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Liverpool still in for Fekir? Could they get Asensio or Vasquez instead?

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first_img Kevin De Bruyne ‘loves Man City and wants to keep winning’, reveals father LATEST 2 Mohamed Salah has signed a new long-term contract with Liverpool, committing his future to Anfield until 2023. (talkSPORT)Liverpool have been tipped to sign Asensio from Real Madrid as a potential alternative to Fekir. Klopp would have to smash the club’s transfer record for a second time to sign the Spain international after Virgil Van Dijk’s huge £75million arrival. (The Sun)The Reds are also in the hunt for Madrid star Vazquez, according to reports in Spain. (Marca)Klopp was reportedly angered by the club’s failure to sign Fekir from Lyon. A deal worth £53 million was cancelled at the 11th hour following the France midfielder’s medical. Although, according to reports over the weekend, Liverpool still expect to complete his signing. (Daily Mirror)However, the Times insist Liverpool have not reopened talks with Fekir and that reports suggesting a deal is being renegotiated are false. (Times)Liverpool have been handed a boost in their pursuit of Sporting Lisbon’s Gelson Martins. The 23-year-old was heavily-linked with a move to Benfica, but his agent denied the rumours on Facebook. (Metro) 2 Butland was rumoured to be a Liverpool target Jack Butland will NOT be joining the Reds this summer, with the England goalkeeper set to stay at Stoke. This comes as a setback for Klopp, who has been hunting for a new No. 1 since Loris Karius’ shocking Champions League final display. (Daily Express)Adam Lallana could leave Anfield after the arrivals of Naby Keita and Fabinho. The England international, who was left at home for the Three Lions’ World Cup campaign, faces a battle to get into the Reds’ starting XI next term and could seek a new challenge elsewhere. (Liverpool Echo) Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Fekir’s future remains uncertain RANKED LIVING THE DREAM The biggest market value losers in 2019, including Bale and ex-Liverpool star Arsenal transfer news LIVE: Ndidi bid, targets named, Ozil is ‘skiving little git’ center_img Man United joined by three other clubs in race for Erling Haaland LATEST TRANSFER NEWS Liverpool have been busy in the transfer market this summer, but Jurgen Klopp’s desperate hunt for a creative midfielder and a goalkeeper continues.Is the Nabil Fekir deal still on? Could the Reds sign Marco Asensio or Lucas Vasquez instead? Get all the latest from the papers and online here: targets moving on targets IN DEMAND Tony Cascarino backs Everton to sign two strikers for Carlo Ancelotti REVEALED Cavani ‘agrees’ to join new club and will complete free transfer next summer Where every Premier League club needs to strengthen in January last_img read more

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Little Bugs with Mighty Powers

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first_img(Visited 576 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Bugs so small you could step on them, but if we were their size, we could never do what they do.G-ForceThis Beetle Can Withstand 40 Times More G-Force Than a Fighter Pilot (National Geographic). Ever watched a click beetle? Maybe not since you were a kid. These amazing beetles can leap up into the air and right themselves when they have fallen on their backs. Liz Langley writes, “Click beetles are among nature’s many unsung acrobats with clever strategies for escape.” There are 900 species of click beetles that use this trick. Here’s how it works:When threatened, the insect will contract a hinge that holds together two segments of its body, says Gal Ribak of Tel-Aviv University’s Biomechanics of Animal Locomotion Laboratory.Releasing that elastic energy causes an audible click and accelerates the beetles into the air at 380 times the force of gravity—leaving predators mystified.Langley includes accounts of other animals that are “aerialists that perform amazing airborne feats—sometimes with no feets at all.” A Moroccan spider named flic flac, for instance, can cartwheel away from danger, even going uphill. And a spider in Trinidad can whirl in circles so fast, it looks like a blur to the human eye. The article briefly mentions birds that walk down tree trunks, flying rays, pirouetting sharks, and has a 32-photo gallery of various leaping animals, including birds, fish and mammals.Magnetic NavigationNavigating with the sixth sense: desert ants sense Earth’s magnetic field (University of Würzburg). It’s unbelievable enough that salmon and sea turtles could navigate by the earth’s magnetic field, but ants? Such tiny insects; how do they do it? Researchers at the University of Würzburg, using controlled magnetic conditions, found that they indeed can. The details can be read in an open-access paper in Current Biology. The press release says,Desert ants (Cataglyphis) spend the first weeks of their life exclusively in their dark underground nest. For around four weeks, they nurse the queen and the brood, dig tunnels, build chambers or tidy up. At some point, they leave the nest to start their outdoor career, working as foragers until their death.Before an ant sets out to forage, it has to calibrate its navigational system, however. For this purpose, the insects exhibit a rather peculiar behaviour during two to three days: They perform so-called learning walks to explore the vicinity of the nest entrance and frequently turn about their vertical body axes while doing so. High-speed video recordings show that the ants stop repeatedly during these pirouetting motions. What is special about the longest of these stopping phases is that at this moment the ants always look back precisely to the nest entrance, although they are unable to see the tiny hole in the ground.Researchers from the Biocenter of the University of Würzburg have now made the surprising discovery that the desert ant uses the Earth’s magnetic field as orientation cue during these calibration trips. This ability had been previously unknown for desert ants.Dragonfly (Corel Professional Photos)AerogelWorld’s oldest insect inspires a new generation of aerogels (Newcastle University). When dragonflies complete their metamorphosis, their wings come out out like jelly, but within minutes they expand and become completely dry. Inspired by what they saw, the wizards at Newcastle University designed an aerogel that mimics the dragonfly’s secret. They tell how they did it, but more interesting are the dragonflies themselves. If they evolved, like this article claims, it means that some of the most advanced insect flyers just popped into existence without ancestors.“These ancient insects were around long before the dinosaurs evolved,“ explains Dejan Kulijer, from the National Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina.“They are one of the oldest insect groups to take flight and include the largest insect that ever lived – the Griffenfly – that had a wingspan of more than 70 cm” [28 inches].Their wings are a porous, layered structure similar to an aerogel and are so strong and light they can carry the insect up to 30 miles in an hour.“A dragonfly’s wings are an ultralight aerogel – making up less than 2% of the insect’s total body weight – and yet they are so strong they can carry the insect thousands of miles across oceans and between continents,” says Dr Šiller, who worked on the research together with colleagues from Newcastle University, Durham University and Limerick University, Ireland, as well as experts from the National Museum of Bosnia and Herzegovina.Jumps and LeapsWhy a robot can’t yet outjump a flea: How small creatures generate world’s fastest snaps, jumps and punches (Duke University Today). No robot designer has been able to imitate the mighty leap of the tiny flea. These insects jump so fast and far, they seem to vanish from sight. The opening of this fun article shows a flea jumping in slow motion, but mentions that it’s not the only champion in the animal olympics. Here are more challengers for robot designers:Take the smashing mantis shrimp, a small crustacean not much bigger than a thumb. Its hammer-like mouthparts can repeatedly deliver 69-mile-per-hour wallops more than 100 times faster than the blink of an eye to break open hard snail shells.Or the unassuming trap-jaw ant: In a zero-to-60 matchup, even the fastest dragster would have little chance against its snapping mandibles, which reach speeds of more than 140 miles per hour in less than a millisecond to nab their prey.One of the fastest accelerations known on Earth is the hydra’s sting. These soft-bodied aquatic creatures defend themselves with help from capsules along their tentacles that act like pressurized balloons. When triggered, they fire a barrage of microscopic poison spears that briefly accelerate 100 times faster than a bullet.Another video clip in the article shows a trap-jaw ant launching itself into the air with its mandible. It had to be filmed at 3,000 frames per second to see the action. Also praised in the article are the chameleon, the Venus flytrap, and the froghopper:A short-legged insect called the froghopper, for example, has a bow-like structure called the pleural arch that acts like a spring. Latch-like protrusions on their legs control its release, allowing them to leap more than 100 times their body length despite their short legs. A person with that much power could jump nearly two football fields.Each of these feats, the article explains, doesn’t require muscle action. They work with spring-loaded parts that fire like a taut bowstring. The paper in Science Magazine delves into “The principles of cascading power limits in small, fast biological and engineered systems,” describing a new model designed at Duke to explain the power requirements and specifications for such powerful leaps. The press release explains why robot makers can’t yet match these natural achievements:The model has major implications for engineers. It suggests that robots can’t yet outjump a flea in part because such quick, repeatable movements require components to be exquisitely fine-tuned to each other.Don’t tell the Discovery Institute. Incidentally, a new species of fossil dragonfly was named after the Revolutionary, Dr Michael Behe (Evolution News).The wonders of nature inspire kids. The wonders of nature inspire adults. The wonders of nature inspire scientists and engineers. Anyone left out? There is one thing that reduces inspiration, like poking a hole in a hot air balloon. It’s the idea that these wonders just happened by chance. Darwinian hot air is not sufficient to substitute for the fires of inspiration lit by the wonders of nature. Keep those Darwinists with their spears away from the big, beautiful balloon celebration.Credit: J.B. Greenelast_img read more

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Remembering Boutros Boutros-Ghali

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first_imgIt was a tricky global environment when Boutros Boutros-Ghali became the secretary-general of the United Nations in 1992. The world was emerging from the Cold War and countries were redefining relationships with each other. He navigated a new path for the organisation.United Nations Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali addresses the International Conference on Population and Developments in Cairo on 5 September 1994 to produce a Programme of Action. (Image: UN Photo, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, via Flickr) • Connecting women to technology  • South Africa’s competitive advantage in the developing world  • South African feminist a global voice for women  • UN launches Mandela Rules for prisoners • UN awards first Nelson Mandela prize Priya PitamberBoutros Boutros-Ghali became the sixth secretary-general of the United Nations (UN) on 1 January 1992, when he began his five-year term at the helm of the global organisation. He died on 16 February 2016 at the age of 93.“We pay tribute to the former UN secretary-general and wish to convey our deepest condolences to his family and his country, Egypt,” said President Jacob Zuma on his death. “May his soul rest in peace.”Born in Cairo, Boutros-Ghali was the first African to hold the position of secretary-general of the UN. During his tenure, the world was in a “critical post-Cold War period when the world body was redefining itself and engaging in more international peacekeeping operations that often received criticism for its efforts”, said the Presidency.Time of promise and perilAddressing the General Assembly’s special tribute at UN Headquarters in New York, current Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Boutros-Ghali had both the fortune and the misfortune to serve as the first post-Cold War UN chief.“While the United Nations was never as paralysed during the Cold War as many have portrayed, the new dynamic gave the organisation new leeway to act,” Ban said. “This brought promise and peril – and Mr Boutros-Ghali experienced both.Memory of former Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali honoured at the UN, see more: https://t.co/TPqYWDcec1 pic.twitter.com/Wci00qhHbE — United Nations (@UN) February 18, 2016“Perhaps he was too direct for some; he might have been too professorial for others. Some definitely found him too independent – a goal that he considered among the highest virtues for any secretary-general of the United Nations,” said Ban.He described Boutros-Ghali as relentless in defending the organisation and its charter, and quoted the former secretary-general:“With all the convulsions in global society, only one power is left that can impose order on incipient chaos: it is the power of principles transcending changing perceptions of expediency.”Boutros-Ghali broke barriers & new ground – @UN_Radio covers Friday’s #UNGA tribute https://t.co/LJJ6fo4jh6 pic.twitter.com/ldpRS4uXMM — United Nations (@UN) February 19, 2016Career highlightsSoon after Boutros-Ghali was inaugurated, the UN Security Council met in it’s first-ever summit of Heads of State and requested a report on the way the organisation could strengthen capacity for preventive diplomacy, peace-making and peacekeeping. It resulted in a report, penned by Boutros-Ghali, called An Agenda for Peace.“As secretary-general, he presided over a dramatic rise in UN peacekeeping,” Ban told reporters. “He also presided over a time when the world increasingly turned to the United Nations for solutions to its problems, in the immediate aftermath of the Cold War.”Boutros Boutros-Ghali, secretary-general of the United Nations, with President Nelson Mandela at the presidential residence in Pretoria on an official visit to South Africa on 26 April 1996. (Image: John Isaac, UN Photo, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, via Flickr)In his article celebrating 70 years of the UN, Boutros-Ghali wrote that the invention of peacekeeping was one of the organisation’s proud moments.Another standout moment for him was the declaration of human rights and the World Conference on Human Rights held at Vienna in 1993. “There have been many conferences setting world agendas and goals before and after Vienna, but for the world to come together to define human rights, and to state clearly a global commitment to their achievement, was an important moment in history,” Boutros-Ghali wrote.See more from Boutros Boutros-Ghali’s tenure as Secretary-General in @UN_Photo gallery: https://t.co/fcoW75ZBqP pic.twitter.com/3CTQvjkMJu — United Nations (@UN) February 18, 2016Watch more on his appointment to the UN:About Boutros-GhaliBoutros-Ghali was born in Cairo on 14 November 1922. He received a Bachelor of Law degree from Cairo University in 1946 and diplomas from Paris University in subjects such as political science, economics and public law. He received his PhD in international law from Paris University in 1949.He became Professor of International Law and International Relations at Cairo University, and from 1974 to 1977, he was a member of the Central Committee and Political Bureau of the Arab Socialist Union.He “had a long association with international affairs as a diplomat, jurist, scholar and widely published author”, according to his profile on the UN website.He became a member of the Egyptian parliament in 1987 and was a member of the secretariat of the National Democratic Party from 1980. Until assuming the office of secretary-general of the UN, he was also vice-president of the Socialist International.Boutros-Ghali was also part of the Camp David Summit Conference in September 1978, which resulted in the Camp David Accords between Egypt and Israel, signed in 1979.“He led many delegations of his country to meetings of the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) and the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, as well as to the Summit Conference of the French and African Heads of State. He also headed Egypt’s delegation to the General Assembly sessions in 1979, 1982 and 1990.” Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali (third from right) visits with young residents of a UN-supported orphanage on 22 October 1993, operated by the Irish humanitarian organisation GOAL. To the left of the secretary-general is Brigadier General Maurice Quadri, commander of the French contingent of the Second United Nations Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM II). (Image: F Ribere, UN Photo, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, via Flickr)In celebrating the 70th anniversary of the UN, Boutros-Ghali wished to build on past achievements and update it for a changing, modern world. “Just as the United Nations invented peacekeeping, we now need to modernise the practice, and the Security Council’s use of the instruments at its disposal to promote international peace and security. We need a new Agenda for Peace,” he wrote.last_img read more

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SA olive oils winning awards

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first_imgMusa Mkalipi Nick Wilkinson, SA Olive chairperson says that consumption of olive oil in SA has grown by roughly 20% per annum over the past eight years.(Image: Suidwes) The olive oil industry is one of the fastest growing agricultural activities in the South Africa.(Image:fornobravo)MEDIA CONTACTS • Nick Wilkinson  SA Olive chairperson   +27 82 688 0578 RELATED ARTICLES • SA olive oil is the best, study shows • SA olive oil hit in Italy • Paying it forward with goat farming • Kilimo Salama farmers’ safetyFive locally produced olive oils were named the Absa top five olive oils at this year’s South African Olive Oil Awards. The oils were judged by a panel of qualified olive oil tasters. The top five places were taken by Porterville Olives, which claimed two positions, followed by De Rustica Olive, Gabrielskloof and Rio Largo Olive Estate. All the oils were in the intense style, which is characterised by a bitter and spicy taste. Other styles are medium, which is semi bitter, grassy and clean, as well as the delicate style, which is a milder oil used for delicate dishes.The competition gave recognition to and rewarded producers that attained different technical levels of quality with bronze, silver and gold medals. A total of 43 oils received gold medals, 13 for intense quality olive oils, 24 for medium and six for delicate style; 39 received silver medals while 14 received bronze medals. “We can say unequivocally that the vast majority of locally produced extra virgin olive oils are of a superior standard,” said Nick Wilkinson, the chairman of the SA Olive Industry Association (SAO). SAO is a non-profit association that represents the common interests of the South African olive industry. The tastings and awards were made over a period of four days in August. Marbrin Olive Growers, nestled in Robertson in the Breede River Valley in Western Cape, was one of the winners, bagging a total of three gold medals. Briony Coetsee, the marketing manager at the farm, was pleased with the win; however, she said that the olive oil industry was not without its trials. “The success is not financial yet as South Africans do not appreciate locally produced products.” Another big winner was Oakhurst Olives from Tulbagh, also in Western Cape. It was the recipient of two gold medals as well as two silver medals. Pieter du Toit, the managing director of Oakhurst, said that this showed the farm was producing good olive oil. This year’s South African Olive Oil Awards had a record number of more than a hundred entries, representing a 58% increase over 2012. It was the highest number of locally produced oils to compete in the competition since its inception eight years ago. “The judges follow an internationally recognised method of scoring the oils within categories of delicate, medium and intense. The oil is judged for its aroma, bitterness and pungency as well as the balance between these characteristics,” explained Wilkinson. The entries went through a series of blind tastings by the panel of judges using an internationally recognised method of scoring the oils. “Olive oil must have a great smell and must smell like something green such as grass or olive leaves. It must also be free of any defects,” said Benedetta Lami, one on the judges. Other categories included the Lifelong Achievement Award, given to the judging panel for their contribution to the local olive industry. Recipients included Gerrie Duvenage, Reni Hildenbrand, Louise Rabie, Robert Claasens, Leonard Arangies, Lami and Anna-Marie Ferreira. Lastly, the Mentorship Award was given to individuals who mentored the new generation of olive growers. All entries included a chemical analysis of the oil. A booming industry South Africa is one of the leading olive oil producers in the world based on quality, taking top positions at international olive oil competitions, says the Olive Oil Times. Production in the country has doubled in the last four years and with current trees planted growth will continue annually, with the expectation of import replacement. Consumption of olive oil has grown by roughly 20% a year over the last eight years says SAO. Approximately six million litres is consumed, of which two million is produced locally. Olive farming is one of the fastest growing agricultural activities in the country, with over 70 registered producers. South Africa produces 3 000 tons of olives each year, while 2 000 tons are imported. Wilkinson said: “A small percentage of South African production is exported but this is increasing annually due to the superior quality of South African production. The retailers are the biggest importers, either directly or through their respective agents.” Challenges in the industry The olive oil industry is not without challenges. South African olive oil prices are higher than those of imported oils. Coetsee said this was due to the incorrect labelling of internationally manufactured oils as they were not always entirely extra virgin. South Africa follows International Olive Council guidelines in ensuring that the best oils are produced. A large percentage of imported oil that claims to be extra virgin olive oil is not always the real deal. SAO said that testing carried out on two occasions of randomly selected extra virgin olive oil labels showed that up to 60% of the imports were either inferior quality olive oil or adulterated oil, namely containing a blend of seed oils or deodorised oil or pomace oil. SAO added that the European Union subsidised its producers, effectively keeping their nationals in employment. South Africa received the lower quality of European production, but it was often superior in packaging, which often pushed consumers to think that the content in the bottle matched the quality of the label. Wilkinson said the South African producers had applied for a countervailing duty equal and opposite to the European Union subsidy so that the country could compete on price on a level playing field. “We need to educate the consumer into the benefits of using quality extra virgin olive oil as against the poorer quality and fraudulent oils which have questionable health benefits. In the end you get what you pay for.” Location, location, location The first olive trees in South Africa were planted by Jan van Riebeeck, first founder and commander of Cape Town, at his farm Boschenheuvel in the Cape in 1661. Olive farms are still mainly situated in the Western Cape province, because of its climate, which is very similar to that of Mediterranean countries, with cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. There are, however, farms in Gauteng, Northern Cape and Eastern Cape. The Cape Olive Route covers a large area of Western Cape, including the Breede Valley, Paarl region, Stellenbosch and Helderberg, Durbanville and the Overberg region. About 200 olive cultivars are found around the world, with 20 different cultivars grown in South Africa. The average olive tree takes about three to five years to grow to maturity. According to upmarket food and goods retailer Woolworths, the average 750ml bottle sells for about R90. Woolworths offers a wide range of olive oils sourced from a different manufacturers, a number of them in the Western Cape namely: Willow Creek ,In the Nuy Valley, Morgenster, a wine and olive estate in Somerset West, as well as Costas Estate in Paarl, to name a few. Olive oil is good for you The health benefits of olive oil are wide as it is a good source of vitamins A, K and E, which is a powerful antioxidant, as well as of iron, calcium, magnesium and potassium. SAO pointed out that olive oil contained high levels of monounsaturated fatty acids, which maintained the healthiest cholesterol balance. “Extra virgin olive oil is the top grade of olive oil and is produced by mechanical process below 28 degrees and must meet certain chemical criteria with no taste defects,” said Wilkinson. He added that it should contain the highest level of vitamins, antioxidants and polyphenols, which were the underlying attributes for the health benefits of using olive oil in your diet. Olive oil, especially extra virgin, contains tyrosol phenolic compounds such as oleuropein, an antioxidant derived from olive trees, and oleocanthal, a natural organic compound found in extra virgin olive oil. Together with vitamin E, they assist with fighting off cancers, inflammation, coronary artery disease and diabetes, among other ailments, according to Natural News.last_img read more

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How to prepare yourself for an investor: a guide

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first_imgA recent survey found that many South African entrepreneurs needed help with things such as business planning. Find out more about how to prepare yourself for an investor, here.The Real State of Entrepreneurship in South Africa 2017 survey finds that some entrepreneurs do not know where to go for funding. There are various sources of funding, such as angel investors and crowdfunding. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterFunding is one of the challenges faced by many entrepreneurs in South Africa. In the Real State of Entrepreneurship in South Africa 2017 survey, many entrepreneurs indicated that they required education specific to the practicalities of running a business such as marketing support and business planning.According to the Seed Academy, which conducted the survey, there were more than 1,200 respondents this year. In addition, to deepen its insight into the true state of entrepreneurship in South Africa, the survey expanded its scope from start-ups to all entrepreneurs at any stage of business development.It was found that 18% of respondents had attempted to get funding from banks or development funding institutions such as the Industrial Development Corporation or the Department of Trade and Industry.“Some entrepreneurs indicated that they simply didn’t know where to go for funding, especially in light of the fact that most early-stage business funding requirements are below the R100,000 threshold,” said Donna Rachelson, CEO of Seed Engine, which incorporates the Seed Academy and the WDB Seed Fund. This is the third annual survey the Academy has conducted.Here are some learnings to prepare yourself before you approach an investor for funding:The different types of fundingOnline publication Entrepreneur Magazine lists the different forms of funding as angel investment, funding from a bank, crowdfunding, funding for previously disadvantaged individuals, and bootstrapping.Angel investment is when a wealthy professional provides you with start-up capital in exchange for equity in the business or a fixed percentage interest on the loan. Angel investors can be individuals or can be part of an angel network, to distribute risk.Bank funding depends on the different types of loans available and which kind is best suited to your needs. You need to provide a full set of financials and a comprehensive business plan for the bank officials to examine.Crowdfunding is similar to angel investment, but many individuals may pledge different amounts to the business in exchange for equity, interest or other more creative returns. There are South Africans platforms for crowdfunding: startme.co.za, thundafund.com and crowdfunding.co.za. You can also try international crowdfunding platforms such as kickstarter.com, indiegogo.com and rockethub.com.Funding for previously disadvantaged individuals can be in the form of a grant, loan or tender, which is given to previously disadvantaged people who have small businesses.Bootstrapping means starting and growing your business without any external help.Essential elements an investor wantsMarketability, sustainability and the business owner’s passion for the project were the essential elements that would interest an investor, said Gerrie van Biljon, executive director of Business Partners. He told the online business network SME Toolkit South Africa that entrepreneurs should prepare a concise story around their business idea.Van Biljon also advised that the entrepreneur know every detail of their idea and business plan. “Your value proposition should come through succinctly – what are you offering to whom, and why will they be prepared to buy it.”Useful documents for preparing your business planDownload the Industrial Development Corporation’s guidelines on how to prepare a business plan; or download the Seed Academy’s Essential Guide to Funding, or download the Yali Network’s business plan checklist.Experts on what investors wantTafadzwa Madavo, business development manager at Riversands Incubation Hub, told SME South Africa that if entrepreneurs were looking for funding, they should test their ideas first. “They call it a minimal viable product. Don’t look at getting a R1-million for a concept you haven’t even tested.”Robynne Erwin, operations manager of FinFind, agreed with this sentiment. “If you are still at the ideas stage, you need to be aware of the fact that ideas are considered to be cheap. [It] only gets a value when you have taken a step to make it real.”Andrew Louw, CEO of +Louw, advised that the entrepreneur must be able to explain their idea simply and easily in 30 seconds or less. “Focus on the things you can do easily without raising funding. Also, bootstrap as far as you can without needing to raise extra capital.”Watch the three experts give more advice, here:Speaking to the University of Pretoria’s Gordon Institute of Business Science, social entrepreneurs unpacked lessons they had learned when approaching investors.Pat Pillai, founder of Lifeco UnLtd, said the fundraising secret was to always trade for change. “Whether it is an investor, or it is someone who pays you a fee to make sure you grow young entrepreneurs in the most deserving and unprivileged part of our country, there’s always a report back on a return.”Sharanjeet Shan, founder of the Maths Centre, said that clarity and conviction about who you were and what you wanted to do was important. “If you’re not talking from the gut, it’s not going to work.”She added: “Why should I invest money in these people? I’m investing money because somebody’s life is going to change. If one person’s life changes, the lives of their community and the people around them change.”Stacey Brewer, co-founder of the Spark School, said she had learned that you should not change your mission nor your vision based on funding. “Believe in what you are and keep going, keep going.”Gregory Maqoma, founder of the Vuyani Dance Theatre, explained the conversation he had with his funders: “I allow them to understand the vision.“I also allow them to understand where we’re going — we talk about a five-year strategy. So, it’s a long term commitment rather than just focusing on a project. We align ourselves with what is desirable in terms of the space that we are serving.”His company was contributing to a bigger picture. “We can also be in a position where we can say it’s not only serving the community directly affected by the Vuyani Dance Theatre but it’s also about influencing policy; it’s about influencing change on a bigger platform, on a bigger scale.”Watch the video here:Know the term ‘due diligence’?You should educate yourself about due diligence if you are on the hunt for funding for your business, or if you are hoping to work with the government or with bigger companies as a supplier.SME South Africa explained that small and medium enterprises underwent due diligence when an investor evaluated the business as a potential investment opportunity, or a buyer was looking to acquire the enterprise.“Due diligence is a process where a business owner investigates the organisation based on their needs or requirements. The investigation can be legal, financial or anything that the business owner wants to evaluate before they contract themselves,” it reported.Learn more about how “due diligence” works, here.Sources: SME Toolkit South Africa, Entrepreneur Magazine, SME South Africa, Industrial Development Corporation, the YALI Network, and Seed Engine.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Aurangabad vegetable seller ends life after receiving electricity bill for ₹8.65 lakh

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first_imgA vegetable seller in Maharashtra’s Aurangabad district allegedly committed suicide after the Maharashtra State Electricity Board (MSEB) sent him an electricity bill exceeding ₹8 lakh.Jagannath Nehaji Shelke, a resident of Bharatnagar area, took his own life by hanging himself after receiving his bill for the month of April amounting to ₹8,65,020. Police sources said the incident occurred between 4:30 and 5 a.m. on Thursday.Shelke had to pay the bill by May 17. His bill amount, if paid after May 17, read as ₹8,75,830.“The deceased was apparently under severe stress after getting a bill with such figures. He pinned a note to his body saying he was extremely distressed with the humungous electricity bill and hence was forced to take his own life. We are in the process of lodging a complaint,” said an officer from the Garkheda police station, adding that further investigations were on.Mr. Shelke’s kin have demanded that a case be lodged against the Electricity Board for causing his death and have refused to take possession of his body.They further alleged that Shelke had apparently tried to bring this matter to the notice of MSEB authorities, but was ignored by them and asked to pay up by the line man.The MSEB office in Aurangabad said that a clerk had wrongly computed the bill as the vegetable seller had recently installed a new meter. The clerk in question, Sunil Koli, has been suspended for negligence, said sources.last_img read more

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THE UNITARY MODEL- WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR YOUR AFFILIATE?

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first_imgOn 25 June, arguably the most important meeting in the history of the sport will be held. The Special General Meeting will vote on a new constitution that will fundamentally change – for the better – the way the sport is managed and delivered across the country. Let’s assume that the vote is `yes’. What does this mean for the affiliates; for those people actually out there delivering the sport, running competitions? If you’ve been wondering what the answer to this question is, it’s well worth your time to check out the following document… THE UNITARY MODEL- WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR YOUR AFFILIATE?last_img
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a month agoLiverpool star van Dijk: Napoli loss no cause for panic

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first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Liverpool star van Dijk: Napoli loss no cause for panicby Freddie Taylora month agoSend to a friendShare the loveVirgil van Dijk has called for calm after Liverpool’s loss to Napoli in the Champions League.Van Dijk made a rare mistake for Napoli to make it 2-0 through Fernando Llorente in the dying stages of Tuesday’s clash at the San Paolo Stadium.But the Dutchman insists the result will not have a far-reaching impact on the Reds.”I don’t know if it’s a wake-up call,” the defender said of defeat in Naples. “Both sides were full in the game and thought it was going to be a draw. Obviously the penalty changed it all and we’re going home with no points but it shouldn’t be a wake-up call. “We’ve been performing since the start of the season outstanding so there’s no reason for panic. “The majority in the game we played well, we put them under pressure and we created opportunities on the break. “There’s a lot of positive things apart from the result. We have to try to win our other games and we now focus on Chelsea.” last_img read more

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Video: Maryland Beat Wisconsin On Melo Trimble’s 3-Pointer With 1.2 Seconds Remaining

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first_imgMelo Trimble hits game-winning three-pointer as time expires.Melo TrimbleWe just had a Big Ten thriller in Madison. No. 3 Maryland defeated Wisconsin 63-60 on a long three-pointer by point guard Melo Trimble with 1.2 seconds remaining.Trimble’s triple came after Wisconsin’s Bronson Koenig buried a three of a his own to knot the score at 60. Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon elected not to signal for a timeout, instead trusting his All-American point guard to win the game.Good decision.  That shot is the definition of long range. Note ESPN color commentator Dan Dakich saying “Too late” in the background. Dakich thought Trimble took too long before trying to attack.Looks like he knew what he was doing.last_img

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Norden Strengthens Fleet with MR Pair

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first_imgzoomIllustration. Image Courtesy: Pixabay under CC0 Creative Commons license Danish shipping company Norden has purchased two South Korean-built MR product tankers as a way of getting ready for the anticipated market improvement moving forward.The 2009-built vessels, named Nord Magic and Nord Minute, have a deadweight capacity of 50,000 tonnes each. The purchase brings Norden’s tanker fleet to up to 58 vessels including chartered vessels.Out of these 24 tankers are owned by Norden, while the rest are chartered vessels. The vessels are operated through Norient Product Pool (NPP).“While product tanker market conditions have suffered from oversupply and weak demand this year, we expect an improvement towards 2020. Recently, the crude tanker market has recovered strongly, oil price has declined to a 12-month low and oil inventories have been drawn significantly,” CEO Jan Rindbo said in comment.“This points to a recovery in demand for product tankers and improving market conditions. We therefore believe this purchase is a good opportunity to take advantage of the relatively low prices on tonnage now, to increase the capacity.” The two vessels are expected to join Norden’s owned fleet in December 2018. The company’s fleet includes also 12 Handysize vessels and two LR1 tankers on charter.last_img read more

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