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Worlds of promise

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first_img Harvard to host more than a dozen sessions during second Boston festival celebrating innovation, creativity The people wearing the giant goggles and laughing, ducking, jumping, and wildly waving their arms weren’t the only ones having fun.“Watching people in visual reality is the best thing,” said a man as he waited for a chance to don a large black headset and hand-held controllers and take a turn as a professional hockey goalie deflecting virtual pucks.“Dude, it’s addicting,” said another, fresh from a trip to the ocean floor and a close encounter with a blue whale. Across the hall, a line formed for a motion simulator that mimicked a shaking race car, taking headset-wearing users for a spin on a virtual speedway.For a real-world observer at the Harvard Innovation Lab (i-lab) on Wednesday, the entertainment potential of visual and augmented reality was abundantly clear.But what many consider the next great tech revolution isn’t only about fun. Experts say it has the potential to transform business, art, education, science, design, manufacturing, and medicine. It’s also expected to be worth $100 billion by 2020.The future of virtual and augmented reality was the theme of a HUBweek event that attracted scholars, students, scientists, educators, entrepreneurs, and software developers along with the merely curious for an afternoon of demonstrations and discussions.In the coming weeks the i-lab will open its own augmented reality-virtual reality lab, said Jodi Goldstein, the facility’s Bruce and Bridgitt Evans Managing Director. Goldstein introduced the keynote address, featuring Rony Abovitz video-linked to the talk via a rolling robot. Abovitz, an entrepreneur who made his mark with computer-assisted surgery, is the man behind what Goldstein called “one of the most mysterious yet highly transformative ventures in this space”: Magic Leap Inc. At HUBweek, ideas for living Related Abovitz’s firm is developing “Mixed Reality Lightfield,” a combination of virtual reality, in which users wear goggles and look into a screen that simulates an alternate universe; augmented reality, which takes a person’s view of the real world and layers on top of it things such as Pokémon characters or maps of the nearest subway stops; and light fields.The technology fits perfectly with the brain’s spatially oriented visual-processing mechanism, said Abovitz, and will open a world of discovery to those who have struggled to transfer two-dimensional information or text into “spatial learning.”“I think it will make life easier for a lot of people and open doors for a lot of people because we are making technology fit how our brains evolved into the physics of the universe rather than forcing our brains to adapt to a more limited technology,” said the Magic Leap president and CEO, whose hopes for the technology include, among other things, parking a virtual “Star Wars” X-wing in his driveway.A range of discussions highlighted the practical applications of virtual reality. In a session on surgery and rehabilitation, Jayender Jagadeesan, an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School, described research at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in which a modified Oculus Rift augmented-reality headset is helping surgeons determine a tumor’s exact location.The future of visual and augmented reality moved into the world of surgery and rehabilitation during the HUBweek event, which attracted a full house at the i-lab. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer“You can pull in any of the patient’s specific imaging, while the surgeon is actually doing this procedure,” Jagadeesan said of the multiple diagnostic screens a physician can instantly access while wearing the headset during an operation.Chris Dede of the Harvard Graduate School of Education discussed his work on a suite of virtual and augmented reality applications for young learners.“You can be in a classroom in the middle of the winter, but psychologically you are at a pond or a forest in the middle of the summer,” said Dede, the Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies, of ecoMUVE, a technology that uses immersive virtual environments to teach students about delicate ecosystems.In the i-lab’s exhibit hall visitors had access to a range of experiences and applications, including a round rolling camera developed to help first responders assess dangerous situations and a wearable device that lets users feel virtual objects.Among the Harvard undergrads at the event was Madeleine Woods ’19, who was on site with Harvard College Virtual Reality, or Convrgency. The organization aims to bring students together to explore the creative potential of virtual reality.Woods, a joint concentrator in folklore and mythology and English with a secondary in archaeology, described herself as a theater kid who loves the arts and humanities along with coding and technology. She said virtual reality merges her varied interests, calling it both “empathetic” and “humanistic.”“This is the first time I think technology really opens people up,” said Woods. “You can experience the life of someone else across the world. You can see something you’ve never [seen in person]. I think you can understand people so much better when you can walk in their shoes, and this is something that literally puts that technology in hand.”SaveSaveSavelast_img read more

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Recovery workers urged to use caution around utility lines

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first_imgWith so much activity taking place around overhead and underground electrical equipment in the wake of Hurricane Irene, Central Vermont Public Service is warning workers to be careful to avoid situations involving contact with these types of devices. In some areas, utilities may have lost the ground-to-cable clearances they had prior to the flood. Vermont utilities urge all contractors and state and federal agencies to use caution along power lines, and encourage them to report any ‘defects’ to the utility systems, such as low-hanging lines, they may notice in the field. Central Vermont Public Service offers the following tips to help contractors stay safe during the recovery: Remember to stay at least 10 feet away from electrical lines with equipment such as crane booms and cables, excavators, backhoes and raised dump bodies.Stay away from and do not handle any downed utility cables. Report such conditions to the power company, and keep others away as well. Do not assume that since they’re down that they’re de-energized. Do not try to move them out of your way; either by hand or with your equipment.Please report any washed out or dangling poles and their support devices.Please report any washed out underground utility cables and stay clear of them.Please report any low-hanging utility cables and stay clear of them. Remember ground to overhead cable clearances may not be what they were prior to the flood. To contact CVPS, call 800-649-2877.last_img read more

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Tax evasion law “could cost big banks $100 million”

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first_img 213 Views   no discussions MILAN (Reuters) – A U.S. law aimed at curbing tax evasion by citizens using foreign accounts could cost large multinational banks as much as $100 million apiece to implement in one-off systems costs, a top asset manager and a tax lawyer told a conference on Friday.The overall costs of implementing the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), could approach the more than $8 billion FATCA is due to raise over 10 years, he said.FATCA was introduced after high profile tax evasion cases.“With FATCA there is a cost on us in Europe but benefits in the U.S.. The benefit is $8.5 bln over 10 years … for multinational banks I have seen estimates of $100 million (each, in one-off costs),” said James Broderick, head of Europe, Middle East and Africa for JP Morgan Asset Management.“It would be easier to just write a cheque to the IRS (U.S. tax authority)”, he added.The $100 million figure is with regard to the costs of implementation for the banking systems of large, multi-jurisdictional banks, and not for an asset manager, he said.Speaking at the same conference, organized by Italy’s asset management association Assogestioni, tax expert Keith Lawson said he had also heard the $100 mln figure.Lawson, Senior Counsel Tax Law at ICI, the U.S. national association of U.S. investment companies, said aspects of FATCA were “draconian” but a repeal would be very difficult given the amount it would raise.Broderick said banks and wealth managers had to accept that FATCA, which starts coming into force in June 2013, would be implemented and they may have to change their business models.FATCA has drawn wide criticism from abroad, with banks and business people saying the new law turns them into agents of the IRS.Writing by Nigel Tutt; Editing by Greg MahlichYAHOO News Tweet LifestyleMoney Tax evasion law “could cost big banks $100 million” by: – November 18, 2011 Sharecenter_img Share Share Sharing is caring!last_img read more

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