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Watch The Magical Grateful Dead Concert That Occurred On This Day In 1977 [Full Video]

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first_img1977 was a golden year in Grateful Dead history. The band had thoroughly settled in with their newest additions, the Godchauxs, and were playing some of the best music of their career. As with most years of their career, the Dead spent most of the year on the road, performing across the country with eager fans following their every beckon call.The group kicked off a major spring tour on April 22nd, before settling into the Passaic, NJ Capitol Theatre for a three night run from 4/25 through 4/27. There was some serious magic in the air for the run’s finale, which saw the Dead open with Chuck Berry’s “Promised Land” and roar through an extended version of “Mississippi Half-Step.” Lengthy versions of “Sugaree,” “Scarlet Begonias / Fire On The Mountain,” “Terrapin Station” and “Morning Dew” highlight this particularly tasty treat.Another treat, of course, is the full video that has been captured by Music Vault and shared for your viewing pleasure. Sit back, relax, and enjoy the show:Setlist: Grateful Dead at Capitol Theatre, Passaic, NJ – 4/27/77Setlist:0:00:00 – Introduction0:01:49 – Promised Land0:05:22 – crowd noise0:07:06 – Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodeloo0:15:05 – crowd noise0:19:49 – Looks Like Rain0:27:10 – crowd noise0:29:19 – Sugaree0:40:48 – crowd noise0:43:02 – El Paso0:47:43 – crowd noise0:49:43 – Row Jimmy0:58:42 – crowd noise1:00:40 – New Minglewood Blues1:05:46 – Banter1:07:05 – Loser1:15:36 – crowd noise1:17:27 – The Music Never Stopped1:24:33 – Intermission1:35:44 – Estimated Prophet1:44:04 – crowd noise1:45:53 – Scarlet Begonias / Fire On The Mountain2:07:00 – crowd noise2:08:34 – Ramble On Rose2:15:42 – crowd noise2:18:32 – Samson And Delilah2:25:34 – crowd noise2:29:24 – Terrapin Station2:39:50 – Morning Dew2:52:00 – Banter3:02:46 – Johnny B. Goode[originally published 4/27/16]last_img read more

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Mike Gordon Joins Worship My Organ Supergroup In New Orleans [Video]

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first_imgWith Jazz Fest well underway, New Orleans is the place to be right now for late-night jams, unexpected collaborations, and non-stop musical marathons. On Sunday, New Orleans’ Little Gem Saloon hosted Worship My Organ, a late-night tradition that brings together world-renowned organ players.Jazz Fest After Dark: L4LM Top PicksSunday’s Worship My Organ late-night featured Hammond B3 organ masters Robert Walter and Marco Benevento complimented by drummer Adam Deitch, saxophonist Skerik, and DJ Logic. During the all-star cast’s performance, Phish bassist and Walter’s bandmate, Mike Gordon, joined in for some improvisational exploration. Playing around with a Moog and organ, Gordon traded off tasty licks with Walter and Benevento, backed by Deitch holding down a hard-hitting groove behind the kit.Luckily, there’s some fan-shot footage of Mike Gordon’s sit-in with Worship My Organ, which you can watch below:Worship My Organ w/ Mike Gordon – 4/28/2019[Video: Josh Valentine]On Friday, May 3rd, Gordon and Walter will regroup at New Orleans’ Joy Theater for a one-off performance with Gordon’s solo outfit. Tickets for Gordon’s upcoming New Orleans performance are still available here.last_img read more

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Natural flu-fighting protein discovered in human cells

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first_imgHarvard researchers report having discovered a family of naturally occurringantiviral agents in human cells, a finding that may lead to better ways to prevent and treat influenza and other viral infections.In both human and mouse cells the flu-fighting proteinsprevented or slowed most virus particles from infecting cells at theearliest stage in the virus lifecycle. The anti-viral action happenssometime after the virus attaches itself to the cell and before itdelivers its pathogenic cargo.“We’ve uncovered the first-line defense in how our bodies fight theflu virus,” said Stephen Elledge, the Gregor Mendel professor ofgenetics and of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and a seniorgeneticist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). “The protein isthere to stop the flu. Every cell has a constitutive immune responsethat is ready for the virus. If we get rid of that, the virus has aheyday.”“When we knocked the proteins out, we had more virus infection,” saidgeneticist Abraham Brass, an instructor in medicine at HMS and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), who led the study first as apostdoctoral fellow with Elledge and then in his ownlab at the Ragon Institute. “When we increased the proteins, we hadmore protection,” Brass said. The native antiviral defenders are also crucial after the cells areinfected, Brass and his co-authors found. In the cells, the proteinsaccounted for more than half of the protective effect of theinterferon immune response. Interferon orchestrates a large componentof the infection-fighting machinery.“Interferons gave the cells even more protection, but not if we tookaway the antiviral proteins,” Brass said. The study is publishedin today’s early on-line edition of the journal Cell.The potent interferon response is what makes people feel so sick whentheir bodies are fighting the flu or when receiving interferons astherapy. “If we can figure out ways to increase levels of thisprotein without interferon, we can potentially increase naturalresistance to some viruses without all the side effects of theinterferons,” Elledge said.In the study, the surprisingly versatile antiviral proteins protectedcells against several devastating human viruses-not only the currentinfluenza A strains including H1N1 and strains going back to the1930s, but also West Nile virus and dengue virus. While IFITM did notprotect against HIV or the hepatitis C virus, experiments suggestedthe protein may defend against others, including yellow fever virus.The researchers do not know how the antiviral proteins deflect thisvariety of viruses, which use different mechanisms of entry into thecell. The protein family, called interferon-inducible transmembraneproteins (IFITM), was first discovered 25 years ago as products ofone of the thousands of genes turned on by interferon. Since then,not much else has been discovered about the IFITM family. Versions ofthe IFITM genes are found in the genomes of many creatures, from fishto chickens to mice to people, suggesting the antiviral mechanism hasbeen working successfully for millions of years in protectingorganisms from viral infections.In Elledge’s lab, Brass began the study as a genetic screen to learnhow the body blocks the flu. The researchers had previously runsimilar screens with hepatitis C virus and with HIV. In the screen,the researchers used small interfering RNA to systematically knockdown one gene at a time by depleting the proteins the genes weretrying to make. Then they examined what effect each blocked gene hadon a cell’s response to influenza A virus.The screen revealed more than 120 genes with potential roles indifferent stages of infection. Four of those genes, when knockeddown, allowed for a robust increase in the infection of cells byinfluenza A virus. Of these four candidate “restriction factors,” theresearch team concentrated on the IFITM3 protein because of its knownlink to interferon and found two closely related proteins in theIFITM family with similar activity.The most distinctive property of the first-line IFITM3 defense is itspreventive action before the virus can fuse with the cell, saidco-author and virologist Michael Farzan, associate professor ofmicrobiology and molecular genetics at HMS and the New EnglandPrimate Research Center. “The virus is unable to make a protein inthe cell to counteract the IFITM proteins, because the cell isalready primed against the virus,” Farzan said. “To find somethingthat hits the flu and hits it so close to the entry stage of theviral life cycle is really interesting and unusual among viralrestriction factors.”The researchers have more questions than answers about how the IFITMrestriction factors actually work, but they are excited about therange of inquiry the discovery opens up. For example, variations inthe protein from person to person may explain differences in people’ssusceptibility to flu and other viral infections, as well as itsseverity, the researchers speculate.And if scientists can understand the mechanism of action, they may beable to design new therapies with even better antiviral actions. Theproteins themselves may be useful for defending against infections inanimals, like birds and pigs, which might prevent the emergence ofnew, potentially more dangerous influenza A strains.In another potential application, if IFITM3 has a role in the chickenembryos or canine cells used to make flu vaccines, inhibiting theproteins may speed up vaccine production, which has been an issuethis year with the manufacture of the H1N1 pandemic vaccine.The research was funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, thePhillip T. and Susan M. Ragon Foundation, the National Institutes ofHealth, New England Regional Center of Excellence for Biodefense,Cancer Research UK the Wellcome Trust, and the Kay Kendall LeukaemiaFoundation. BWH and MGH have filed a U.S. patent application for thistechnology that relates to the identification and use of host factorsto modulate viral replication/growth.last_img read more

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E.O. Wilson to lecture, co-host conservation benefit dinner

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first_imgE.O. Wilson, Pellegrino University Professor Emeritus, will host a lecture and benefit dinner with biologist Daniel H. Janzen, from the University of Pennsylvania, on Oct. 1. The event, titled “Biodiversity: Conserving Through Knowing,” is in support of conservation in Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), which is a tropical treasure of 163,000 hectares located in northwestern Costa Rica. The event includes a free public lecture and discussion followed by an optional ticketed dinner.Currently, the ACG comprises 2 percent of Costa Rica, and 2.6 percent of the world’s biodiversity — an estimated 230,000 species of plants and animals. It is the product of one of the world’s most successful habitat restoration and conservation efforts, and it supports research at the leading edge of ecology, evolutionary biology, biotechnology, biodevelopment, child education, and conservation. It is also a UNESCO World Heritage site.The lecture will take place at Tsai Auditorium, 1730 Cambridge St., at 6 p.m. Donations are encouraged. The benefit dinner will be held at 8 p.m. at UpStairs on the Square, and tickets are available here. All proceeds will benefit the Guanacaste Dry Forest Conservation Fund.For more information about this event, visit the fund’s website.last_img read more

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Director of Innovation Lab named

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first_imgGordon S. Jones has been named the inaugural director of the Harvard Innovation Lab, a new and innovative initiative set to launch in late 2011 that will foster team-based and entrepreneurial activities, and provide a forum, both physically and virtually, for interactions among students, faculty, alumni, and the surrounding community. Located at 125 Western Ave. in Allston, which formerly housed the WGBH-TV offices and studios, the Innovation Lab will complement Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino’s innovation agenda and help revitalize Western Avenue.Jones, who will officially assume his duties on May 9, will serve as a key part of the lab’s planning and design team, helping to define and develop programs, build relationships within and beyond campus, and create an environment that will attract and support student innovators and enhance team activity. Additionally, he will develop and manage the operations of the lab and design programs to link thought leaders together with Innovation Lab occupants.In addition to 15 years of marketing and sales experience with Fortune 500, mid-size, and start-up companies in the consumer goods industry, Jones has both an impressive history of entrepreneurial activity and academic experience mentoring up-and-coming entrepreneurs. “With his extensive background helping undergraduate and graduate students, as well as his work with entrepreneurial ventures and his strong ties to Harvard University, Gordon is a superb choice for this new and important position,” said Joseph Lassiter, professor of management practice at Harvard Business School and faculty co-chair of the Harvard Innovation Lab. “He has the skills to build relationships between students and local entrepreneurs, create partnerships with area small business organizations, and develop a center of innovation that fully brings to life the spirit of innovation present throughout the wider University and community.”Read the full announcement.last_img read more

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OFA awards 8 students for artistic excellence

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first_imgThe Office for the Arts at Harvard (OFA) and the Council on the Arts at Harvard, a standing committee of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, have announced the recipients of the annual undergraduate arts prizes for 2011.The awards, presented to more than 100 undergraduates over the past 28 years, recognize outstanding accomplishments in the arts undertaken during a student’s time at Harvard.The 2011 OFA student prize award winners follow:Charlie Albright ’11 is the recipient of the Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts. The prize recognizes outstanding artistic talent and achievement in the composition or performance of music, drama, dance, or the visual arts. This prize honors the sum of a student’s artistic activities at Harvard.Julia Rooney ’11 and Katherine Tygielski ’11 are recipients of the Council Prize in Visual Arts. The prize recognizes outstanding work in the field of visual arts.Liz Krane ’11 received the Louise Donovan Award. The award recognizes a Harvard student who has done outstanding work behind the scenes in the arts (e.g., as a producer, accompanist, set designer, or mentor and leader in the undergraduate arts world).Bridget Haile ’11 is the recipient of the Radcliffe Doris Cohen Levi Prize. The prize recognizes a Harvard College student who combines talent and energy with outstanding enthusiasm for musical theater at Harvard and honors the memory of Doris Cohen Levi, Radcliffe ’35.Kevin Shee ’11 and Elizabeth Walker ’11 are recipients of the Suzanne Farrell Dance Award. Named for the acclaimed dancer and former prima ballerina of the New York City Ballet, the prize recognizes a Harvard undergraduate who has demonstrated outstanding artistry in the field of dance.Garrett McEntee ’11 is the recipient of the Alan Symonds Award. The award, administered by OFA and given by the Harvard-Radcliffe Gilbert & Sullivan Players (HRG&SP) in honor of Alan Symonds, HRG&SP alumnus and former technical director for Harvard College Theater, recognizes outstanding work in technical theater and commitment to mentoring fellow student technicians.For more on the prize winners and their achievements.last_img read more

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Using medical technology wisely

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first_imgThe infrastructure is now in place to use new informational technologies in the American health care system effectively. But a former White House official tasked with improving health care technologies said the challenge is to ensure that innovations do not deepen existing disparities in health care, and instead provide care more effectively across communities.David Blumenthal, who until last month was national coordinator for health information technology, outlined the potential and the pitfalls of additions such as electronic health records as part of the Reede Scholars’ Second Annual Health Equity Symposium on May 12.His was “not a program about technology, although health technology is in the title; this is a program about health care,” said Blumenthal, the Samuel O. Thier Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, during the program on “eEquity: Leveraging Technology to Achieve Health Equity.”“It operates under the assumption that information is the lifeblood of medicine and that we are only as powerful as the information we have, whether we are a nurse practitioner, a physician, or a respiratory therapist.”Still, “there is the enduring observation that new technologies do not disseminate evenly in our society,” Blumenthal said. From imaging devices to new asthma treatment, such innovations reach some vulnerable populations later than others. Yet Blumenthal emphasized the progress made. A significant market in producing health information technology programs has emerged, sparked by a new incentive program, he said.This has “created a market where there hadn’t been a market before for the use of health information technology,” Blumenthal said.In early spring, 260 providers, mostly under Medicaid provisions, have received $84 million in “meaningful use payments,” Blumenthal said. About 67,000 registered providers, mostly primary care doctors in small practices, will receive help from 62 new technical centers. “That’s a substantial penetration,” he said.About 7,000 students have been enrolled in 84 community college programs to receive training that will support new medical information technology, he added, saying, “There is increasing coordination between this high tech agenda and the health reform agenda.”Even with the explosion of new products, Blumenthal warned that minority groups may be slower in reaping the benefits of such innovations as electronic medical records.“We can make these efforts through central governmental intervention, but the best long-range solution … is to level the playing field in the health care system as a whole,” he said. “What we need is more of the kind of leadership that brought us health reform.”During a question-and-answer period, Blumenthal made a key observation: “What you have to realize is that everyone you run into who has been paying taxes, has put $100 toward the adoption of electronic health records. Every man, woman, and child in the U.S. is paying $100 for this to happen.“I think that’s a pretty good deal for providers. I think this is a unique investment and an amazing commitment that is really up now to providers to deliver.”The symposium, which was moderated by Lenny Lopez, an internist trained at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, featured remarks by Joseph R. Betancourt, director of the Disparities Solutions Center. There were presentations by Quyen Ngo-Metzger, data branch chief in the Bureau of Primary Health Care at Health Resources and Services Administration; by oral surgeon Elsbeth Kalenderian on improving links between medical and dental practices; and by John Moore, a Ph.D. candidate in the New Media Medicine group at the MIT Media Lab, on possible new devices.Moore wowed the audience with a peek at emerging technology aimed at educating and empowering patients by, for example, letting them see and manipulate visual data on the effect of medication in their bloodstream, or by a stethoscope that would let doctors and patients hear heartbeats. The goal — something underscored by questions from the audience — was to replace the scenario of a doctor staring at a computer screen to one in which physician and patient look at data together to develop medical regimens.last_img read more

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Century-old tortilla chip in a Harvard collection

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first_imgA beetle necklace, Mark Twain’s microscope, a 19th-century slate bearing “messages” from the spirit world, and a 100-year-old Mexican tortilla — given more than 350 years, you can collect some bizarre and fascinating items.Harvard has been collecting things for a long time, probably beginning with the donation of a library by its namesake, John Harvard, upon his death in 1638. Since then, the university has amassed more than 50 collections, not including libraries…Read more herelast_img

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The right place, the Wright time

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first_imgThis is one in a series of profiles showcasing some of Harvard’s stellar graduates.Keith Wright calls his decision to come to Harvard “the best in my life.” Crimson basketball fans would agree. The 6-foot-8-inch forward and his teammates have made history since he arrived in 2008, transforming a losing program into one of the Ivy League’s most successful. In March, the team won the league championship outright — a first for Harvard — and made its first trip to the NCAA Men’s Division 1 Basketball Championship Tournament since 1946.With Wright leading the team in rebounding and blocked shots, the Crimson also broke the program record for wins in each of the past three seasons.Wright says he cherishes the memory of every game he played in a Crimson uniform.“My experience playing for Harvard will stay with me for the rest of my life,” he said. “I was part of the team that took Harvard to the NCAA tournament for the first time in 60 years. I was the captain of the best team in Harvard history, the one that won its first Ivy League title. It was a great honor that I won’t forget.”Along the way, Wright racked up an impressive string of awards and accolades. During the 2010-11 season, he was named Ivy League Player of the Year, was selected to the Lou Henson All-America Team and the All-Ivy first team, and received an honorable mention as an Associated Press All-American.  Last year, Wright landed on the Preseason Top 50 Watch List for the Wooden Award, which is given to the top player in college basketball. He was also named one of college basketball’s top 100 players by CBS Sports.Despite his success on the court, Wright says that he came to Harvard because he’s more than “just a basketball player.”“I’m a student first,” Wright said. “A lot of kids put all their chips into this sport to help them be successful. At Harvard, all our chips are put into academics. People know that. They don’t say ‘Oh, wow, he plays basketball.’ They say “Wow, he’s at Harvard, and he’s playing basketball. He’s a smart kid.”Wright’s interest in human relationships inspired him to concentrate in psychology as an undergraduate. He said that Holly Parker’s course “The Psychology of Close Relationships” had a profound impact on him and may even have determined his future career path.“Seeing Dr. Parker talk about the field — and her passion for it — definitely influenced me,” he said. “Being a couples counselor is something I’d like to pursue after I’m done playing basketball.”For now, graduate school will have to wait as Wright pursues his immediate goal of playing professional basketball. In April, the Harvard star was one of only 64 college seniors invited to play in the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament in front of dozens of pro agents and scouts. Wright said that advice from former teammate and Harvard-to-NBA trailblazer Jeremy Lin helped him to hold his own against some of the best young players in the country.“Jeremy told me to have fun and play my game,” he said. “He told me not to think too much about it, just know that I’m a good player. At the end of the day, the chance to show my skills and play for money is a blessing.”Wright said that his next move is to sign with an agent and participate in workouts for pro teams in advance of June’s NBA draft. If he’s not picked by one of the league’s franchises, Wright said he’ll participate in the Las Vegas and Orlando free agent summer leagues in hopes of catching on with a team. He’d even consider a stint for a team overseas, although he calls that option a “worst-case scenario.”Whatever happens, Wright said that his Harvard experience will enable him to keep athletics in perspective, and will give him options after he walks off the court for the last time.“I don’t let basketball use me,” he said. “I use basketball to help me. The success of Harvard’s team has really been icing on the cake because I know that, after the ball stops bouncing, I’m going to have this great education, the connections that I made here, and the limitless resources that I have at my fingertips. After college, I’ll pursue my dream knowing that I have nothing to lose.”last_img read more

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Empowering discussions at GEM12

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first_imgPolicy makers, development experts and academics gathered at the Harvard Kennedy School in late October to develop “Trillion Dollar Ideas to Build Prosperity,” which was the theme for this year’s Global Empowerment Meeting (GEM12), sponsored by the Center for International Development (CID).The fifth in a series, GEM12 continued last year’s discussions on new strategies for accelerating growth and unlocking the economic potential of developing countries. It offered a platform for engaging new ideas while promoting direct interaction between those who create the ideas, and the implementers and supporters necessary to give the concepts “legs.”Meeting topics ranged from “Building a State Capability: The PDIA Approach” to “Emotion, Reason and Moral Progress.” Each expert presented a synopsis of their ideas and the sessions concluded with an open discussion between panelists and audience members.last_img read more

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