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Singer Halsey is pregnant with 1st child

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first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — Halsey has something new to sing about. The pop star announced on Instagram on Wednesday that she is expecting her first child. The 26-year-old posted photos of her baby bump with the caption: “surprise!” A representative for the singer didn’t immediately reply to an email seeking comment or additional information. Halsey has released three platinum albums and is known for hits like “Without Me,” “Bad at Love” and “Closer” with the Chainsmokers.last_img

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Wicked Star Kara Lindsay Is Broadway.com’s Newest Vlogger!

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first_img Lindsay will show us just how magical life is over at the Gershwin Theatre, where she flies around in a bubble, perfects her hair toss and channels Eva Peron eight times a week. Expect frequent cameos from her co-stars, including Caroline Bowman, Matt Shingledecker and Tony nominee Robin de Jesus. Think Pink will kick off on January 22 and run every Thursday for eight weeks. Wicked’s got a new Glinda, and we’re giving her a camera. That’s right: Kara Lindsay is Broadway.com’s newest video blogger! Get ready for your own personality dialysis with Think Pink: Backstage at Wicked with Kara Lindsay. Lindsay previously played Glinda in the national tour of Wicked. She appeared in the original cast of Broadway’s Newsies as Katharine, taking home a Broadway.com Audience Choice Award alongside her co-star Jeremy Jordan. View Commentscenter_img Wicked Related Shows from $95.00last_img read more

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Prisons: The forgotten front in opioid war

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first_imgAnd in the two weeks following their release, former prisoners are 129 times more likely to die from overdose than members of the general population. This is despite the fact that we have robust evidence showing that we can decrease the incidence of relapse, overdose, drug-related health complications like HIV transmission, criminal activity after release and recidivism by offering treatment.And unequivocal data highlights that medication-assisted therapy — that is, treatment with methadone or suboxone — in prisons saves lives. A study published recently in the journal Addiction showed that offering medication-assisted treatment in prisons reduced drug-related overdose deaths by 85 percent in the four-week period following prisoner release and reduced mortality from all causes by 75 percent over the same period.Few other medical interventions have demonstrated such success. Unfortunately, however, the majority of correctional facilities in the United States do not offer programs for people addicted to opioids.Out of the 3,200 U.S. jails, only 23 provide maintenance therapy to inmates. Categories: Editorial, OpinionMultiple leaders across the nation, including Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan and even President Donald Trump, have declared states of emergency in response to the opioid epidemic.Policymakers claim to be battling this public health crisis on all fronts, but one arena continues to be conspicuously ignored: our prisons and jails. Roughly half of all incarcerated individuals suffer from addiction. And if we want to save lives on the streets, we cannot send people out of prisons untreated and abandon them when they are the most vulnerable to overdose.If we’re serious about addressing the opioid epidemic, we have to pay attention to the evidence demonstrating that opioid treatment in jails and prisons is highly effective.And we must act by quickly expanding such treatment to many more facilities around the country. Current programs offering in-facility treatment should guide the nation, serving as examples of how we can provide vulnerable, disenfranchised people with the care they deserve as fellow humans and members of our society.If we claim, whether as a community, a state or a nation, to be fighting the opioid crisis on all fronts, let us not forget one that offers undeniable evidence of a way to save lives. Dr. Justin Berk is a combined internal medicine/pediatrics resident in urban health at Johns Hopkins Hospital.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists This is a critical public health issue, and the benefits of the therapies we can offer to people with opioid addiction who are currently incarcerated reach far beyond those individuals.Our communities benefit too when we help those suffering from addiction get the care they need to survive and live healthy lives. Skeptics will argue against such treatment by asserting that it is too expensive, or that it will be “diverted“ and used inappropriately, or that the people with addictions who end up incarcerated should have taken more personal responsibility.But these interventions have been shown to be cost-effective.Diversion can be minimized, while treatment could actually improve security.And moralizing arguments against a well-recognized psychiatric disorder are antiquated, demonstrating poor knowledge of evidence-based treatment, if not also little compassion for a vulnerable population. I have seen first-hand that suboxone allows many people to concentrate on their lives instead of their addictions upon their release from jail or prison. And out of the 50 state prison systems, only four offer such treatment.This means that people who are fortunate enough to be part of a treatment program before their incarceration are, upon their entrance to a jail or prison, often taken off their medications and forced to endure cruel, painful and dangerous periods of withdrawal. This is not a problem of resources.Many incarcerated patients currently receive appropriate care for other chronic conditions, including diabetes, HIV, cancer and even more-newly-recognized disorders, like gender dysphoria.Our federal and state corrections systems have the capacity to offer this treatment — a treatment defined as “essential medicine“ by the World Health Organization.The inability to access medical treatment with such established benefits is an unacceptable violation of prisoners’ constitutional right to basic health care.But this is not just an issue of rights, and this is not just about prisoners.last_img read more

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Bernd Leno: Arsenal can win a trophy this season

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first_img Loading… Promoted ContentYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Anime11 Most Immersive Game To Play On Your Table Top6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year7 Reasons Why You Might Want To Become A Vegetarian5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its Growth Bernd Leno has not ruled out Arsenal winning a trophy before the end of the season. The Gunners are currently 10th in the Premier League table, 10 points adrift of fourth-placed Chelsea and just seven above the relegation zone. Leno in action However, Mikel Arteta’s side are still in the FA Cup – they will face Portsmouth in the fifth round – and the Europa League. Arsenal reached the final of Europe’s junior competition last term, and will lock horns with Olympiacos in the round of 32 this time around. And despite their mid-table occupancy in the Premier League, Leno believes Arsenal have what it takes to win silverware this term.Advertisementcenter_img “Of course this process takes time but we have to win games,” the goalkeeper said. “In the Europa League and FA Cup we have so many difficult games. We saw last season that in the Europa League quarter-finals and semi-finals you get Champions League teams. “They are all playing for the title and the [Europa League] final was Arsenal against Chelsea, so it was a very, very big game. We want to have this final again and also in the FA Cup. “Everybody told me that the FA Cup final at Wembley is unbelievable with the atmosphere and it is also a trophy, a title and we are looking forward to playing these games. Hopefully, we can win a title this season.” read also; Barcelona defender Samuel Umtiti snubbed Arsenal switch Arsenal, who are currently in Dubai for a warm-weather training trip, face Newcastle in the Premier League next weekend. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

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Alumnus sentenced to six months in prison

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first_imgMacFarlane will also have to serve one year of supervised release, perform 200 hours of community service and pay a fine of $150,000 after paying a total of $450,000 to USC officials to falsely designate both his children as athletic recruits. That November, MacFarlane’s daughter was presented to an admissions subcommittee. She received an official offer of admission in March 2014. In summer 2014, when a USC athletics academic counselor emailed MacFarlane’s daughter asking her to adjust her class schedule to accommodate travel games, Singer instructed MacFarlane to tell the coach that his daughter had plantar fasciitis, a type of foot tissue inflammation, rendering her unable to play. In Fall 2016, MacFarlane began discussing his son’s admission to USC with Singer.  Singer emailed the profile along with the student’s academic information to then-senior associate athletic director Donna Heinel, who presented MacFarlane’s son to an admissions subcommittee, which granted him conditional admission to the University in February 2017 and formal admission a month later. In April, MacFarlane paid Singer $200,000 for helping his son get into the University.  MacFarlane pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud in the Operation Varsity Blues scheme in June. He coordinated with William “Rick” Singer, who organized the backdoor scheme in which wealthy parents paid to have their children falsely designated as athletic recruits to be admitted to top universities. Janke and Khosroshahin have both been charged with conspiracy to commit racketeering and will be sentenced in federal court in January.  In Fall 2013, MacFarlane and Singer arranged for former assistant women’s soccer coach Laura Janke to falsify an athletic profile for MacFarlane’s daughter.  Janke created a fake athletic profile for MacFarlane’s son, featuring a photo of him playing basketball procured by MacFarlane’s wife, who was not charged in the case. The profile listed his height as 6 feet 1 inch, 8 inches taller than his actual height.  In a drafted application essay emailed to MacFarlane, Singer wrote from the point of view of MacFarlane’s daughter, claiming to be a two-sport athlete, “On the soccer or lacrosse field I am the one who looks like a boy amongst girls with my hair tied up, arms sleeveless and blood and bruises from head to toe … It is true that I can be a bit intense out there on the field.”center_img MacFarlane is the 14th defendant and the 13th parent sentenced in the college admissions scandal. His sentencing comes after those of Jeffrey Bizzack, Jane Buckingham and Agustin Huneeus Jr. last month and Devin Sloane in September. MacFarlane’s daughter enrolled at the University in Fall 2014 and graduated in 2018, while his son attended for the 2017-18 academic year but withdrew that May.  MacFarlane’s sentence is lighter than the 15 months in prison, one year of supervised release and $95,000 fine recommended by federal prosecutors. The maximum sentence he could have received for a charge of conspiracy to commit fraud was 20 years in prison with — in most cases — three years of supervised release and a fine worth twice the gross gain or loss resulting from the offense.  USC alumnus Toby MacFarlane was sentenced to six months in prison in Boston federal court Wednesday in the longest prison sentence of the college admissions scandal to date.  That May, MacFarlane paid $200,000 to The Key, one of Singer’s fraudulent foundations that accepted the money, and Singer transferred $100,000 from The Key to a soccer club operated by Janke and former women’s soccer head coach Ali Khosroshahin.  It also stated that he had played varsity basketball for his high school for three years. While MacFarlane’s son did play varsity basketball, he had only done so his senior year. Her daughter’s USC application falsely stated that she had been a “U.S. Club Soccer All American” player sophomore through senior year of high school. last_img read more

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