爱上海,上海龙凤419,上海419论坛 – Powered by Coral Miller!

Pigweed pollen

Posted on by

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of GeorgiaSpringtime tree pollen covers much of Georgia now. Lynn Sosnoskie plans to track a different kind of pollen this summer, one that has the potential to spread the worst thing to hit Georgia cotton in decades.Sosnoskie, a post doctoral research associate with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will run experiments in cotton fields, greenhouses and laboratories to learn more about the pollen released by Palmar amaranth, a nasty plant commonly called pigweed. She wants to know how much pollen a pigweed plant produces, when it produces it, what it looks like, how far the pollen flies, how long it is viable and how weather affects it. The cotton industry wants answers because inside some of those tiny pollen grains is a genetic trait that could force Georgia farmers to change the way they grow cotton, or force them to stop growing it.“There isn’t much literature out there on anything like this. We’re pretty much making it as we go,” she said.Farmers in some areas can no longer kill pigweed with glyphosate, a popular herbicide sold under the brand name Roundup. It’s the one weed they didn’t want to develop resistance to glyphosate. It can grow several inches per day and be the size of a small tree in a few months. It steals nutrients away from cotton plants and can clog cotton harvesters. In 1997, farmers started planting cotton that was developed to stay healthy when sprayed with Roundup. They could spray the herbicide over the top of this cotton, killing weeds but not the cotton. Virtually all Georgia cotton grown now is “Roundup Ready” because it saves farmers time and money.In 2004, rumors of resistant weeds started popping up. In 2005, it was confirmed: Georgia was the first place in the world to have glyphosate-resistant pigweed. Since then, it has been confirmed in 18 south-central Georgia counties. North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Arkansas have confirmed it, too.Palmar amaranth pollen is dimpled much like a golf ball, which is designed to travel long distances, Sosnoskie said.“Because Palmar amaranth is wind pollinated,” she said, “this trait has the potential to spread beyond a single farm or county. It’s not just one person’s problem. It’s everyone’s problem.”Sosnoskie will take the information she collects (she already has two-year’s worth) and make mathematical models. The models can be used to show problem spots. Models can also show where it could spread and how. The Georgia cotton industry must catch up and try to stay ahead of this growing issue, said Stanley Culpepper, a CAES weed specialist. He has compared the pigweed problem to the boll weevil. That little pest crippled cotton production in the Southeast in the mid-1900s. It continued to be a problem until a multimillion-dollar eradication program started in 1987 stopped the pest in 1994. “This issue is not going away,” Culpepper said. “This research will be a key in helping get answers and provide growers and the industry ways to control its spread.”last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

More Gains for the NPFL as La Liga Partnership Yields Early…

Posted on by

first_imgThe recently-signed partnership between the Nigerian Professional Football League and the Spanish La Liga is beginning to yield gains just a couple of months after both parties sealed the landmark deal in Abuja. The Spanish League Association Foundation has already voted 54,000 euros, as well as sporting materials, including training shirts, official balls and other equipment, to El Kanemi Warriors in a bid to help assuage the problems faced by the Borno State club as a result of the Boko Haram insurgency. Also an All-Star team of the NPFL will head to the European nation in August where they will played friendly games with top-flight outfits Malaga and Valencia. The matches, which will be beamed live, will help to further promote the Nigerian league and open new opportunities abroad for our players.One fully expects that more encouraging yields will be coming through from this partnership and this would no doubt enhance the marketability our players, clubs and league. In the ultracompetitive world we live in today a country like Nigeria with a population size of 180m, lots of oil and an abundance of mineral resources, should be an irresistibly beautiful bride, if we know how to apply our make-up properly. I have often maintained that if we get our act together, the money to run football and other sports would come in from overseas. This La Liga deal shows that if we keep our standards, the big players in the global sports industry will be keen to get a piece of the action, which then translate to foreign direct investments, jobs for Nigerians, and more wealth, peace and unity in society.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .

Segun Toriola: Heading for 7th Olympics with Hope

Posted on by

first_imgAccording to Toriola, he never went to any table tennis club or stadium, but simply developed his skills in his father house. It was therefore not surprising that scouts were quick to recognise the potentials in him while playing local competitions in Abeokuta.“I was discovered in Abeokuta. I was about the only junior player in the state then that was doing very well. From then on, I was invited to participate in tournaments across the country after which I started representing my state in national competitions and that was how I came to the limelight,” the Olumo High School, Abeokuta,  graduate recalled.But it was not until after the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona that Toriola decided to turn professional. “By 1992, I had become one the best players in the country and I realised that if I needed to improve my game or want to become a professional player, which had always been my dream I had to go abroad where there are better opportunities, exposure to better facilities and coaching. So, I left for Italy to pursue my dream,” he said.Since then, he has not looked back. He has represented Nigeria at every level – the All African Games, Commonwealth Games and the Olympics.On how he feels going for his seventh Olympics, a feat no African athlete had achieved, he said: “I feel so happy to be the first African to achieve such a feat and it was something I never dream of. It was really unexpected. When I participated in my first Olympics in Barcelona in 1992, I did not expect that I would still be playing up till now, because it was a very long way.Toriola now joins table tennis legends, Jean-Michel Saive of Belgium, Jorgen Persson of Sweden and Zoran Primorac of Croatia in an elite group of players who have played at seven Olympic Games.Asked whether the inability of the Nigeria Table Tennis Federation (NTTF) to focus on the development of young players that could have taken over from him that was responsible for his being around up till now, Toriola said,  “Nigeria is really improving in table tennis. For instance Aruna Quadri is one of the best in the world today. Bode Abiodun and Sheyi Ojo are also doing very well. There are many upcoming players in the country that are doing very good but what has kept me going is hard work. People always say that I have been around for so long but they don’t know how hard I work. It is my hard work that is giving me the edge and not that the upcoming once are not improving.”He however admitted that the Rio Olympics would be his last in the world’s biggest sporting fiesta. “This would definitely be my last Olympics because its time I needed to start supporting the young ones and also see to the discovery of another great table tennis player for Nigeria.”Since the country has been participating in the Olympics no table tennis player has stood on the podium to collect a medal of any colour, but Toriola believes the tide may change this time around, especially with the new rules in place in which every country represented now have equal advantage in numbers of representation. “The chances of Nigeria table tennis team winning a medal are 50-50. With the new system in place, whereby every country have equal representation, we stand a good chance of taking something back, unlike in the past whereby the Chinese would be represented by about five or more players. Though, the Chinese still have the edge over other countries because they are still the best,” the four-time All-African Games champion admitted.The captain of the table tennis team to the Rio Olympic in Brazil, however believes the team would not be under pressure to perform at the games.“It is very important that we put up a good performance and make the country proud at the Olympics. We are preparing ourselves very well and hopefully, we will have something to celebrate in Rio.“Quadri is an experienced player and he is the best in Africa for now based of his achievement but I don’t think that he will be under unnecessary pressure in Rio because he is not going to be thinking about the games. It is only when an athlete thinks like that, that he put himself under unnecessary pressure. As a team, we will not be playing under pressure too as we want to go out there and make names for ourselves and the country,” he said.The NTTF President, Wahid Oshodi also believes the players are gearing up to do well in Brazil: “Our preparation could be a lot better but we all know the problem that is facing sports today. The players have been doing their best to keep in shape and working very hard before the tournament kicks off. We are hopeful and confident that these players will do us proud,” Oshodi said. Toriola was born in September 1974 and he is the youngest of nine brothers. He has been amongst the top table tennis players in Africa since the mid-1990s. Ranked number 1 in Africa from 1998 to June 2008.He is renowned for his unusual style of forehand play, which makes him an awkward opponent for many. Despite lacking good footwork, he has an excellent topspin, which has allowed him to pull off many upsets with top world players.His biggest achievement at the Olympics was reaching the men’s singles 1/16 final at the 2008 Olympics in Beijing. His 1/32 match-up with Jean-Michel Saive was seen by many as one of the highlights of the men’s singles tournament.His fifth Olympic appearance in 2008 made him the first Nigerian to appear at five Olympics. This feat was achieved four years earlier by Mary Onyali and also in 2008 by fellow table tennis player, Bose Kaffo. By the end of the 2008 Summer Olympics, only thirteen table tennis players worldwide had appeared at least five Olympics. With his participation in 2012 Olympics in London, he became the only Nigerian athlete to appear at six Olympics, and one of the three African to do so.During his career, he has won multiple medals in international singles tournaments.Nigeria would be represented in Rio by the trio of Toriola, Aruna Quadri and Bode Abiodun. Toriola and Quadri would be participating in the singles events while Abiodun would join in the team event, while Funke Oshinaike in the only female player that will represent the country in the women’s singles.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Though Sports Minister, Solomon Dalung has set a target of 10 gold medals for Nigeria at the Rio Olympics, but aside few optimists, not many are counting on the country to do well at the world’s biggest sporting fiesta considering shabby preparations and the quality of athletes. However, when the competition starts on August 5, a Nigerian would be setting a record. Segun Toriola would be the first and only African to have appeared seven times at the global show-piece. In this report, Kunle Adewale, captures Toriola’s mood ahead of the eventIf Segun Toriola had not taken to table tennis, it would have been a big surprise. The game runs in the family as all his older siblings played the game that is generally believed to be China’s biggest export to the world of sports. Indeed, Segun’s father adored the game a lot, so much so that he gave out a whole floor of his house for it.“Table tennis runs in my family. All my brothers played table tennis and some of them even played for Nigeria before me. My father loves table tennis a lot. He bought table boards and installed them in a big building in our family house in Lafenwa area of Abeokuta, Ogun State. Here, we all played the game. He allowed us to make use of the entire third floor of the building for table tennis,” Toriola said.last_img read more

Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , .