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13 hours agoRaul insists Wolves aiming for Europa League knockout round

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first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say Raul insists Wolves aiming for Europa League knockout roundby Freddie Taylor13 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveRaul Jimenez says Wolves are fighting to reach the Europa League knockout stages.The Molineux outfit recorded a brave 2-1 away win over Slovan Bratislava on Thursday, with Jimenez scoring the decisive penalty.He told BT Sport: “For me it’s always in my mind that I’m going to score. It’s my style of shooting penalty kicks, I’m never going to change. I had a lot of confidence and it was a good moment to score the second goal, we’re in the fight now.”We came here knowing that if we won the game it would be better for us, we’re fighting to go into the next round now.” last_img read more

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Oklahoma State Honoring Members Of Basketball Program Who Died In Plane Crash 14 Years Ago Today

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first_imgOklahoma State honors 2001 plane crash victims.On January 27th, 2001, the Oklahoma State basketball program suffered an unthinkable tragedy when eight members of its family (two players and six staffers and broadcasters) died in a plane crash while returning from a game in Colorado. In the years since that traumatic event, the 10 people who died in the crash –including the pilot and co-pilot–have been memorialized with a banner hanging in the rafters of OSU’s home court, Gallagher-Iba Arena, and a memorial located inside the Athletics Center. Also, each year, at the home game closest to the date of the crash, Oklahoma State honors the 10. This post from the Cowboys’ official athletics Instagram account has all the details on the ceremony before tonight’s game against Baylor: Very touching and appropriate tribute for those whose lives were inexplicably cut short, and it’s incredible to think 14 years has passed since this tragedy happened.last_img read more

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JAMPRO Taking Steps to Improve Investment Facilitation

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first_img The Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO) has been coordinating various initiatives to improve efficiency and effectiveness in facilitating investment projects and activities.Addressing a JIS Think Tank on June 26, President of JAMPRO, Diane Edwards, said that the entity has reviewed its three-year development plan and established new strategies to build global partnerships and transform the business environment.“We are in the process of transforming the business environment and getting to top 10 in the Doing Business Report, and this will mean that persons will be able to transact all their business online with the Government as a result of the improvements that will take place,” Ms. Edwards said.She explained that the transformation will enable persons to pay taxes and start a business online, apply for all their business approvals, and apply for and track their applications for building permits through the Application Management and Data Automation (AMANDA) system.AMANDA aims to improve the ease of doing business with municipal corporations and key government agencies.“Business interests will also be able to look at an investment map of Jamaica and see where the investment opportunities are… [and] the specific public-sector facilities that they need to be close to,” Ms. Edwards noted further.“They can look at where all the ports are… so the whole question of the transformation of the business environment means that every Jamaican business will find it easier to do business,” she added.Another major thrust to improve operations is the establishment of a national investment policy, which will serve as a pivotal blueprint through which the Government will attract and facilitate investments.“There are many different ministries, agencies and departments that impact investment, but we see the need to bring together all the agencies of government in a cohesive attempt to attract inward investment and to ease the doing business flow. So what we want is for everybody to be joined up and understand their role in the process,” Ms. Edwards pointed out.As it relates to global partnerships, she noted that JAMPRO has been facilitating several marketing activities and engagements towards this thrust.She explained that the idea is to build international collaborations through trade shows, conferences and international missions to reach particular investors for specific investment projects.“Our intention is to leverage the potential of our 23 service offices internationally and also to work with honorary councils overseas in very deliberate partnerships to get them to expand our network and outreach capability in the international market,” Ms. Edwards said. “We are in the process of transforming the business environment and getting to top 10 in the Doing Business Report, and this will mean that persons will be able to transact all their business online with the Government as a result of the improvements that will take place,” Ms. Edwards said. The Jamaica Promotions Corporation (JAMPRO) has been coordinating various initiatives to improve efficiency and effectiveness in facilitating investment projects and activities. Addressing a JIS Think Tank on June 26, President of JAMPRO, Diane Edwards, said that the entity has reviewed its three-year development plan and established new strategies to build global partnerships and transform the business environment. Story Highlightslast_img read more

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The European Coalition for Cultural Diversity have

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first_imgThe European Coalition for Cultural Diversity have called for a renewed effort by Europe to create a financial system of cultural support that meets the needs of the digital era.The group has organised a conference at the European Parliament in Brussels with the support of deputy Pervenche Bérès to push for the ending of a financial regime that it sees as penalising cultural production and benefiting large multinational corporations.The coalition has called for cultural goods sold via digital distribution platforms to benefit from the same tax breaks afforded to other cultural goods, and praised European countries that have levied VAT on digital books at the same rate as physical books as setting a good example.The group also called for an overhaul of taxes applied to cultural goods at a European level to prevent international groups avoiding their responsibilities, including the responsibility to support domestic cultural production.last_img read more

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Thalamus controls development of normal sleep and waking states study finds

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 12 2018Consciousness requires continuous, internally generated activity in the brain. The modulation of this activity is the basis of the electroencephalogram (EEG) and of generation of sleep, dreams, and perception. Achieving such activity is thus an important milestone in normal brain maturation, which occurs around birth. Successful transition to this activity indicates a good prognosis for babies born prematurely and/or suffering from damage to the brain.To be functional as a dreaming, seeing, and thinking entity the brain need to achieve two milestones: continuity, which means that the brain is always active and state dependence, meaning brain activity is modulated by sleep, waking, and attention. The circuit mechanisms behind the development of continuity and state dependence in the brain have remained unknown, but have been widely assumed to be located in the cerebral cortex, the convoluted brain structure responsible for thought and perception.A team from the George Washington University (GW) has published a study in the Journal of Neuroscience suggesting instead that the thalamus, a tiny nucleus deep in the brain, actually controls the development of state dependence and continuity.”Our results indicate that cellular changes in the thalamus relay function may be critical drivers for the maturation of background activity,” Matthew Colonnese, PhD, associate professor of pharmacology and physiology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, said. “Humans undergo developmental transitions in brain activity before and near birth.”Related StoriesResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingDrawing on previous work by Colonnese, his team used advanced techniques to record simultaneously from multiple brain regions to pinpoint the circuit change responsible for the acquisition of continuity and state dependence measured in the sensory cortex. They were surprised to learn that activity changes in the thalamus, rather than the local cortical circuitry or the interconnectivity of two structures, can explain most of these critical developmental milestones.”From a clinical perspective, certain things can go wrong in birth, like hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy, brain injury caused by lack of oxygen to the brain, and the brain can revert to a state of discontinuity or never develop continuity,” said Colonnese. “These findings could help us understand the circuit basis of human EEG development to improve diagnosis and treatment of infants in vulnerable situations. By putting the development of the EEG on a mechanistic basis we hope to increase its utility in the clinic.”Colonnese and his team, which includes Yasunobu Murata, PhD, a research scientist in Colonnese’s lab at GW and co-author of the study, are working to develop a comprehensive atlas of EEG patterns and brain lesions that cause them to aid in this process.Now that they have established the thalamus is in control, he said, the next step is to further define what circuit changes occur in brain development so clinicians can pinpoint from an EEG what’s gone wrong in cases like hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.Source: https://smhs.gwu.edu/news/new-study-finds-thalamus-wakes-brain-during-developmentlast_img read more

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Microgel powder reduces infection and promotes healing

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first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 14 2018While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99 percent.Hao Meng’s doctoral project focused on biocompatibility testing and pulling a sticky amino acid out of mussels. Glue-like catechol shows promise for smart adhesives — a small jolt of electricity can turn the stickiness on and off — but that’s not its only potential use.”In the process, Meng discovered the chemical reaction generated hydrogen peroxide as a byproduct of oxidation,” says Bruce Lee, associate professor of biomedical engineering and Meng’s PhD advisor at Michigan Technological University. “She started thinking, what if we could use the hydrogen peroxide?”The answer is yes, and the technology that makes this portable, healing disinfectant possible is the subject of a new paper published in Acta Biomaterialia. The work brought together an interdisciplinary team of engineers to explore not only the tech development but also the material’s physical and biological properties. The coauthors include Caryn Heldt, James and Lorna Mack Chair in Bioengineering, and Megan Frost, interim chair of the Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology as well as an associate professor of biomedical engineering and an affiliated associate professor of materials science and engineering.Just like Jello After Meng first observed that her reactions created hydrogen peroxide, she started considering the best form to put the byproduct in. She wanted lots of surface area to power the chemical reaction and she wanted a way to reuse the material. So, the team made a microgel.”The gel is just like jello,” Lee says. “It’s a polymer network with a lot of water in it. And just like jello, we start with a liquid and solidify it into a shape.”Microgels are like tiny bubbles of jello. To the naked eye, the dry form is a nondescript powder. Suspend it in a solution with neutral or a slightly alkaline pH, such as distilled water or a saline solution like contact lens cleaner, and the hydrogen peroxide cycle gets rolling. Left to its own devices, the micron-sized microgels generated between one to five millimolars over four days. Once the microgel powder is dried again, the material basically resets, sits safely contained in a small bag, and can be reused. It’s like an on-demand bottle of disinfectant — without the bulky bottle and hazardous storage issues.Antimicrobial and AntiviralRelated StoriesNew research could help design algae that produces fuels and cleanup chemicalsNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerAlternate cell growth pathway could open door to new treatments for metastatic cancersThe inspiration for that iconic brown bottle in the medicine cabinet didn’t start in a lab; the body naturally produces hydrogen peroxide to help heal cuts and the substance has been widely used medicinally to kill off bacteria and even viruses. Because the microgel powder continues to create and release hydrogen peroxide, its potency remains high, especially compared to the old-school cotton ball technique.The team studied the microgel’s effects on two common bacterial strains and two structurally different viruses. That includes the thin-walled and gram-positive Staphylococcus epidermidis, as well as the more impenetrable and gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli). They also looked at the extremely resistant non-enveloped porcine parovirus (PPV) and easier to inactivate enveloped bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV). Because of the hard protein casing around PPV, which makes it and other non-enveloped viruses more resistant to biocides, the team was pleasantly surprised to see that the microgel still reduced the virus’ ability to infect cells by 99.9 percent. (In technical terms, that’s a three log reduction value of infectivity.) With BVDV, they observed a 99.999 percent reduction in infectivity.From Camping to BattlefieldsThe possibilities are almost endless. Wherever a small bag can go, so could this technology. Whether it’s backcountry travel, space stations, remote clinics or war zones, a little bit of healing to prevent infection can go a long way. While Lee and his team say the tech is not quite ready for Amazon Prime, they are hopeful that the work shows promise for a variety of applications, perhaps even with antibiotic resistance.”We haven’t tested any antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains yet, but the more we can get away from using antibiotics in the first place, the better,” Lee says. “There’s still a lot of work to be done. We want to demonstrate under what conditions it promotes healing and how a cell responds to it. Hydrogen peroxide at high concentrations can also kill cells, so we need to have a balance that changes for different cell types.”Lee recently received funding from the Department of Defense Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health through the Defense Medical Research and Development Program to continue this line of research. What started with a sticky protein’s waste will be refined into a lightweight, portable and recyclable microgel powder with enough oomph to kick even the most stubborn bacterial and viral infections. Source:https://www.mtu.edu/news/stories/2018/november/microgel-powder-fights-infection-and-helps-wounds-heal.htmllast_img read more

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New therapy for childhood blindness shows very promising results

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Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Dec 18 2018A new therapy aimed at improving the sight of people with one of the most common forms of childhood blindness, has shown ‘very promising’ initial results, according to a study involving UCL researchers.As part of a clinical trial, ten patients with Leber congenital amaurosis type 10 (LCA10), had one of their eyes injected with a therapeutic molecule, known as QR-110, with the other eye left untreated, providing a base for comparison.The patients were injected at regular intervals, and the results, published in Nature Medicine, showed QR-110, had no adverse effects and vision had improved in patients at three months.One patient responded exceptionally well and after six weeks of treatment self-reported substantial visual improvements and, for the first time in decades, was able to see lights with increasing clarity and brightness – but only in the treated eye. At four months the patient was able to read the first three lines of the standard ETDRS eye test, showing the visual acuity (clarity of vision) has improved from light perception to 20/400 vision.The clinical trial was undertaken by study collaborators at the University of Pennsylvania, University of Iowa and University of Ghent.Co-author Professor Mike Cheetham (UCL Institute of Ophthalmology) led the pre-clinical research and worked with scientists from ProQR Therapeutics, Netherlands, to develop the QR-110 treatment.”Our work on helping to develop QR-110, used patient stem cells to make a ‘retina in a dish’ to show QR-110 could potentially work for this devastating early onset blindness,” he said.”It is really exciting to see the treatment in clinical trial and initial results are very promising, showing some real benefit to patients. It seems to be safe and is improving the vision of these severely visually impaired patients.”Hopefully the patients will continue to improve and more patients can be treated in the near future.”LCA10 is a severe, early-onset inherited retinal disease associated with changes in the gene CEP290. This gene provides the instructions for building a protein that is essential for the formation and stability of the light sensitive outer segment of photoreceptor cells. One specific mutation is the single most common cause of LCA and is found in 60-90% of people with LCA10. This results in incorrect editing and interpretation of the genetic code during protein construction, so that retinal cells end up with a significantly reduced amount of normal, fully functional CEP290 protein.Related StoriesLong-term statin use linked to lower risk of glaucomaSmartphone-based telemedical DR screening could improve ophthalmic careFACS-based CRISPR screening shows how Chlamydia bacterium invades host cellsThe pre-trial research team, led by Professor Cheetham, developed proof of concept that molecules, called antisense oligonucleotides, could silence the effect of this mutation so that the gene splicing machinery can make the correct protein. They then worked with ProQR to develop a clinically applicable antisense oligonucleotide and found that the molecule QR-110 was most effective at achieving this and was able to restore levels of normal CEP290 protein in cells from individuals with LCA10. This was possible by using a ‘retina in a dish’ model made from LCA10 patient stem cells, and the results showed improved photoreceptor structure. QR-110 was also very specific in targeting the mutation without influencing other parts of the genome (genetic code).The researchers established that QR-110 was well tolerated in animal models, and reached all layers of the retina, lasting a suitable length of time in the eye, making it a promising candidate for clinical testing. This work led to the human clinical trials now being reported on.Professor Cheetham added: “I think this opens up the possibility of treating many forms of inherited blindness with drugs similar in design to QR-110, small antisense oligonucleotides that are specifically to correct genetic faults.”Director of Research, Dr Neil Ebenezer from Fight for Sight, who provided some of the funding for the preclinical work, said: “We helped to fund the initial research that proved this genetic technique could work in the lab, and it was this groundwork that led to the clinical trial. It is fantastic that the clinical trial is now bringing us one step closer to having an effective treatment for patients with Leber congenital amaurosis.” Source:https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ read more

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NIHfunded researchers develop new assay to measure success of HIV cure strategies

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 31 2019Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a new assay to accurately and easily count the cells that comprise the HIV reservoir, the stubborn obstacle to an HIV cure. This advance will enable researchers who are trying to eliminate the HIV reservoir to clearly understand whether their strategies are working. The research was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH.The HIV reservoir consists of infected cells containing DNA molecules that encode HIV proteins. These cells have entered a resting state in which they do not produce any parts of the virus. Scientists have found that the HIV DNA–or “provirus”–inside resting cells is usually so defective that it cannot generate new virus particles. However, most available tools to measure the HIV reservoir cannot distinguish intact proviruses, which can replicate themselves, from the vast excess of defective proviruses.Related StoriesPrevalence of anal cancer precursors is higher in women living with HIV than previously reportedNovel method can help clinicians identify individuals most in need of PrEPHIV therapy leaves unrepaired holes in the immune system’s wall of defenseA team led by Robert F. Siliciano, M.D., at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine analyzed DNA sequences from more than 400 HIV proviruses taken from 28 people with HIV. Among these proviruses, the scientists mapped two types of flaws: deletions and lethal mutations. The researchers then developed strategically placed genetic probes that could distinguish the deleted or highly mutated HIV proviruses from the intact ones. Finally, the scientists developed a nanotechnology-based method to analyze one provirus at a time with these probes to determine how many proviruses in a sample are intact.The researchers demonstrated that their method can readily and accurately measure the number of rare, intact proviruses that make up the HIV reservoir. The hope is that this new method will speed HIV research by allowing scientists to easily quantify the number of proviruses in an individual that must be eliminated to achieve a cure.Source: https://www.niaid.nih.gov/news-events/nih-supported-scientists-develop-tool-measure-success-hiv-cure-strategieslast_img read more

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AfricanAmericans in major US cities more likely to live in trauma deserts

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first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 11 2019African-Americans in major U.S. cities are significantly more likely to live in “trauma deserts” with limited access to advanced emergency medical care, according to new research from the University of Chicago Medicine. The study also shows the academic medical center’s new Level 1 Trauma Center led to a seven-fold reduction in Chicago’s access disparity.The findings, published March 8 in the Journal of the American Medical Association’s Network Open, are the first to be released about the impact of UChicago Medicine’s adult Level 1 Trauma Center. Adult trauma services at the hospital began in May 2018.”So much of the advocacy for the trauma center was framed in terms of racial equity,” said Elizabeth Tung, MD, MS, a primary care physician and instructor of medicine at UChicago Medicine who was the paper’s first author. “But we realized no previous studies had addressed trauma access through the lens of race/ethnicity – not just looking at Chicago, but comparing our city to other communities as well.”The research team examined access to trauma care in Chicago, New York and Los Angeles using a geospatial analysis that compared the location of designated trauma centers with the racial and ethnic composition of the cities’ census tracts. The project included only Level 1 and Level 2 Trauma Centers, which are able to provide medical care to patients with the most serious injuries.Using a standard established in previous research from colleagues at other hospitals, the team defined a “trauma desert” as any urban community that is at least five miles away from advanced trauma care. While many suburban and rural communities are significantly further away from trauma care, Tung said dense urban communities must be assessed differently.”Five miles in a rural area is probably five minutes away, but in an urban area that same distance could be 15 minutes or it could be two hours away – it entirely depends on traffic congestion,” Tung said. “The kind of care in urban trauma also differs from that in rural areas – the types of trauma are generally different, the patient volume is higher and the injuries are more severe.”Trauma centers provided advanced emergency medical care for patients with critical injuries, including those from motor vehicle accidents, falls, shootings and stabbings.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapyResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairHome-based support network helps stroke patients adjust after hospital dischargeIn Chicago, the team found that 73 percent of census tracts with a mostly black population were located in trauma deserts. Until UChicago Medicine’s trauma center opened 10 months ago on its Hyde Park medical campus, residents of those communities had 8.5 times higher odds of being farther away from trauma care than people living in the city’s white-majority census tracts. The new trauma center reduced this disparity by nearly 7-fold, to 1.6 times.”Since we opened the trauma center nearly one year ago in May, the disparity in access to adult trauma care has been significantly lessened for African-Americans in Chicago,” said Selwyn Rogers, Jr., MD, MPH, a professor of surgery and the director of UChicago Medicine’s trauma center, which has treated more than 2,000 trauma patients.In New York City, just 14 percent of African-American communities were located in trauma deserts. In Los Angeles, 89 percent of African-American communities were located in trauma deserts, although very few census tracts in Los Angeles remain predominantly African-American. The team said Chicago’s Hispanic and Latino communities were also more likely to be farther from trauma care than those living in white communities. The Hispanic and Latino disparity was not present in New York or Los Angeles.”Even though we had a sense that this was a racially divided issue, the data confirmed that this was the case in a significant way. It was pretty startling,” said Monica Peek, MD, MPH, an associate professor of medicine and health disparities researcher who was the senior author on the paper.UChicago Medicine has provided pediatric trauma care at Comer Children’s Hospital since 1990, but previously ended its adult trauma program in 1988 before announcing it would resume the service in 2015 in response to community requests. The hospital built a new adult emergency department, which opened in late December 2017. Adult trauma services launched about five months later, following regulatory approval.The researchers said they hope their findings highlight the lingering impact of structural inequality in U.S. cities. They said planning for new trauma centers, which require a significant financial investment, should include an assessment of how a new facility can help address racial equity. Source:https://www.uchicagomedicine.org/forefront/trauma-articles/2019/march/race-and-trauma-desert-researchlast_img read more

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Eccentric exercises could help fatigued dancers prevent injury improve jump performance

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first_imgOur study suggests fatigued dancers may lack the strength to control their legs when absorbing the forces from the landing, affecting the technique and artistry of their jump as well as increase risk for injury. Targeted eccentric exercises could enable them to control their movements when they’re tired. This may help them consistently perform the jump in good form as well as reduce the risk of injury.”Danielle N. Jarvis, PhD, ATC, senior author of the study and assistant professor of kinesiology at California State University Northridge Researchers studied 17 professional ballet dancers who performed 10 sauté jumps before and after a protocol designed to mimic a ballet class or rehearsal. They used a 12-camera motion capture system and force plates to collect three-dimensional movement data while the dancers performed the jumps. The researchers determined that the dancers’ ankles flexed more deeply upon landing when they were fatigued (30.32 degrees) compared to before they were tired (28.88 degrees). Fatigue also lessened the peak landing forces, meaning the dancers landed softer. The force plates determined they landed with 1.72 times their body weight when fatigued, vs. 2.13 times their body weight before they were fatigued. The motion capture system showed that while the dancers achieved the same jump height, they did not point their toes as proficiently when fatigued.Related StoriesDoing more harm than good: Scientists uncover harmful effects of dietary supplementsResearchers identify new sarcoma familial risk gene’Text neck’ may be causing bone spurs in young peopleBased on their findings, the researchers surmise that eccentric exercises could help lengthen and strengthen the calf muscles, counteracting the effects of fatigue. Eccentric muscle contractions occur in the lowering phase of a traditional movement (e.g. lowering into a squat, or lowering the arms after a biceps curl), causing a muscle to lengthen rather than shorten. One such exercise involves standing on both toes and then lowering one foot in a very slow, controlled manner, rather than letting the heel come down quickly.”Athletic trainers can work with dancers to identify eccentric movements they can do to achieve better control and jump more effectively,” said Dr. Jarvis. “We believe that if dancers are better able to control – and not collapse into – the landing, they are more likely to use the proper technique and may be less likely to get injured.” Source:National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jun 26 2019Exercises that lengthen leg muscles may help dancers counteract fatigue, preventing injury and allowing for a more perfected jump technique, suggests research being presented at the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) 70th Clinical Symposia & AT Expo.Researchers studied how well trained ballet dancers performed the classic sauté jump – a vertical jump with feet pointing down – before and after becoming fatigued by dancing. When tired, the dancers’ form suffered, both in air and on landing.Dance is a very physically demanding activity and injuries are common. However, there is limited research examining the biomechanics of dance movements and the effects of fatigue on dance performance and technique. The researchers sought to assess fatigue and resulting movement patterns to shed light on how athletic trainers can better work with dancers to prevent injuries.last_img read more

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