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Indonesia aims to double gas production by 2030 with major projects in pipeline

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first_imgIndonesia is aiming to double gas production over the next 10 years to 12,300 million cubic feet per day (mmscfd) as it sets sights on becoming one of the top global gas exporters with major projects in the pipeline.The government’s Upstream Oil and Gas Regulatory Special Task Force (SKK Migas) said in a statement on March 4 that two developments last year “added optimism” to Indonesia’s goal of becoming a leading gas producer. He was referring to the resumption of a stalled gas project at the offshore Masela Block and the discovery of a giant gas reserve at the Sakakemang Block in South Sumatra. However, major oil and gas players told The Jakarta Post that SKKMigas was still in talks with stakeholders over how to achieve the target. Topics : SKKMigas itself has an ambitious oil production target of 1 million barrels per day (bpd) by 2030. The target, which is 1.3 times bigger than last year’s production rate of 746,000 bpd, harks back to the Indonesian oil and gas industry’s golden age in the 1980s, when oil production was above 1 million bpd and the country was a member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC).In comparison to the SKKMigas target, the General National Energy Planning road map – the regulatory guide for Indonesia’s energy transition – projects oil and gas production rates to reach a much lower 667 bpd and 5,808 mmscfd respectively by 2030. Last year’s production rates were higher than the two figures.Furthermore, Energy and Mineral Resources Ministry data shows that oil and gas investments to Indonesia last year fell 7 percent short of the US$13.4 billion annual target.Nevertheless, Indonesia is developing two new LNG facilities that will enable higher LNG exports. Aside from Inpex’s Masela plant, British Petroleum (BP) is developing the Tangguh Train 3 in West Papua, which is expected to produce 3.8 million tons of LNG each year. The two facilities would double Indonesia’s LNG production capacity to 33.1 million tons each year by 2027.SKKMigas noted that, of the total 2,025 billion British thermal (Bbtu) units of LNG piped in Indonesia last year, 508 Bbtu was sold domestically and 1,417 Bbtu was exported, mostly to China, Japan, South Korea, Thailand and Taiwan. “Asia is expected to remain the dominant region [for long-term LNG demand] in the decades to come, with South and Southeast Asia generating more than half of the increased demand,” Dutch energy giant Shell wrote in its latest LNG Outlook report. In May 2019, Indonesia concluded an 18-year negotiation with Japan’s Inpex Corp over developing a liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant in Masela, which will produce 9.5 million tons of LNG each year. Four months later, Spain’s Repsol announced the discovery of an estimated 2 trillion cubic feet (tcf) gas reserve in Sakakemang – the third-largest discovery in the Asia-Pacific last year.SKKMigas head Dwi Soetjipto said in the statement that the gas would be used “to improve the competitiveness of domestic industries and to create an opportunity for Indonesia to once again become a leading LNG supplier to the world”.Read also: Oil and gas players dedicate 2019 for the long-haul Boosting domestic gas production and exports is one of Indonesia’s many strategies to turn around the country’s gaping oil and gas trade deficit that remains a key vulnerability. The deficit reached $1.18 billion in January, up 2.8 times from the previous year, Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data show.“The vision of 12,300 mmscfd by 2030 is a challenging one, and it will require considerable effort, collaboration and investment on the part of the industry and the government to achieve this,” said Gary Selbie, country manager for Premier Oil Indonesia, the country’s seventh-largest gas producer last year, on March 6.He said industry stakeholders had conducted preliminary discussions on meeting the goal. They also planned several meetups in the coming months to create a detailed road map to help achieve the target.Indonesian Petroleum Association (IPA) executive director Marjolijn “Meity” Wajong told the Post on March 7 that SKKMigas had not yet engaged with the IPA over the plan but that it would do so in the near future.“Basically, we welcome the plan to increase production as long as we can figure out how to ensure good project economics,” she said.Read also: Indonesia projects lower oil and gas production amid low investmentlast_img read more

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Zimbabwe to seek extradition of Palmer

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first_imgZIMBABWE POWER TRANSITION Related Nigerian farmers seek more incentives TALK AFRICA: Zimbabwe Looks East South Africa has been struggling to contain a record surge in rhino poaching, and poachers have slaughtered tens of thousands of elephants annually for their ivory around Africa in recent years. Fears are now emerging that the United States department of justice may decline Zimbabwe’s request for the extradition of the American man behind the killing of Cecil the lion.Legal experts have cautioned that legal technicalities and international perceptions on the record of Zimbabwe’s justice system, may just help Walter Palmer get away with what some have termed an open and shut poaching case.last_img

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Premier League clubs to resume training from today

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first_imgBy Simon EvansMANCHESTER, England (Reuters) – Premier League clubs will return to training on Tuesday after agreeing to allow “small group” sessions to begin, with a possible return to normal ‘contact’ training next week.The league held a conference call for all 20 clubs on Monday where the move was given unanimous backing but there remains no firm date for the season to resume.Another meeting is scheduled for early next week when the league will decide on whether to move to the second phase which allows for training involving contact.It is the first move in the league’s ‘Project Restart’ plans to resume play in the league, which has not held a game since March 9 due to the novel coronavirus pandemic.The league has set June 12 as a tentative date for a restart of action but chief executive Richard Masters said they were aware they would need to be flexible.“We have been focused on this staging post, it’s not a firm commitment, for June 12. What we are able to do today is basically to move forward on small group training,” Masters told reporters on a conference call.“Next week we are going to be discussing full contact training protocols.“Once you know when you can start full contact training, and we’ve had a proper discussion with clubs about how much is required to create the fitness levels before they can start playing, we are then in a position to be able to confirm when the season start is.“What we don’t want to do is continually move that start date so we haven’t changed it. We need to be flexible and acknowledge we are in a step-by-step process,” he added.Failure to resume the season could cost the league around 750 million pounds ($913.80 million) in lost revenue from broadcasters according to British media estimates.Some reports said clubs could lose out even if the league restarts should broadcasters demand a 330 million pounds rebate.DOOR OPEN The Government last week opened the door for the return of elite sport, but several hurdles remain before the Premier League can resume behind closed doors with the aim of completing the remaining 92 matches of the season.Some players have expressed concern about the health risks involved in a return to play but Masters said the league had done its best to create a safe environment through consulting with government and health experts.“Clearly we cannot de-risk the entire thing. But I think what we have created is an extremely safe environment that is the first stage of a return to training. So hopefully we have reassured all players and managers on that basis,” he said, adding there would be further consultations ahead of each stage.Some managers, such as Newcastle United’s Steve Bruce, have expressed concern about whether there will be enough time for players to get match-fit before the league resumes.Mark Gillett, the Premier League’s medical advisor, said they were aware of the need for preparation time.“Safety is the key thing running through all the measures we’re putting in place. I spend a lot of my time in club football, so I do understand the need for football-specific training,” he said.“We will do everything possible to try and ensure that clubs get enough time to try and prepare in the best way possible, to keep them safe during games.”Clubs will have been encouraged by the return of the Bundesliga at the weekend — the first major soccer league in the world to resume after the lockdown.The prospect of clubs playing their remaining matches at neutral venues has receded with more than half speaking out against such a proposal.Safety measures for group training are expected to include tents where temperature checks will be conducted, strict hygiene criteria, no canteens and no showers. A maximum of five players will be allowed per pitch with tackling forbidden.Players will be tested twice a week and are being asked to provide written approval that they have received and understood the club’s COVID-19 policy.last_img read more

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Alumna Catherine Shieh advocates for political engagement

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first_imgNestled in the heart of the Silicon Valley, Monta Vista High School in Cupertino is notorious for being one of the most academically intense in the state. With Apple’s headquarters just a stone’s throw away and many of the residents employed in the technology industry, Monta Vista has an undeniable emphasis on math and science. Within this high-tech world, USC alumna Catherine Shieh found her true calling: politics.“I just clearly didn’t fit the math and science mold, and I had other strengths besides every other Monta Vista student,” Shieh said.Her sister suggested joining Vision New America, a program that focuses on increasing civic engagement among underrepresented youth by placing high school students into state legislative offices. Shieh was placed in the office of then-State Assemblymember Joe Coto (D-District 23).“I realized that politics isn’t that bad.There are a lot of good people, [for example] staffers and other names that you don’t hear, and these are people who truly do want to figure out what is best for everybody,” Shieh said. “Politics is so tricky because you technically shouldn’t be excluding anybody, and I think that’s so fascinating. To realize that good intentions can go somewhere in politics was inspiring, and I realized this is where I’m meant to be.”Shieh continued her political involvement at USC. She began as a student worker for the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics, which she said “got [her] foot in the door.” In addition to serving as finance director and president of the USC College Democrats, she went on to intern for the campaign finance firm Maravich Associates LLC, as well as a several campaigns — including current Congresswoman Janice Hahn’s congressional campaign, Senator Dianne Feinstein’s re-election campaign and current State Assemblymember Sebastian Ridley-Thomas’ campaign. She also interned for the nonprofit California Forward and for Congressman Mike Honda.Shieh focused on civil rights and Asian-American issues while working for Honda. She also helped open the Congressional Anti-Bullying Caucus, which launched in June 2012 and focuses on preventing bullying in educational institutions and other establishments. Shieh said the political culture of USC did not concern her as much as political culture in general, especially the lack of engagement among minorities, particularly Asian Americans.“Asian Americans, at the end of the day, are the least likely to vote, the least likely to get health insurance, the least likely to be civically engaged, the least likely to be anywhere in politics,” Shieh said. “The fact that, among my peers, I will be the only Asian American, let alone the only Asian-American female, they’ll encounter, I knew very early on I was not going to be like everyone else.”After graduating in December 2013, Shieh moved to Washington D.C. to intern for Congressman Ami Bera of California’s 7th Congressional District. She continued her work on Asian-American issues as well as pharmaceutical drug regulations. Drawing on her experience working for Honda, she was asked to help create the California Public Higher Education Caucus for Bera. Shieh said that following the passage of Proposition 13 in 1978, the University of California and California State University schools have become more dependent on the federal government for funding. The caucus will advocate for the two state university systems and focus on improving quality, affordability and accessibility of higher education. “America depends on California, California needs to advocate for itself,” Shieh said. Shieh emphasized the importance of civic engagement and political involvement for students.“If you don’t vote, don’t complain because that’s no longer your place,” Shieh said. “We forget that people fought and died to make sure that we can vote. Those who identify as undocumented, they would willingly do anything for their voice to be heard and their voice legally cannot be heard. Voting is your first responsibility, and there are 11 million undocumented Americans who don’t have that luxury.”According to Shieh, the most pernicious force in politics is not bad intentions, but apathy. “I don’t think there are a lot of ‘bad people’ who are in politics,” Shieh said. “I think there’s just enough people that are willing to opt out of politics, which means they are OK with what’s happening, and when you have enough people that are OK with the status quo that makes things the way they are, and that make it stay and that makes that power stay and it’s more apathy that will hurt us than people with mal intentions.”She advised students interested in politics to remember the power of asking for what they want. “Always advocate for yourself, and always ask,” Shieh said. “You never know who’s going to be your friend at the end of the day, and especially trying to get people of color to be involved, it’s always on the individual to ask for more resources, always ask for that business card, always ask to meet up a second time, always ask for that email, always ask for an opportunity because all that takes is an ask. I know that I would clearly not be where I am today if I didn’t have a boss who told me, ‘You always have to ask.’”last_img read more

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