were “the product of 1970s British dentistry.”In light of the recent ‘When Boris met Dave’ programme, he attacked the media’s often outdated depiction of Oxford. “The media has a perception that is much developed for their own purposes; that Oxford is an exclusive place with Sebastian and his teddy-bear on every street corner. That’s not the Oxford I’ve discovered; I’ve actually found a very modern, very vibrant, very diverse place that is firmly focused on the future.”Hamilton lauded student ambassadors and bloggers who set about “busting the Oxford myth,” but agreed the University, too, had a duty to do more to tackle an off-putting ‘exclusive’ image. “We need to work harder to project the real Oxford. We’ve got to counter the perception of Oxford by a blizzard of stories of our own on the real Oxford.”He was not worried by Oxford’s slipping in international league tables. “We should recognise that league tables are a very poor mechanism of judging the enormous complexity of a University and its many different dimensions. It’s very puzzling that here we have a University that only a few months ago achieved a remarkable performance in the research assessment exercise. It is odd to see that drop of one place. If one looks very hard at the details you will see that the only change that occurred from the previous year is a drop in the citations per paper.” Noting the drop had come in the very week of his taking up the job, he joked, “How careless of me!”The male-dominance of the University’s staff was more of a concern. “I think it’s an area we’ve got to pay very close attention to; it’s a process that begins at the very beginning of recruitment, we’ve to be sure that we’re searching aggressively far and wide for candidates of the very highest academic quality but who come from different backgrounds.”When pressed upon his position on student fees, he avoided committing himself to a side of the debate, “I’m not going to support or reject anything at the beginning of a debate – it’s too early for me to support or reject any part of that debate. I’m going to listen and consult… I want more information in front of me before I make any personal comments on the advantages or disadvantages of a particular strategy.”He was, however, adamant in his focus on upping bursaries and scholarships. “I feel very strongly an important part the university has to play is in ensuring that, as the debate about fees unfolds, the issue of bursaries unfolds at the same rate.”last_img read more

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St. Mary’s Hospital for Women & Children Birth Reports

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first_img Heather and Philip Hannah, Poseyville, Ind., Son, Miles Xavier, Mar. 13Nicole and Jason Yates, Jasper, Ind., Daughter, Paislee Aurora, Mar. 13Amanda and Matthew Keil, Haubstadt, Ind., Son, Sawyer John, Mar. 14Samantha Walton and Jonathan Ice, Mount Carmel, Ill., Son, Damian Scott, Mar. 14Megan Williams and De’Wayne Esters, Evansville, Son, Tyce Evieion, Mar. 14Maggie Turner and Beau Smith, Sturgis, Ky., Son, Brian Wesley, Mar. 14Shantel Ingram and Christopher Reed, Mount Carmel, Ill., Daughter, Kenlee Neveah, Mar. 14Taylor and Brandon Chase, Henderson, Ky., Son, Anderson Michael, Mar. 15Tierra and Michael Jackson, Mount Vernon, Ind., Daughter, Janika Jean, Mar. 16FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img

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OCHS Grad Amanda O’Connor Signs Contract; Dad Resumes Teaching

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first_imgBy Tim KellyIt has been a whirlwind year for Bill and Amanda O’Connor.When we last checked in, the dynamic father-daughter duo was celebrating Amanda’s June 2017 graduation from Ocean City High School and preparing for a return to their native New York City.Today Bill, 55, is back to his career roots as a teacher in the New York Public Schools. A former Dean of Students at a public school, he was hired last summer as a financial literacy teacher at Horace Greeley Intermediate School in Astoria, Queens.Nineteen-year-old Amanda went back to chase her dream of an acting and singing career. She took a major step last week, signing her first recording contract with Los Angeles-based Parliament Records. The deal includes representation by a manager and agent to find auditions for roles in feature films as well as help guide her music career.Who says you can’t go home again?The O’Connors’ triumphant return to New York is the latest chapter in their recovery process from unspeakable tragedy.  Bill’s wife and Amanda’s mom Diana J. Vega O’Connor was murdered along with 2,752 others in the 9/11 terror attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001 in lower Manhattan.Diana, the 15th of 16 children from a Brooklyn family and only the second in her family to graduate from college, was a Managing Director at Sandler O’Neill and Partners, an investment banking firm located on the 104th floor of the World Trade Center’s South Tower.  She was 37.Bill’s profound grief made him “a complete mess” in the first months after the tragedy, he said. But Amanda, who was just two years old at the time, gave him the courage to press on.“I’ve often said that Amanda is the main reason I’m still around,” Bill said. “No matter how much despair I felt, I knew that I had to be there for my daughter.”He quit his job to focus on becoming a fulltime father. “I knew that I did not want Amanda to be raised by a nanny or even another relative,” he said. But there were difficulties for both Bill, who was thrust into single fatherhood, and Amanda, who bounced around four schools in five years.“Everywhere we went in New York, we would see reminders” of that terrible day Bill said.  “People were so nice to us, but their kindnesses were reminders too.  We didn’t want our identities to be defined as a victim’s family. We had vacationed in Ocean City, and we both loved it.  It was Amanda’s idea to move to Ocean City permanently and start over.”OC was the perfect emotional haven, Bill said.  Close enough to New York to visit family and friends, far enough and different enough to provide a perfect atmosphere for healing. Father and daughter made new friends, rode bikes around town, and went to the beach and boardwalk.For his daughter, a tall and slender freshman in 2013 who’d inherited her mom’s physical beauty, assimilation as the new kid in town happened slowly but surely.  With a core group of new friends, Amanda found her comfort zone and made it as a Red Raider.The kids would hang out at the condo and Bill stayed up all night, driving them to the movies or Wawa, and ultimately back to their far-flung homes on the island or in sending district towns.  There were also more than a few unplanned sleepovers.“My Dad gave up his career to be there for me, but he was also there for my friends,” Amanda remembered.  When her friends weren’t around, she would write melodies and poetry and build the creative elements into songs.Bill and Amanda O’Connor at OCHS GraduationWhen Amanda picked up her OCHS diploma, the time was right for the pair’s return on their own terms.  Amanda had been accepted in the prestigious Lee Strasberg Theatre and Film Institute in Manhattan and immersed herself in the study of method acting.  Her music continued as a priority as well.Bill spent 15-hour days putting Horace Greeley School’s financial literacy program in place.  In September he returned to the classroom after a 15 year hiatus. The feedback he received from students, parents and administration was “awesome,” O’Connor said. But his biggest satisfaction came from watching the young people put the material to practical use.“We have 14-year-olds saving for retirement already,” he said, with a mixture of pride and laughter. “These kids are shopping for interest rates, shopping for credit cards, transferring debt from high interest cards to low interest cards.  They are financial samurais!”Amanda with writer and producer Gabriel Maciocia of Ocean City (right) and her dad Bill O’Connor.Not to be outdone, one of Amanda’s songs, “Don’t Cry for Me,” caught the attention of her old Ocean City neighbor, Gabriel Maciocia, an artist, producer and songwriter whose resume includes working with 60s musical icons the Four Tops and Tommy James.“Her voice is soulful and different, and I believe marketable,” said Maciocia, 69. He encouraged Amanda to go into the studio and record an audition CD.“Gabe believed in my music,” Amanda said.  “To be encouraged by such a professional really helped my confidence.”Amanda also credited Maciocia’s girlfriend Rita Boyle as one of her top cheerleaders.  “She always told me that if you work hard and persevere you can accomplish anything.”For the audition, Amanda recorded her vocals and piano and Maciocia mixed in more instrumentation and tweaked the arrangement. The result was a “radio version” of the song, which Maciocia shipped off to Parliament records.Approximately one week later, the call came from a Parliament executive, along with the contract offer. After discussing it with Bill, Amanda signed the three-year deal for an undisclosed sum.“It all happened so fast, it was crazy,” she said, “and now the real work begins.”Amanda has about nine more songs ready to record for the first album.  Her music combines the styles of pop and R&B, and her lyrics are topical.“I want my songs to reach people at a musical level but also have meaning for them to relate to,” Amanda said. She has addressed topics such as suicide, addiction and relationships in her music. Other songs are more upbeat feel-good tunes.“As talented a singer she is, she is every bit as great of a lyricist,” said Gabe.  “I have been around a long time and she’s as good as I’ve seen. She also handles herself really well with adults.  Amanda comes across like a 35-year-old who is actually 19.”“To think it all began with me experimenting on the piano in my bedroom, writing songs,” she said. “Now I have a chance for a lot of people to hear them.”Amanda credits her Mom for having the foresight to buy her a grand piano at the age of one.“(Diana) is a big part of all of this,” Amanda said.  She must have seen something in me to get a grand piano for me at that age.”“I think Mom would be really proud me and my Dad today.” Amanda works on a song for her upcoming album with Parliament Records.last_img read more

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Speech: PM’s statement at Downing Street: 16 January 2019

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first_imgThis evening the Government has won the confidence of Parliament.This now gives us all the opportunity to focus on finding a way forward on Brexit.I understand that to people getting on with their lives, away from Westminster, the events of the past 24 hours will have been unsettling.Overwhelmingly, the British people want us to get on with delivering Brexit, and also address the other important issues they care about.But the deal which I have worked to agree with the European Union was rejected by MPs, and by a large margin.I believe it is my duty to deliver on the British people’s instruction to leave the European Union. And I intend to do so.So now MPs have made clear what they don’t want, we must all work constructively together to set out what Parliament does want.That’s why I am inviting MPs from all parties to come together to find a way forward.One that both delivers on the referendum and can command the support of Parliament.This is now the time to put self-interest aside.I have just held constructive meetings with the leader of the Liberal Democrats, and the Westminster leaders of the SNP and Plaid Cymru.From tomorrow, meetings will be taking place between senior Government representatives, including myself, and groups of MPs who represent the widest possible range of views from across Parliament – including our confidence and supply partners the Democratic Unionist Party.[Political content removed]It will not be an easy task, but MPs know they have a duty to act in the national interest, reach a consensus and get this done.In a historic vote in 2016 the country decided to leave the EU.In 2017 80% of people voted for Parties that stood on manifestos promising to respect that result.Now, over two and a half years later, it’s time for us to come together, put the national interest first – and deliver on the referendum.last_img read more

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Transparency data: DHSC Government Major Projects Portfolio data, 2020

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first_imgEach government department has published detailed information about projects on the Government Major Projects Portfolio (GMPP). This includes a Delivery Confidence Assessment rating, financial information (whole life cost, annual budget and forecast spend), project schedule and project narrative.The data reflects the status of the GMPP at 30 September 2019 and supports the 2020 Infrastructure and Projects Authority (IPA) Annual Report.last_img

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I work for everybody back home’

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first_imgEditor’s Note: This is the second story in a series featuring Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s graduates serving as members of Congress. This series, titled “Trading Golden Dome for Capitol Dome,” will run on Fridays.  Election Day 2012 marked the election of Sen. Joe Donnelly, the first Democrat to win an Indiana statewide race in more than a decade, and the end of one of the most contentious Senate races in Indiana history.  After State Treasurer Richard Mourdock beat out six-term senator Richard Lugar in the Republican primary, Mourdock faced then-Representative Donnelly in the general election. The contest culminated in a debate at New Albany, Ind., at Indiana-University Southeast, where a comment he made about abortion and rape gained national attention.  Donnelly, a “Double Domer” who graduated from Notre Dame with a B.A. in 1977 and with a J.D. in 1981, said his faith in the people of Indiana and his Notre Dame education helped him to focus on the path to the Senate, despite partisan conflict. “It’s not usually the easiest path as a Democrat in Indiana,” Donnelly said. “But, what I always knew was that the people of Indiana are common-sense, are willing to listen, and are a lot more focused on what’s right and building our state than they are worried about party labels.  “So, I never worried about party labels, and the other part is what you learn at Notre Dame is that you do your very best, you stand up for what is right, you try to have an effect on those things you can change, [but] on the things you have no control over, you can’t worry about them.” At Notre Dame, Donnelly majored in government and also studied business. “While I didn’t have a business degree or business minor, a lot of my electives were in the business area, so I tried to combine [government and business] while at Notre Dame,” he said. “I had an interest in becoming an attorney, and I think that mix really lent itself well to that field.” After graduation, Donnelly practiced law, worked at his family’s printing and rubber stamp company and served on the Indiana State Election Board. In 2004, he ran for and secured Indiana’s 2nd district congressional seat, and secured the seat in 2006. “I had never actually expected to run for office again,” Donnelly said. “That was probably for a 15-year period. I just raised my family and tried to be a good member of the local community, then was asked by members of the local Democratic Party if I would consider running for Congress.” Donnelly said serving as the representative for Indiana’s 2nd district prepared him to work as a senator for the state of Indiana.  “What made it easier is that in many ways, the 2nd district is a microcosm of the state, and the state is a microcosm of the country,” he said. “And so, the needs of the people of the 2nd district, the concerns of the people of the second district, were reflective of the entire state.”  Donnelly said his time in the House, in part, guided his goals as a senator. “I came in with areas that I wanted to focus on, based on my time in the House,” he said. “No. 1, first and foremost, would be that every Hoosier who wants a job, can have a job. When Mom and Dad are working, everything works much better for the family – everything works much better for our state. So, a huge portion of my efforts have been in making sure that we continue to grow our economy and create more jobs.” As a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Donnelly said resolving the United States’ involvement in Afghanistan sits at the top of his priority list. “I’ve been focused on making sure we have a solid plan to come home from Afghanistan, to do it in a way that enables Afghanistan to stand up on their own and have our men and women back home in South Bend and in Rising Sun and in Merrillville and in Indianapolis, rather than in Kabul,” he said. Donnelly is following the situation in Syria closely and soliciting opinions on the issue from his constituents, his communications director, Elizabeth Shappell, said.  “He supports President Obama’s decision to seek Congressional approval,” Shappell said. “Like all Hoosiers, he strongly condemns the use of chemical weapons and is carefully reviewing proposed options for ongoing humanitarian assistance and possible military action.”  Donnelly announced his support for same-sex marriage in an April 5 post on his Facebook page. His desire for all people to feel comfortable in Indiana motivated this decision, he said. “My feeling is that as we look at this, as a state, Indiana wants to be welcoming to all of our citizens,” Donnelly said. “To our brothers and sisters, our sons and daughters – I want them all to feel that no matter what their beliefs, they can find a home in Indiana. For our companies, [we don’t want them] to lose extraordinary talent and extraordinary people because we weren’t welcoming to them on this issue. “As I said, this is no way any suggestion to any Church as to what they [should] believe or what they should do. This is simply recognition that we want Indiana to be a welcoming state.” Donnelly said his experience in the House, his role as a father and talks with friends inform his policy positions. Staying connected to his constituents also shapes his actions as a senator.  “I go home every weekend,” Donnelly said. “There is so much more wisdom in Indiana than there is in Washington, D.C., and so in a typical day at home I’ll be visiting with a group of farmers. I’ll be visiting with a group of small business people. I’ll stop at the local supermarket to get something, and people are more than happy to come up and tell me what they think. “I get my knowledge, my wisdom, from everyone back home. … I keep that sign in the office up there, ‘Hoosier Common Sense,’ because that’s what we try to do. I think that is what the country needs, and that is what I try to reflect every day.” These frequent interactions with his constituents keep Donnelly grounded. “What I never forget is that I’m the hired help,” he said. “I work for everybody back home. That’s my obligation.” Donnelly’s connection to Notre Dame also shapes his beliefs, he said.  “I think [University President Fr. John Jenkins] is an extraordinary president,” Donnelly said. “I think [University President Emeritus Fr. Monk Malloy] was as well, and I went to school there when [University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh] was our president. Fr. Hesburgh made it very clear that you have an obligation to not only look out for yourself, but to look out for your brothers and sisters, and tried to make sure that everyone who graduated from Notre Dame understood that you had a bigger obligation than just making sure that you’re all squared away. “We’ve had extraordinary leadership. … Obviously, Our Lady really looks out for the school because of who she has put in charge.” Donnelly said he remains extremely grateful for his Notre Dame education, which continues to shape how he approaches the world around him. “I never in a million years expected to be able to go there,” he said. “I was just a middle-class kid; it was almost just beyond my wildest dreams. … What Notre Dame does is it colors the way you look at every issue so that it’s not just about yourself, or it’s not just about a narrow set of views. But you look at things in a way that says, ‘How does this affect all of us? How do we make our country better? How do we make our nation stronger? How do we do what is fair and what is just?’ “I say a little prayer that I can do that every day, and I’m far from perfect. I don’t hit a home run every day. But I do my best, and that was shaped in large measure by folks like my parents, by Fr. Hesburgh. … They ground you very well, and if I had to do it all over again I’d do it in a heartbeat. I wouldn’t go anywhere else.”  Contact Nicole Michels at [email protected]last_img read more

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Hurricane Isaac

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first_imgForecasters initially projected rains from Hurricane Isaac could erase or at least put a large dent in Georgia’s drought, but the state has seen little relief. “We thought that it would park over Georgia, and we would get a few days of rain, which could have wiped out the drought,” said Pam Knox, an agricultural climatologist with UGA Cooperative Extension. “Instead it moved further to the west than we thought. They’re getting way more than they need, and we really haven’t gotten very much.” While regular afternoon showers have picked up in some parts of the Georgia, about one-half of the state is still experiencing some level of drought. The hardest hit area is a wide swath across middle Georgia, Knox said. Some bands of rain did cut across parts of the state this week providing spotty relief, but not enough to do much more than moisten the soil. Streams, creeks and rivers are still extremely low, she said. “Every bit of rain we get is good, but it wasn’t enough to really change the drought situation … Some areas probably got a little drought relief, but it was spotty,” Knox said. “In the summer we really need about an inch a week to keep up with evaporation, and even with the storm some areas haven’t gotten that.” While the slow moving storm wreaks havoc on Louisiana and Mississippi, there’s a small chance that Georgia could see more precipitation related to systems as it pushes waves of moist air northward. Cloud cover generated by this moisture should keep temperatures cooler than normal for the next few days. As the bulk of the storm moves north, it will likely bring substantial drought relief to Midwestern states like Indiana and Illinois. But even then there’s a chance the storm could dump too much rain at one time, further damaging grain crops.last_img read more

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